#1
hey i know the minor pentatonic scale in all the 5 postilions and i understand that if you move it up and down the neck its in a different key, right? like if it was at the 5th fret it would be the Aminor pentatonic, which bet what happens when i move the pattern to A sharp? does it just become A sharp minor? what scales should i learn for jazz/rock leads and stuff? im a bit bored and i have my first guitar lesson on saturday and wouldnt mind learning a nice scale to mess about improvising in any help would be good thanks
My Beginner setup:
Ibanez rg321mh
Roland Micro cube
#2
correct me if im wrong, but A sharp minor makes no sense..i think.
minor wud be one fret less(so A minor wud be on the fourth fret, also being g sharp), and sharp wud be one fret more(so A sharp wud be at the 6th fret, also being B minor).
so if u think mathematically, A sharp minor wud be A, because Minor and Sharp cancel eachother out, its like 1-1=0, and zero wud be A.
i hope the math part wasnt to confusing.
and for jazz and rock u wud probably not be using pentatonics because they are for blues(but they are used in rock a lot, but not really jazz)
#4
aw my head lol. i have no idea mate, I just learnt the a minor pentatonic scale of a site and it said that you can move it up and down to play in a diff key but then i though wait a minute what would they then be called? I mean i figure at B it would be b minor pentatonic but the sharps/flats are confusing me. And what scales should i learn for jazz? anyone know of a good site to help me explain this stuff to me and teach me some new stuff?
My Beginner setup:
Ibanez rg321mh
Roland Micro cube
#5
Quote by lwayneio
hey i know the minor pentatonic scale in all the 5 postilions and i understand that if you move it up and down the neck its in a different key, right? like if it was at the 5th fret it would be the Aminor pentatonic, which bet what happens when i move the pattern to A sharp? does it just become A sharp minor?


Yes.


Quote by stratdud39
correct me if im wrong, but A sharp minor makes no sense..i think.
minor wud be one fret less(so A minor wud be on the fourth fret, also being g sharp), and sharp wud be one fret more(so A sharp wud be at the 6th fret, also being B minor).
so if u think mathematically, A sharp minor wud be A, because Minor and Sharp cancel eachother out, its like 1-1=0, and zero wud be A.


No, you have confused minor with flat.

Quote by Gummy Balls
Who the hell posts that they made up a chord on a guitar forum? He should of just called this thread " flame the shit out me".


~Founder of the Pokemon Appreciation Club~
#7
yes, if you slid your little pentatonic minor scale shape up a fret from A to A#, you'd get A# pentatonic minor

you'd normally refer to the notes you were playing as Bb pentatonic minor however, because Bb minor has 5 flats in the key signature & therefore easier to write and think about than A# minor, which has 7 sharps in its key signature
- on an instrument like guitar however, they're enharmonically the same thing

forget about 'learning scales for jazz' - to understand jazz you need to understand how melodies/scales work over chords

most people learn to play rock lead guitar by learning to play blues scale type licks (pentatonic minor with the addition of a flattened 5th) then gradually working out how to fit in the other notes: major 2nds, major 3rds & major 6ths are the next ones people tend to learn to use... giving you those mixolydian/dorian flavours

it depends on what kind of music you're trying to play... blues guys tend to stay using notes of the pentatonic minor of the 'home chord', even when the chords change... but this isn't appropriate for all types of music

if you want to play jazz/rock type things, many lazy jazz rockers favour modal noodling... Carlos Santana and Frank Zappa for example would set up a 1-2 chord modal vamp and widdle away in A Dorian for 20 minutes.. all notes assume the same approximate melodic value, so nothing ever sounds especially wrong...
#8
Quote by inflatablefilth
yes, if you slid your little pentatonic minor scale shape up a fret from A to A#, you'd get A# pentatonic minor

you'd normally refer to the notes you were playing as Bb pentatonic minor however, because Bb minor has 5 flats in the key signature & therefore easier to write and think about than A# minor, which has 7 sharps in its key signature
- on an instrument like guitar however, they're enharmonically the same thing

forget about 'learning scales for jazz' - to understand jazz you need to understand how melodies/scales work over chords

most people learn to play rock lead guitar by learning to play blues scale type licks (pentatonic minor with the addition of a flattened 5th) then gradually working out how to fit in the other notes: major 2nds, major 3rds & major 6ths are the next ones people tend to learn to use... giving you those mixolydian/dorian flavours

it depends on what kind of music you're trying to play... blues guys tend to stay using notes of the pentatonic minor of the 'home chord', even when the chords change... but this isn't appropriate for all types of music

if you want to play jazz/rock type things, many lazy jazz rockers favour modal noodling... Carlos Santana and Frank Zappa for example would set up a 1-2 chord modal vamp and widdle away in A Dorian for 20 minutes.. all notes assume the same approximate melodic value, so nothing ever sounds especially wrong...


Yea, basically what I said
Quote by Gummy Balls
Who the hell posts that they made up a chord on a guitar forum? He should of just called this thread " flame the shit out me".


~Founder of the Pokemon Appreciation Club~
#9
haha well im confused but i guess all the theory is quite confusing at first hopefully when i start my lessons i will start to grasp it more. but basically what your saying in regards to the initial question is that you refer to it as the flats of the notes so a sharp is the same as b flat so it would be Asharp/Bflat minor pentatonic which you just say is b flat pentatonic. And yeh i thought that the guy above was confusing minor with with flat I just didnt want to say anything thinking i would be wrong lol. cheers guys
My Beginner setup:
Ibanez rg321mh
Roland Micro cube
#10
you were right the first time, stardud just got confused for a sec
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"