#1
Hello people

I have this Behringer guitar since I started, 1 year and 5 months ago. Not only the Behringer guitars tend to be bad, mine in particular has now horrible action and is really difficult to play ("unplayable", by a bassist friend). Now, despite this I've been getting better at guitar practicing only with this, and can do a sweep picking lick (the neoclassical one from Kris) at a considerable speed (almost as fast as the one in the video), for example. But I have one question:

By practicing on a bad guitar like this one, am I learning slower than if I practiced on a good one? I know in this guitar my playing isn't as comfortable and fast as in a good one, but is my learning being affected from this too? Do you learn faster on a better guitar?

Thanks
#2
My guitar has uneven string height (not action). I tried to get it fixed, but the mechanic ****ed it up. However, I make do with it. Remember, even the greats started on crappy gear.
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#3
If anything, I would think that practicing on a bad quality guitar would be good for you.
When you get a decent guitar, the things you may have struggled with will play themselves almost.
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#4
Quote by Gelato
If anything, I would think that practicing on a bad quality guitar would be good for you.
When you get a decent guitar, the things you may have struggled with will play themselves almost.

This is the only reason I'm continuing to learn how to sweep/shred properly on my shitty les paul instead of throwing the damn thing out the window.
#5
Quote by Gelato
If anything, I would think that practicing on a bad quality guitar would be good for you.
When you get a decent guitar, the things you may have struggled with will play themselves almost.

This is what I've always thought. As long as the guitar isn't so bad that it's constantly out of tune or it's a kid-sized guitar or something, it's shouldn't cause any issues.
#6
I think that's an old wives tail. If you are series about guitar, buy a decent guitar. You should practice and learn on the same guitar you intend to play with...obviously. Learning guitar on a high-action acoustic for the purpose of increasing your low-action electric playing is just dumb. You fret differently on a high action guitar, thus you learn slightly differently (if you like high action, then this is fine, but if your goal is to get a lower action guitar, then I don't think it is helping in any way)
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#7
If you are serious about guitar, try to buy yourself a decent one. It will last longer, be of higher quality parts, and will be easier to play and learn on. You will no longer be hindered by your guitar, and only by your willingness to play and practice, which if you really enjoy playing isn't a problem
#8
The guitar i practise with right now sounds pretty bad but it feels so good it basically plays it self.
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#9
Quote by Athetosis
This is what I've always thought. As long as the guitar isn't so bad that it's constantly out of tune or it's a kid-sized guitar or something, it's shouldn't cause any issues.


what's wrong with kid sized guitars?

when i'm playing around and learning new licks i always do it on my 3/4 sized ibanez rg mikro (although it is highly modified by this point i'll admit), $130 of pure awesomeness!

i actually prefer using it for practice to any of my full sized guitars.

short scale guitars can be decent it's just that most of them are made very cheaply because nobody sees the potential for crazy stretches, or really high tunings.
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#10
the thing I found was that learning on a guitar with a crappy high action helped me develope more speed when I got a good guitar with an insanely low action.
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#11
Quote by arizonagt

when i'm playing around and learning new licks i always do it on my 3/4 sized ibanez rg mikro (although it is highly modified by this point i'll admit), $130 of pure awesomeness!


That's the exact same guitar I got for my son's last birthday. I agree it's a nice little guitar. I borrow it from him occasionally.

Anyway, to the thread starter - yeah, I'd spend the money to get yourself a nice mid-level guitar. A few things -

1. Your playing will immediately sound better, which will give you a huge motivation boost to continue improving.
2. Sooner or later you will buy yourself a nice guitar. You need to learn the specific skills needed to play it (for example, pushing down just the right amount on the strings). Playing with high action will teach you to push down more than is necessary on a guitar with lower action.
3. There's some truth to the statement about playing on a crappy guitar improving your strength. But playing on a nice guitar will lead to you tackling more ambitious things sooner, many of which will also improve your finger strength.
#12
dont forget alot of the greats started on bad guitars

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#13
And don't forgot a lot of the greats started on semi-decent guitars...


