#1
Hey all,

I have a bit of an issue at band practice with our practice space and getting the most out of it. It's not the largest space in the world (would fit about 5/6 fairly large drums kits in there all alligned one in front of the other, closely). And i just find that our sound suffers a little from it, things get a little too noisy and busy in there for our three-peice, and our instruments get that typical small-time pub band sound.

On top of this, we'll soon be buying a 250W speaker to go with my mixer for a PA so we can add some vocals to our songs. What can i do to let the sound breathe a bit when we practice, i.e the set-up of the speakers (positioning), opening curtains and windows etc?

Thanks

Rough measurement of space off the top of me head would be about 5-6 Metres long, and about 2.5 Metres wide. Drummer at the back faces the furthest wall
"If you want beef, then bring the ruckus." - Marilyn Monroe
#3
Quote by gregg freeman
it sounds silly but your best bet lowering your overall volume.

Yeah, that was the only thing i could think of, but we get a little drowned by our drummer who naturally plays pretty hard. =/
"If you want beef, then bring the ruckus." - Marilyn Monroe
#5
Try putting up curtains or just pinning up some heavy fabric along all the walls, which will dull down the natural echo of the room, which in turn will sort out a lot of your problems because it's that echo that's making the sound 'noisy and busy.'
You can also play around with leaving sections of the walls without fabric on them (which is why I suggested curtains, they are easier to adjust) so you adjust the room's natural sound until you get as near to the sound you want as possible.
#6
try using those black covers that silence the drums slightly more.

if not i sometimes put masking tape on the cymbals so the note wont sustain as long

EDIT:

if you are going to try and cover the room in fabric your best bet is acoustic foam (i think it is called that). i think it is expensive, but worth it. it also soundproofs the room more.
Last edited by moe lestor at Aug 8, 2008,
#7
Quote by moe lestor

if you are going to try and cover the room in fabric your best bet is acoustic foam (i think it is called that). i think it is expensive, but worth it. it also soundproofs the room more.

Acoustic foam is expensive and you're right, it'll probably give the best results and even make the room favorable for a recording, but this is just for practicing in and you'd be amazed how severely just a bit of heavy fabric on the walls can dull down a room.
Carpet tiles is another option.

Also, with all this talk of covering the walls with fabrics and foams, it's worth remembering that it's an added fire risk that probably won't pass any official fire department or insurance inspections unless it's specially treated fabric or foam, and that obviously you should be aware that if you do take this course of action, you should be extra careful with heaters and other electrical equipment and at least have a fire extinguisher handy.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 9, 2008,
#9
Another angle... and this might be way off base, not having heard you... .is that sometimes less is more. If it sounds noisy and busy, try less gain on the guitars and simplifying some of the parts. It will give your sound a little more 'breathing room' and might actually make it sound tighter and punchier.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
get the sticks for the drummer that are like 6 skinny peices of wood taped together... they make it much quieter and if he hits it hard like you said he will still get a good sound... just quieter
#12
Quote by AwesomeDrummer
mutes = bad idea.

they are genuine pricks.

i rather dislike them.

What's wrong with em? The drummer in my band doesn't use em much anymore because he favors brushes for that stuff now but they got the job done.
#13
Quote by Zycho
What's wrong with em? The drummer in my band doesn't use em much anymore because he favors brushes for that stuff now but they got the job done.


Sorry, but they make you what i like to call - 'out of form'. they dont have the usual feel of playing an actual skin if you know what i mean. Lack of bounce, etc, puts you off.
Brushes are a much better idea, but really your drummer should be able to play quiter if he has any skill. I ask of the TS, how many sticks does he break on average every month or so?