#1
So I understand that i can play the 3rd and 5th to kind of bridge the chords together,
like: E D (domin)C#(3rd of A) A. But how do scales and modes come into this?
Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian. I know how to play these in the differant scales, but how do i apply them to my work?

Sorry for any mistakes, bad spelling, etc. Im tired and im still trying to get my head around this.
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#2
Try applying scales as fills after the root note.

Example. Guitarist plays a minor chord. You fill that space up with notes from the a minor scale.

Hope i helped a little?
#3
Quote by Randy Bobandy
Try applying scales as fills after the root note.

Example. Guitarist plays a minor chord. You fill that space up with notes from the a minor scale.

Hope i helped a little?




It didnt. I dont understand, I just add random notes from the scale to line? Where do modes come into play?
You stole my Overture
#4
modes are different shapes of a chord. such as Gmajor is the "same" as Aminor. there are different shapes and applications to each scale and chord. Such as if someone is playing Gmajor you can play a ionian or lydian. look up modes under the lessons there is a really good one there

http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/modes_ii.html
there it is
Last edited by treebranch13 at Aug 7, 2008,
#5
use the notes in the arpeggios of the chords that are being played

determine the key of the song & use scale tones to move between chords

use chromatic movement to approach notes

use octaves

occasionally double fragments of the melody (can sound great)

vary the register of the line you're playing

vary the dynamics of the line you're playing

most basslines just use root, 3rd, 5th, and octave of a scale because they provide a solid harmonic foundation - one of the fundamental functions of the bass
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#6
Quote by treebranch13
modes are different shapes of a chord. such as Gmajor is the "same" as Aminor. there are different shapes and applications to each scale and chord. Such as if someone is playing Gmajor you can play a ionian or lydian. look up modes under the lessons there is a really good one there

http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/modes_ii.html
there it is


Hmm, so if say the key of a song is E, and there is a progression of say, E D C A
I can use the ionian dorian phrygian and mixolydian modes of E?
You stole my Overture
#7
Quote by BulletFrost


It didnt. I dont understand, I just add random notes from the scale to line? Where do modes come into play?



No, not really random. You should find different ways to play the scale or mode from beginning to end, as long as you have time to fit it in along with the chord changes.

It is just a matter of improvising off of the root note with notes from the appropriate scale or mode.
#8
So would this work if i was in the key of E

G--------------------------14--14h12--14h12------------
D---------------------------------------------------14-------
A-7-77-7---8h7--12---------------------------------12---
E---------7------------------------------------------------12


Prob sounds bad, but im looking for correct.
You stole my Overture
#9
Quote by BulletFrost
So would this work if i was in the key of E

G--------------------------14--14h12--14h12------------
D---------------------------------------------------14-------
A-7-77-7---8h7--12---------------------------------12---
E---------7------------------------------------------------12


Prob sounds bad, but im looking for correct.


sure it would work, but its weak. first try to incorporate a third, without it you have to rely on everyone else your playing with to determine whether the chord is major or minor. also i would suggest changing your f-flat to a d#, that way your incorporating a major 7th instead of a minor 2nd.
"music is a unison of emotion and technicality. without technicality you have chaos, without emotion you have sand"
#10
I still dont get it.
If im playing in the key of F and i want say i happy sound, I play notes from the F dorian mode?
Since the first note of the scale changes from F to E flat does that mean i play it over a E chord? Very confused UG.
You stole my Overture
#11
I still dont get it.
If im playing in the key of F and i want say i happy sound, I play notes from the F dorian mode?
Since the first note of the scale changes from F to E flat does that mean i play it over a E chord? Very confused UG.

Generally it's the overall band that dictates the "happy sound", all the band have to be in same key. Keeping an eye on the chord progression is a must rather than just focusing on the scale in the key of the song. You don't want to accent, for example, 'F' if the guitarist is playing a 'G'.
The way I look at modes, it's just starting at a different root in a certain key and playing a major or minor scale depending on the chord. After, then I can look, "Oh I played a F major scale starting at Eb - which was this mode."
#12
i actually find its way cooler to just play the root notes each time the guitarist strums a chord, and play with a pick up at about the 15th fret, thats definitely the best way to play
BE HAPPY

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#13
Quote by BulletFrost
So I understand that i can play the 3rd and 5th to kind of bridge the chords together,
like: E D (domin)C#(3rd of A) A. But how do scales and modes come into this?
Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian. I know how to play these in the differant scales, but how do i apply them to my work?

Sorry for any mistakes, bad spelling, etc. Im tired and im still trying to get my head around this.



The mode is dependent upon the underlying harmony, even though you might think I'm playing C major scale over an Fmaj7 chord, you're in fact playing F lydian.

At first the best notes to play around with are the chord tones and then just mix around these with a rhythm that sounds tight with whatever the drummer is playing. Next is to add notes from the scale, generally most popular pieces are diatonic so you're safe just sticking with one scale throughout, but check for any key changes may they be implied or fully stated.

After that it's just a matter of practice and finding out what sounds good. For example one thing I personally like to do is to outline a different chord to the overall harmony but which shares 2 or 3 notes and not play the root of the chord. Eg for Cmaj7, C E G B, I might focus on the notes G B D F. This adds to the musical tension and helps to build the piece up to a climax. Though do it too often and people might think you keep messing up, because it won't sound "right".
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#14
Quote by sinan90
The mode is dependent upon the underlying harmony, even though you might think I'm playing C major scale over an Fmaj7 chord, you're in fact playing F lydian.

At first the best notes to play around with are the chord tones and then just mix around these with a rhythm that sounds tight with whatever the drummer is playing. Next is to add notes from the scale, generally most popular pieces are diatonic so you're safe just sticking with one scale throughout, but check for any key changes may they be implied or fully stated.

After that it's just a matter of practice and finding out what sounds good. For example one thing I personally like to do is to outline a different chord to the overall harmony but which shares 2 or 3 notes and not play the root of the chord. Eg for Cmaj7, C E G B, I might focus on the notes G B D F. This adds to the musical tension and helps to build the piece up to a climax. Though do it too often and people might think you keep messing up, because it won't sound "right".


in a nutshell, this

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#15
Quote by sinan90
The mode is dependent upon the underlying harmony, even though you might think I'm playing C major scale over an Fmaj7 chord, you're in fact playing F lydian.

At first the best notes to play around with are the chord tones and then just mix around these with a rhythm that sounds tight with whatever the drummer is playing. Next is to add notes from the scale, generally most popular pieces are diatonic so you're safe just sticking with one scale throughout, but check for any key changes may they be implied or fully stated.

After that it's just a matter of practice and finding out what sounds good. For example one thing I personally like to do is to outline a different chord to the overall harmony but which shares 2 or 3 notes and not play the root of the chord. Eg for Cmaj7, C E G B, I might focus on the notes G B D F. This adds to the musical tension and helps to build the piece up to a climax. Though do it too often and people might think you keep messing up, because it won't sound "right".

This helped, thank you.

Quote by mosh_face
i actually find its way cooler to just play the root notes each time the guitarist strums a chord, and play with a pick up at about the 15th fret, thats definitely the best way to play

This was a sad attempt to be funny. GTFO of my thread.
You stole my Overture