#4
i was thinking about moving the bridge to accomadate for this would it matter where the pickups are placed
#6
It might look a little strange, but if you moved the bridge it would work just fine. You shouldn't need to move the pickups.
#8
I meant from all the holes where the bridge used to be. That would be pretty hard to cover up.
#9
i was thinking about routing out to fit for the new measurements and than either fit a piece of wood then glue it and sand it flush or some kind of filler
#10
i found this


VII. The Neck

A. What is scale length and what does it mean?

Scale length is defined as the "length of the string". This
is measured as the distance between two points: one at the
bridge and one at the nut. The points where the strings
contact the nut and the bridge define the scale length of
the guitar.

A longer scale will, to a point, give more sustain. The
reason for this is that the tighter a string is stretched,
the longer it will sustain, and for a string of any given
thickness, the string at the longer scale will have to be
tensioned higher than the string at the shorter scale to
reach the same pitch. However, a longer scale will
make the fret distances longer and make it more difficult to
reach the frets.

Most guitar scale lengths are between 24 and 26 inches, with
the most common being 24 3/4 in. (Les Paul style) and 25 1/2
in. (Fender style).

B. How do I determine fret spacing?

Fret spacing is determined by the "18 rule" (actually, it is
more like 17.817). The fret spacing is in calculated as
follows:

The distance to the first fret from the nut is calculated by
dividing the total scale length by 17.817. For a 25 1/2 in.
scale...

25.5 / 17.817 = 1.431273 (or 1.431)

That result is then subtracted from the total scale length...

25.5 - 1.431 = 24.069

That result is divided by 17.817 to get the distance from the
first fret to the second...

24.069 / 17.817 = 1.351

and so on.

it said scale lengths between 24.75" and 26" so does that mean i be fine without routing or what? im trying to understand this
#11
All you need to know is that the entire length of the string with a 25.5" neck must be precisely 25.5". You'll notice the saddles can be adjusted a little bit to make the measurement exact, but from the nut to the saddle needs to be 25.5 otherwise your frets won't be at the right intervals and it will be horribly out of tune.
Basically, you need to move the bridge back.
#12
it wont work. I asked the same question months ago and got "it should, just try it" answers. well It don't unless your willing to route your body and move the bride back
Quote by MASTER JiMMY
Stop failing, and things will work out.
#13
The bridge must be moved.

Yes, you can route the body and fill the hole with a block of wood... or you can just dowel the old holes and sand them flush... then paint the body over again to hide it.

Doweling the holes is not difficult. You just cut a wooden dowel to precisely the same diameter as the hole. Push it in, glue it, then cut off the excess with a chisel or something you have available (small saw or flush cut saw sometimes). Sand it flat. You're done.

Placing the new bridge location is much more difficult. You must align the 1st string saddle at the 25.5" mark on the body. This is easiest if you attach the neck, then draw out the bridge.

Put some masking tape on the body to draw on.

Measure the pull of the string down from the front of the nut (side facing the 1st fret) to the 25.5" mark. It's best to angle the straight edge as the 1st string would lay across the neck/body.

Next you place a straight edge down the side of the neck and draw a line protruding out past the bridge. Do this for both sides of the neck to see the taper projected across the body.

Now if you can use those lines to center up the bridge and eyeball it well enough, you might be fine. If not, then you need to locate the center line to center up the bridge.

Measure 3 marks on the taper lines at the same distance from the neck pocket or use a pickup hole if its straight. (for example... maybe 6", 8", and 10") Draw perpendicular lines across the body connecting the taper lines at those three marks. Now measure each line and cut it in half. Mark the halfway point.

Once the three points are marked along the middle, you should be able to draw a straight line through them. If it doesn't line up straight, you messed something up.. so start over.

When you have the center line, its really easy to place the bridge now. You know where the intonation point is (where the string leaves the high 'E' saddle) so you align the bridge on top of these two lines.

If your bridge is a tunomatic, it most likely was set at an angle to the center line. If you draw a line across the centers of the dowel holes, you can see the angle the bridge is supposed to be placed at. You want to get this right or your intonation adjustments might not go far enough to intonate.

Use a punch to mark your bridge holes.

Drill the holes using a brad point bit that will fit the inserts or screws tightly. Install the inserts/anchors/bridge or screw the bridge down at this point. (depending on which type you have)

Remeasure your scale. You should be able to measure from the front of the nut to the 12th fret and then from the 12th fret to the high 'e' saddle and get the same measurement. This is useful if your straightedge/ruler is not 25.5" long.

That's all there is to it.
All my photobucket pics are dead so no links to my guitar build threads.
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Last edited by zeroyon at Aug 7, 2008,
#14
depending on the style you could alter the saddles to account for the difference in intonation

btw the distance between the frets is the twelfth root of 2 x the distance to the last fret.
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#15
very helpful so far but the body is recessed for a kahler flatmount will this effect anything?
#16
Quote by Roc8995
All you need to know is that the entire length of the string with a 25.5" neck must be precisely 25.5". You'll notice the saddles can be adjusted a little bit to make the measurement exact, but from the nut to the saddle needs to be 25.5 otherwise your frets won't be at the right intervals and it will be horribly out of tune.
Basically, you need to move the bridge back.

Actually, each string has it's own ideal length, and it differs from string to string. The string's ideal length may or may not be a little more or less than 25.5".

The rest is right though .
#17
It depends on the neck and body. I have a strat thats been converted from 25.5 to 24.75. All I did was bolt a neck on didnt need to move the bridge. But its a warmoth conversion neck made to fit in any standard strat neck pocket. Standard as in 25.5 with 21 fret neck. If you have a body with a standard fender neck pocket then may not be so big an issue. But something like a bolt neck epi or other manufacture then a fender neck wont drop in anyways. All the companies use slightly different neck pockets so neck compatability would be an issue.
#18
well the body i have is supposed to be an epiphone explorer (but its a for a bolt on neck and i thought all gibson and epiphone explorers were setnecks but i guess anythings possible( with a kahler and recessed and the neck i have was built by a luthier