A not-so-shitty guitar is a bit of a motivator, you should want to play your guitar.. not dread it because the strings are in inch of the fretboard or something
#14
well, when I got my first electric after I'd been playing on my acoustic for about 8 months at first it was kinda odd, but then after I got used to it (a couple of days) it seemed so much easier, so it may helps some, but really after you've been playing for a while and are pretty good it's just gonna hold you up, so a better guitar would be better
#15
People talk **** on here about the squiers from fender but I own a MIA Strat and have played a few squiers and they feel the same. THe sound isnt hte same but for a practice guitar that feels good for 99$ you cant go wrong. Ansd playing on a ****ed up guitar isnt NOT going to make you better.

I bought a used yamaha from the late 70s for 80$ only later to find out its worth over 500$ and it is a total monster. Its like an SG mahogany body gibson style bridge it has so much sustain. I have it all sanded down and its aobut to be repainted and have EMG 81/85s in it. Check your local paper or craiglist theres steals out there if you look. Get something you love and it will make you sound better make better music and be more inspired. If you creative and resourful you can do it cheap.
#16
Any guitar can be made better with $50, some spare time, and a drive to stop bitching on a forum and take care of the problem
#17
You don't learn based on what guitar you have, you learn based on how much you study and practice.
#18
Here's the simple truth, there's no reason to force yourself to learn on a crappy guitar.

It would seem logical, if you can play it on a crappy guitar, you can definately play it on a nice guitar. Sadly, that's not totally the case.

Why?

Simple, you're training yourself for a specific set of movements. By playing on a crappy guitar with bad action, worn frets, whatever, you're training yourself to play guitars that have bad action, worn frets, and whatever.

When you switch to a nicer guitar (i.e. one without the bad action, worn frets, whatever), your fingers are going to want to try to reproduce the motions they've been trained to do. You'll find yourself pushing too hard, your motions will likely be slow and awkward because you're not used to needing less pressure or what-have-you to play.

Unless you're planning on playing that same guitar until you die, go on ahead and start looking into something a little nicer. Chances are, after you step out of entry-level guitars, you won't play them ever again, especially not as your main guitar.

However, there is another, bigger problem, with a bad practice guitar. It can make playing difficult to the extent that it hinders growth. You spend so much time and energy working with the limitations of a guitar that you detract from actual practice and progression.

I don't know about you, but I'd like every minute I spend practicing to be as productive as possible.

Yes, you can make an entry-level guitar good, if not great. I've got a Kramer Focus (my first guitar) that will blow most $500 guitars away, but I've done considerable work to it (refining neck profile, filing frets, scalloping fretboard, painting, rewiring...). With the time and money investment in making an entry-level good, it's often not much more money to buy a mid-level guitar (unless you have considerable amounts of free time, a good set of resources, and decent skills already).

Buy yourself a decent mid-level guitar, one that has all the features you forsee yourself needing, you will eventually need to step up, regardless.

As far as "greats" like Hendrix playing a crappy guitar...

Tell me, do you know ANY guitarists that bought a Soloist or JEM as their first guitar? Now, how many guitarists do you know started out with a low end Squier, Epi, or the like?

Even people that kept a relatively "crappy" guitar, often did significant work to modify them, to the extent that they were comparable to mid or upper level axes (a great example, EVH, his guitar was cheap as crap, and almost nothing was unmodified on it).

Trust me, I'm pretty sure even the "greats" realized they needed to do something about their crappy guitars.
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#19
I can't play guitars in shops nearly as well as I can play my Dinky2 because I have it set up so nicely.
#20
Quote by Athetosis
This is what I've always thought. As long as the guitar isn't so bad that it's constantly out of tune or it's a kid-sized guitar or something, it's shouldn't cause any issues.



but then you get accustomed to the uneveness.