#1
Im seriously considering getting into luthierage (?!?) but im really not sure if im 'cut' out for it. Basically i just have time on my hands and would save money because i play a lot of instruments and i have access to most tools.

Thing is all ive ever made is like a small table at school i have no other woodwork experience. I dont want to start something i cant finish. Would you say i will come across huge problems building guitars or what?!?
#3
every guitar player comes to a point where they want to be a luthier, its because guitar players are lazy and have a dream making a lot of money doing nothing.

no its not easy, you will have **** loads of problems, no you wont make any money.
#4
Quote by LP Addict
every guitar player comes to a point where they want to be a luthier, its because guitar players are lazy and have a dream making a lot of money doing nothing.

no its not easy, you will have **** loads of problems, no you wont make any money.


i dont want to make money i just dont want to pay 4000 USD for a prs custom 24 (prices here are so inflated), and also want to make mandolins, banjos, acoustics, basses eventually for my own use.

So do you luthiers consider it worth it for yourselves?!
#5
Probably. It's not so hard, but unless you have really beefy tools, you're going to tear the crap out of them. I screwed up the motor in my belt sander, and I'm now at a standstill on a customer's order.


Edit:

It's definitely worth it, It's fun, and if you're any good, you can make money off of it.
#6
Quote by CJ Noble
Probably. It's not so hard, but unless you have really beefy tools, you're going to tear the crap out of them. I screwed up the motor in my belt sander, and I'm now at a standstill on a customer's order.


i heard this and i have access to some nice tools and will buy my own. I thought belt sanders were all that was needed. Bit of elbow grease eh>?!>
#7
As posted in another thread, you need:

Bandsaw (very very helpful)
Belt sander
Drillpress
hand drill
router
table router (not required)
table saw
chisels and other wood carving tools (mainly for inlays)
dremel
and of course basic tools like rubber mallets, sand paper, etc
#8
Quote by CJ Noble
As posted in another thread, you need:

Bandsaw (very very helpful)
Belt sander
Drillpress
hand drill
router
table router (not required)
table saw
chisels and other wood carving tools (mainly for inlays)
dremel
and of course basic tools like rubber mallets, sand paper, etc


i know i was referring to belt sander...by belt sander do you mean yours is handheld or table?
#9
Definitely is possible for anyone to make a guitar. I got into building like this. one day i was looking at UG and stumbled across GB&C. I noticed all of these people who were modding squiers (seems like thats what most people were doing at the time.) So I went ahead and said hmm, maybe it'd be cool to build a guitar. So I looked some stuff up (I wasn't too prepared for it) and ended up with a pretty nice playing instrument. From there i got addicted and started really researching and built a bunch more guitars and I'm now at the point where I definitely would feel comfortable selling my work.
#10
Quote by Phazer
i know i was referring to belt sander...by belt sander do you mean yours is handheld or table?

Mine is a table belt sander.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#11
Quote by carousel182
Definitely is possible for anyone to make a guitar. I got into building like this. one day i was looking at UG and stumbled across GB&C. I noticed all of these people who were modding squiers (seems like thats what most people were doing at the time.) So I went ahead and said hmm, maybe it'd be cool to build a guitar. So I looked some stuff up (I wasn't too prepared for it) and ended up with a pretty nice playing instrument. From there i got addicted and started really researching and built a bunch more guitars and I'm now at the point where I definitely would feel comfortable selling my work.


thats cool to hear. what preperations did you miss out?!
#12
I basically went into it with pretty much no knowledge of the actual methods of building, I had no plans I just ordered my parts and started building and learned as I went.
#13
Quote by LP Addict

no its not easy, you will have **** loads of problems, no you wont make any money.


I didn't have any problems. I feel that taking time and not rushing is the most important thing to building anything. If you don't have the tools, wait till you do. Rushing screws stuff up.

I recently finished my build with no problems and only 1 or 2 frets need crowned
#14
Quote by carousel182
I basically went into it with pretty much no knowledge of the actual methods of building, I had no plans I just ordered my parts and started building and learned as I went.


so where did you have problems..neck joint/template/routing/headstock angle/trussrod etc?!?

Im definately going to do this. Im insulted that PRS charge like an extra 500 quid for bird inlays. Insane.
#15
Quote by ohspyro89
I didn't have any problems. I feel that taking time and not rushing is the most important thing to building anything. If you don't have the tools, wait till you do. Rushing screws stuff up.

I recently finished my build with no problems and only 1 or 2 frets need crowned


so do you have a bandsaw and a table sander?!?
#16
I didn't run into too many problems which is why I continued the hobby.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=499240

heres the build thread. A little embarrassing but I'll post it anyway so you can see how lucky I got that I didn't screw anything up too bad.


PRS bird inlays arent too hard to do. I wouldnt recommend them to a rookie but once you get a couple of builds under your belt youll have the wood working experience to pull it off.




I did those in the winter maybe. A few days before I broke my arm. I did a couple inlays with a full arm cast on my good arm.



that was one of them so its definitely doable for the average person. Youll notice its a little sloppy, thats because of obvious reasons. The PRS birds are pretty nice though.
#17
Quote by carousel182
I didn't run into too many problems which is why I continued the hobby.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=499240

heres the build thread. A little embarrassing but I'll post it anyway so you can see how lucky I got that I didn't screw anything up too bad.


PRS bird inlays arent too hard to do. I wouldnt recommend them to a rookie but once you get a couple of builds under your belt youll have the wood working experience to pull it off.




I did those in the winter maybe. A few days before I broke my arm. I did a couple inlays with a full arm cast on my good arm.



that was one of them so its definitely doable for the average person. Youll notice its a little sloppy, thats because of obvious reasons. The PRS birds are pretty nice though.



nice what fretboard wood is that?

i always wanted a 7up green strat. maybe its best to start on a bolt on neck
#18
The second one looks like zebrawood. First I'm not so sure about.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#19
Bolt on's are definitey the way to go for a first build. The first is bolivian rosewood and the second is zebrawood.
#20
It looks a bit light for Bolivian rosewood to me. I could be thinking of Nicaraguan rosewood though.

Anyway, my suggestion for a first build is definitely bolt on. I've heard that the more bolts you have, the better it sounds, but I haven't tested that theory because I always build neck through body now.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#21
Quote by CJ Noble
It looks a bit light for Bolivian rosewood to me. I could be thinking of Nicaraguan rosewood though.

Anyway, my suggestion for a first build is definitely bolt on. I've heard that the more bolts you have, the better it sounds, but I haven't tested that theory because I always build neck through body now.


so would you gents recommend to use crappy plywood for a first build?
#22
absolutely not. Definitely use solid wood. For your first build I'd recommend poplar, alder or basswood.
#23
Quote by carousel182
absolutely not. Definitely use solid wood. For your first build I'd recommend poplar, alder or basswood.


but i would rather do a cheap crappy thing to start with as atest
#24
It wouldn't cost too much to get a poplar body. it costs me 5-10 bucks for a poplar body blank. If your first guitar ends up nice you'll be real mad you used plywood (plywood wont be much cheaper anyway.).
#25
Remember the rainbow bass. Technically that was plywood. Extremely badass plywood, but still plywood.
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#27
True, but it would look cool.

I'm into unnecessary and counter-productive things. Like ring modulators. And my new №1 Stretch strap
1978 Peavey T-40 -> Ampeg Micro-VR - > Ampeg SVT210AV + Ampeg SVT-15E
#28
Quote by CJ Noble
Remember the rainbow bass. Technically that was plywood. Extremely badass plywood, but still plywood.


whats the rainbow bass?