#1
Okay I have a few questions about finger picking.

1) Is it bad that I rest the right side of my right hand beneath the bridge? I don't rest my pinky.

2) Are you supposed to pick the high E with your pinky? I play E A D with my thumb and then G - index, B - middle, and E - ring. Is that right?

3)
|-------------------|
|-(0)---------------|
|-------0-----0-----|
|-----0-----0-----0-|
|-------------------|
|--3------2-----0---|


If you play that part in classical gas would you do the thumb twice and then index? Or would you do it thumb, then for the d string index, and then middle??

Oh yeah and for classical gas are you supposed to use your pinky on your right hand? I remember someone telling me thats how its done. And then someone else telling me thats not how its done
#2
i heard that in finger picking, you rarely use your pinky to pick the strings... whether this is true or not, i dont know.. but i dont tend to use it much.. but i still use it sometimes (building a little strength in it cant be a bad thing)

as with that tab... id play it: thumb, index, mid, thumb, index, mid, thumb index (id play the open b with my ring finger)
#3
Play EAD with thumb, G with second, B with third, and E with fourth always. Sometimes you need to bend the rules a little bit when playing something like:

-
-
-
0
-
0

In this case you would use thumb for E and index for D string. Hope that helped.
#4
The 2 worst habits finger pickers start off with [especially if they start off on acoustics] and that become ingrained when learning, is resting the pinky or wrist on the sound board or bridge. They do that to help with accuracy when plucking the strings because they are closer together than on classical guitars. Later on those bad habits become a disadvantage because basically the picking hand is mostly stuck in the same spot all the time [a boring sound regardless of what's being played] and there are other disadvantages that are too many to mention.

The best way to learn fingerpicking is on a classical useing correct technique: Thumb outside the other fingers. wrist higher than the thumb. It doesn't take long to get down if you take it slowly and later allows the picking hand to move anywhere along the strings for variety of sound and also with the wrist higher than the thumb the fingers attack the strings at much better angles which helps with expression. It's often painful to watch acoustic players finger pick!

Although there are some good acoustic pickers out there, they would have been a hell of a lot better pickers if they had started off learning and persisting with correct picking technique until it became habit. You don't have to lean correct technique on a classical, it's just easier than learning it on a steel string.
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 7, 2008,
#5
Quote by Akabilk
The 2 worst habits finger pickers start off with [especially if they start off on acoustics] and that become ingrained when learning, is resting the pinky or wrist on the sound board or bridge. They do that to help with accuracy when plucking the strings because they are closer together than on classical guitars. Later on those bad habits become a disadvantage because basically the picking hand is mostly stuck in the same spot all the time [a boring sound regardless of what's being played] and there are other disadvantages that are too many to mention.

The best way to learn fingerpicking is on a classical useing correct technique: Thumb outside the other fingers. wrist higher than the thumb. It doesn't take long to get down if you take it slowly and later allows the picking hand to move anywhere along the strings for variety of sound and also with the wrist higher than the thumb the fingers attack the strings at much better angles which helps with expression. It's often painful to watch acoustic players finger pick!

Although there are some good acoustic pickers out there, they would have been a hell of a lot better pickers if they had started off learning and persisting with correct picking technique until it became habit. You don't have to lean correct technique on a classical, it's just easier than learning it on a steel string.


I've heard this before about the thumb being outside the fingers. So does this mean the thumb strikes more on the side of the thumb than the tip (like the other fingers?)?
#6
Slightly to the side of the nail with the thumb mostly rigid in a slightly bent back often stiff position so your not using the thumb joint to pick with. The other 3 fingers are striking the string almost vertically. With the upward plucking movement kept to a minimum so their ready to strike another note or string very quickly, not way up almost into the palm of the hand which is a common fault.

Watch a few good classical guitarists [to see what I mean] take full tonal advantage of a freely moving picking hand on you-tube and then watch some acoustic finger pickers stuck down near the bottom of the strings if they rest their wrist [or in the one spot if they use their pinky to rest on] and their thumb often inside the fingers [getting in the way for more difficult pieces later]. Big difference!

Watch the master John Williams and notice the stiff thumb and high wrist. He's not using his pinky to pick with either, it just looks like it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StxpWgfhjIg
Last edited by Akabilk at Aug 7, 2008,