#1
I just spoke to my friend on msn, he's the drummer in my band and my amp lives at his house to avoid having to lug it around everytime we practice. He told me that after we left he was tidying his room a bit and he pulled the lead out of my amp, and that the jack was lodged in there. I told him to unscrew the input but he says he doesnt want to break it. I'm gonna pick it up tomorow so I can try to fix it.
1.Has this ever happened to anyone/how did you fix it?
2.My bass is active and the amp has two inputs, one passive, one active. If the jack won't come out, will I just be able to use the other input?

Thanks in advance.
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#2
You can use the other jack, but there'll be volume difference if you use an active bass in a passive jack, and vice versa. But thats easily solved by turning up the volume. If you want to get it fixed, post a picture when you can so its easier to help, but if we can't help you then I'd take it to a tech to have a look at it.
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#3
Quote by fleajr_1412
You can use the other jack, but there'll be volume difference if you use an active bass in a passive jack, and vice versa. But thats easily solved by turning up the volume. If you want to get it fixed, post a picture when you can so its easier to help, but if we can't help you then I'd take it to a tech to have a look at it.


Actually, it would be better to adjust the input gain than to adjust the overall volume. It's slightly better for the preamp.
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#4
But wouldn't setting the gain higher than normal drive the pre-amp harder, potentially causing damage? Could you explain please?
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#5
^+1
Please explain? I can get pics up tomorow probably so you can see what I'm talking about.
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#6
Quote by fleajr_1412
But wouldn't setting the gain higher than normal drive the pre-amp harder, potentially causing damage? Could you explain please?


He didn't say set it higher than normal.

He just said adjust it, so you'd want to lower the input level.
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#7
Ah, I thought he meant to set it higher to compensate for the loss of volume.
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#9
This should not at all be very difficult to repair. Figuring out how to get access to backside of the socket is probably the most tricky part of the job. Most common is a system that secures the base plate holding all the electronics except for the speaker in one unit that you can slide out as a whole once the bolts holding it to the outer casing are removed. The heads of these bolts can be hidden underneath plastic caps, and the electronic assembly may either slide out towards the front or the back. Other constructions are not uncommon though.

Once you've sorted this out, getting the broken pin out of the socket will be a matter of seconds. It's one of the crudest, lowest tech parts you'll find in an amp. If it's damaged, you'll probably be able to bend it back into shape again and a replacement part costs a few pennies only.
Worst case is that you'll find an enclosed switching socket. These are not as servicable and cost a few pence more. Still not a thing to worry about.

One thing you'd better not do is pushing the broken off pin into the amp. For a short while this may seem to solve the problem, but sooner rather than later this piece will short circuit the electronics somewhere and cause real damage.
#10
Thanks marcel that was a great help. Should I be phased by the thing on the back that says beware of electrocution or is that just to stop people breaking it...
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Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
#11
similar thing happened to my old teachers bass, the end of the lead pretty much fell apart in his output jack, he had to take his bass apart to get all the peices out and it still wouldn't work
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#12
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Thanks marcel that was a great help. Should I be phased by the thing on the back that says beware of electrocution or is that just to stop people breaking it...


No, for that there is the label sitting next to it saying 'contains no servicable parts', which is untrue in most cases and utterly irrelevant as soon as something inside breaks down.

The electrocution hazard warning, on the other hand, should be taken very seriously. If it is a tube amp even more so.
If it is a solid state amp, the big hazard comes from the high tension elco's directly connected to the main transformer and the transformer itself. They can capicitate enough tension to kill a dinosaur, if one would still be alive to take such maltreatment.

The best way to go about this is to disconnect the main power lead today and wait till tomorrow to take apart the amp. To be absolutely sure, let the first thing you do as soon as you've exposed the internals be to connect the two leads of one elco to a voltmeter. It should read zero, and if not, the reading will quickly drop to that level through the power taken by the meter. Mind that there might be two or even more elco's, which are easily recognizable as being cylindrical pots that are far bigger than any other electronic component you'll see in there. This should drain all the electricty out of the elco's as well as the transformer and make the device save to work on.

A tube amp might hold dangerous tension in other places too. Connecting the voltmeter to any odd place you might suspect to hold a potential difference will get you rid of this.

Oh, and now you've disassembled your amp, take this oppertunity to blow off accumulated dust, to spray some contact agent into the potmeters and to check the tightness of the nuts holding the potmeters and sockets to the front panel. That might save you the trouble of going through the whole procedure again next month.

Good luck.
Last edited by Marcel Veltman at Aug 8, 2008,
#13
This happed with one of my old cords. I just took a pair of needlenose pliers and pulled it out.

Remember to unplug it.
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#14
ahh this happened to me and i fixed it myself, but to be honest i wouldnt risk it as mine was lodge into a really ****ty old amp, which i didn't care about. Take it to a guitar shop it shouldnt be too pricey.