#1
i can see the similarities between modes and the maj/min scales, but i know there are slight differences. would you use them for different things, for diffenet sounds or is just personal preference?
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#3
so you can just throw out most of your theory of keys and scales, just throw a few power chords together then use modes for solos and riffs?
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#4
^no, i don't really know what you mean...?

your theory is still required, but to emphasise modality you need to keep the tonal centre on that mode... ie for F Lydian, you need the tonal centre of F. This may not be easy if you link together a few chords from C major.
#5
when applying a modal scale it is important to understand the relationship to chords. For example F Lydian (The Scale) will need an F Lydian chord scale to accompany it. If you get this right the Lydian mode will sound completely different to its relative major scale. Its not just about scales, thats half the story. The chords used over the scale are equally important. Let me know if you want more help on this.
#6
yeh, i know the chords that work in major and minor scales and how and why, but dont know about the modal ones. is it similar sort of principles? any help would be spot on
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#8
Quote by mozzay
would you use them for different things, for diffenet sounds
Yes

Each mode has a unique sound which comes from it's unique intervals.
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Quote by MudMartin
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#9
To explain it in the way I understand, modal music is apparent when you have a mostly static chord background for something to play over, the specific scale played over the background is the mode. Generally there are very few chord changes, you can pick a modal song out when you can hear a chord being held for a very long time in the background. The big difference is that key based music focuses on a tonal centre and the song will resolve to this centre or it will sound incomplete, where modal music focuses on the feeling of the scale which is brought out by it's interaction with the backing chord if you don't have that backing chord the scale won't sound as distinct. If I am wrong feel free to correct me.
#10
Modes usually use a static chord progression, as stated, and different modes are used for different tones. A famous one to me is the use of the mixolydian mode to get a bluesy sound without being constricted to 5 notes as with the pentatonic scale. The dorian mode gives off a jazzy quality, while the lydian is most similar to the major scale (listen to David Gilmour, he's great at using the lydian mode. I can't really describe te phyrgian that well, and the locrian is...well, really ****ing tough to put music to.

Edit: Aeolian is minor sounding. Duh lol.
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#11
The general idea behind using them is to get tonalities other than standard Major and Minor ones. Additionally, borrowing harmonic devices from parallel modes(being in D Minor and borrowing from D Dorian) is a way to implement these tonalities within a Major or Minor tonality.
#12
Quote by grampastumpy
borrowing harmonic devices from parallel modes(being in D Minor and borrowing from D Dorian) is a way to implement these tonalities within a Major or Minor tonality.


can you give an example. Which harmonic devices would sound good, I do not understand that idea but I'm sure it means something.

D E F G A Bb C D

D E F G A B C D

?
#13
Quote by farcry
can you give an example. Which harmonic devices would sound good, I do not understand that idea but I'm sure it means something.

D E F G A Bb C D

D E F G A B C D

?
For instance, if you have a progression something like Dm Bb F G, the G has a B natural in it, which could be said to be borrowed from D Dorian.
#14
Quote by grampastumpy
For instance, if you have a progression something like Dm Bb F G, the G has a B natural in it, which could be said to be borrowed from D Dorian.


I often see this kind of progression Am D F E where the E serves as a turnaround chord to restart the progression over again. Now the original progression I would consider G major because when I play that I usually resolve later to a G, however the G# in the E totally throws me off. is it part of what you are talking about or just a chromatic kind of passing tone created by the the third string going A G# A. Is there a book or a website that could teach me this topic more in depth? Thanks for the help by the way.
#15
Quote by farcry
I often see this kind of progression Am D F E where the E serves as a turnaround chord to restart the progression over again. Now the original progression I would consider G major because when I play that I usually resolve later to a G, however the G# in the E totally throws me off. is it part of what you are talking about or just a chromatic kind of passing tone created by the the third string going A G# A. Is there a book or a website that could teach me this topic more in depth? Thanks for the help by the way.
The E chord is a different concept entirely and has nothing to do with modes. It is for creating a stronger resolution, primarily from the G# to the A as you said. In minor keys, though the v chord is technically minor, it is usually a V instead to create that resolution. This is the reason the harmonic minor scale was invented(natural 7th = major V chord). I don't know of anywhere really, if it's not in the theory sticky I don't know where to tell you to go. I'm sure someone else does though, just wait it out.
#18
I've been thinking about getting my first degree done with and going back for a music theory degree. Uhh... one day hopefully.