#1
Hello, okay right down to the question. So i've learned the melodic minor scale in hopes of making some neat solos or improv or whatever. Anyway I was wondering do i just play the minor chord progressions over this? Or am i going to have to form an entirely new set of chords(triads) to play say a i IV V or whatever. Cheers.
#2
Melodic minor (hence the name) is very rarely used to construct chord progressions, as it is harmonically weak. It would generally be played over a minor progression (minor, in this case, implies the use of a major V chord). Really, it's use differs depending on whether you're playing classical or jazz, and you'll rarely see it outside of those genres. It's use in jazz is somewhat complex, and if you're interested in learning just how jazz music applies scales like melodic minor, I suggest getting a teacher or finding yourself a good textbook. In classical music, melodic minor is treated more as an alteration of the minor scale than as a scale in its own right. Since harmonic minor's augmented second is melodically rough, the sixth degree of the scale is frequently raised when moving towards the seventh (and lowered when moving towards the fifth).
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
Melodic minor (hence the name) is very rarely used to construct chord progressions, as it is harmonically weak. It would generally be played over a minor progression (minor, in this case, implies the use of a major V chord). Really, it's use differs depending on whether you're playing classical or jazz, and you'll rarely see it outside of those genres. It's use in jazz is somewhat complex, and if you're interested in learning just how jazz music applies scales like melodic minor, I suggest getting a teacher or finding yourself a good textbook. In classical music, melodic minor is treated more as an alteration of the minor scale than as a scale in its own right. Since harmonic minor's augmented second is melodically rough, the sixth degree of the scale is frequently raised when moving towards the seventh (and lowered when moving towards the fifth).

dude you know alot about music theory.
next time i have a question im gonna ask you lol
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#4
Refer to Archeo's post for correct information; just in case it isn't apparent enough, the augmented second he speaks of in the harmonic minor scale occurs between the sixth and seventh degrees.
#5
Quote by :-D
just in case it isn't apparent enough, the augmented second he speaks of in the harmonic minor scale occurs between the sixth and seventh degrees.


I'm missing something here. Please could you explain this for me?
#6
Quote by mdc
I'm missing something here. Please could you explain this for me?


Due to the raised seventh, the distance between the sixth and seventh degrees of the harmonic minor scale (for example, Ab and B in C minor) is an augmented second.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
Due to the raised seventh, the distance between the sixth and seventh degrees of the harmonic minor scale (for example, Ab and B in C minor) is an augmented second.


Thank you. All of a sudden I'm like "Why didn't I get that?"
#8
All good information. I might also add that in "classical" music (or "concert" music, or "serious" music), the melodic minor scale is seen as having two different forms, one being the ascending form (with the natural 6th and 7th scale degrees) and also the descending form (with the flatted 6th and 7th scale degrees).

The reason this came about is because when the natural seventh, also known as the "leading tone", was often used ascendingly in the melody, creating a tension that wanted to move a half step up to the root. As Archeo Avis stated, this use of the natural seventh implied a dominant chord (V or vii dim). When ascending from the fifth scale degree, though, you didn't want to go from the flatted sixth to a natural seventh because that would result in a use of the augmented second. This was avoided by raising the sixth degree, also.

You'll notice in most "classical" (ie Baroque, Classical, etc), especially Baroque, that once that root has been played or hit in the melody, the descent uses the flatted sixth and seventh scale degrees, resulting in the second or descending form of the melodic minor scale, more commonly known as simply the natural minor scale. So the descending melodic minor scale and the natural minor scale are the same thing, while the ascending melodic minor scale simply raises the sixth and seventh scale degree to create a strong tension and resolution melodically and harmonically.

Just a little more info to throw out there.