#1
I've been having trouble coming up with good ideas while jazz soloing.

I like sweep picking the arpeggios that go with the chords i get messed up when i try to switch keys/scales, and also my ideas when im just improvising don't sound as "relaxed" as I want them too.

I've been using a major scale/relative minor/relative phrygian, although I've heard the Dorian mode is popular for jazz?

I need some ideas...

Oh and anybody who knows about bossa nova. What are some normal chord progressions for that? I've been playing one that is like A-7, B-, E9 And it sounds great (with the "moving bass note" idea)
John Petrucci

The one and only god.
#2
You could try grabbing a Real Book and learning some of the bossas in there. That's actually great place to go when you want to practice something new.
#3
I've been using a major scale/relative minor/relative phrygian, although I've heard the Dorian mode is popular for jazz?


The mode is determined by the underlying harmony, not the position you use. If you are playing over a C major progression, you do not have the option of A minor or E phrygian. The notes CDEFGAB are C major, regardless of the order in which you play them. If you want to learn how to play jazz, a strongly suggest picking up a good book on the subject, such as Levine's The Jazz Theory Book.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
In my opinion, the best way to get a feel for soloing in a style of music you're not used to is to learn some of the melodies and solos that the big names for that style play. Joe Pass, Bill Evans, Wes Montgomery, or more modern guys like Pat Metheny, Allan Holdsworth, etc. Find some songs you like and spend some time learning them, or even sections of them that you like. It will really help you get a feel for the way jazz guitarists use scales and licks.
#5
Quote by PSM
In my opinion, the best way to get a feel for soloing in a style of music you're not used to is to learn some of the melodies and solos that the big names for that style play. Joe Pass, Bill Evans, Wes Montgomery, or more modern guys like Pat Metheny, Allan Holdsworth, etc. Find some stuff you like and learn it for now. It will really help you get a feel for the way jazz guitarists use scales and licks.


^This

If you want to be a jazz player, transcribing and studying famous jazz solos is the best practice you will ever get.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
If you want to learn how to play jazz, a strongly suggest picking up a good book on the subject, such as Levine's The Jazz Theory Book.


Hey arch, what is this book all about? Just general basic jazz stuff? How deep does it go? I read a few reviews but I was wondering what you thought. I was looking at "Sheets of Sound," but this looks good too.
Standard Fender Telecaster
Fender Blues Jr
Ibz10
#7
Those aren't comparable books.

Sheets of Sound is a number of scale studies for the guitar. A really excellent
book, but it's not about explaining theory.

Jazz Theory is basically what it says. A description of how music can be broken
down in a jazz context. Not guitar specific (Levine is a pianist). It has snippets
of transcribed solos as examples (all standard notation).
#8
Quote by King_Arthur

Oh and anybody who knows about bossa nova. What are some normal chord progressions for that?


Reptile by Eric Clapton has a nice bossa nova feel to it. Frequently used chords in jazz and bossa nova are, namely

6/9 chords.
maj7's
min7's
7sus4's
#9
Listen to jazz. Lots of it. Get that swing feel inside you.


Learn some easy tunes, like Autumn Leaves, no key changes so you can concentrate well on what arpeggios you might use etc etc. Just practice it.


Transcribe. It's essential.


And yeah, jazz theory is a good book. Check out chord chemistry by Peter Greene.
#10
Try adding extensions to your arpeggios ie. C maj 7: C E G B D(9) F#(#11) A (13). Basically if you have a maj7 or dom7 chord just add the major triad (minor triad for m7 chords) a whole step the root of the chord to get in some nice extensions. You should then try to construct lines with these notes by connecting them chromatically and using leading tones into new chords. Also transcribe other player's lines to use in a pinch.
12 fret fury