#1
Hello everybody,

i've been practising pretty hard the last half year to nail alternate picking at high speeds.
Thing is : when doing chromatic exercises, i've already reached a point where i'm pretty happy with the speed i'm able to obtain - and it sounds pretty awesome too.
But ! i know that chromatic scales aren't really scales and chromatic speed runs aren't really solo's. I've been working hard on alternate picked pentatonic scales and minor scales throughout all positions possible on a 24 fretted ibanez, but i never seem to reach the speed i can obtain when doing chromatic scales.
Any ideas on breaking through this deadlock ???

Would be extremely appreciated !!!!
cheers
-b
BE
#2
the same way that you practiced chromatic excersises..i have kind of the same problem, except the opposite way. my scalar runs are fast but my chromatic runs are lacking. so i think they best way to do it it just keep practicing slowly with a metronome. unless someone else has a better solution?
#3
thanks man
maybe patience and perseverance are the keys indeed

all suggestions welcome !
-b
#4
I'd say perfect them in a slower tempo; if you can manage them, step up a bit, and continue until you are on the tempo you wished to achieve. So indeed, patience is the key. Nothing wrong with slowing down to nail it
A samurai once asked Zen Master Hakuin where he would go after he died. Hakuin answered 'How am I supposed to know?'
'How do you not know? You're a Zen master!' exclaimed the samurai.
'Yes, but not a dead one,' Hakuin answered.
#5
Chromatic runs as in 4 notes per string? More likely to be easier since each time you change string you start on the same stroke (whether it'd be up or down).

With scales, it's most likely 3 notes per string where you're gonna land on a different stroke each time you change string.

The same advice from me is SLOWLY with a metronome.

I mentioned this in another thread about practicing chromatic exercises that aren't musical - it just seems pointless since you can't use it in a musical context.
#7
Quote by brakke
Hello everybody,

i've been practising pretty hard the last half year to nail alternate picking at high speeds.
Thing is : when doing chromatic exercises, i've already reached a point where i'm pretty happy with the speed i'm able to obtain - and it sounds pretty awesome too.
But ! i know that chromatic scales aren't really scales and chromatic speed runs aren't really solo's. I've been working hard on alternate picked pentatonic scales and minor scales throughout all positions possible on a 24 fretted ibanez, but i never seem to reach the speed i can obtain when doing chromatic scales.
Any ideas on breaking through this deadlock ???

Would be extremely appreciated !!!!
cheers
-b
BE

Playing "real scales" at high speed is no more a solo than playing chromatics. You need to stop worrying about how fast you can play meaningless exercises and instead start thinking about how you can use the scales you know to create something meaningful. Scales aren't meant to be played or practiced, they're meant to be learned, understood and used to make music - they're musical, bu they aren't music.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#8
Quote by steven seagull
Playing "real scales" at high speed is no more a solo than playing chromatics. You need to stop worrying about how fast you can play meaningless exercises and instead start thinking about how you can use the scales you know to create something meaningful. Scales aren't meant to be played or practiced, they're meant to be learned, understood and used to make music - they're musical, bu they aren't music.


+5
#9
Quote by steven seagull
You need to stop worrying about how fast you can play meaningless exercises and instead start thinking about how you can use the scales you know to create something meaningful. Scales aren't meant to be played or practiced, they're meant to be learned, understood and used to make music - they're musical, bu they aren't music.


Granted, but for the purpose of 'shredding', this practice regime for the TS is necessary. Plus, you need the odd burst of speed to add excitement and give solo's a bit of a boost every so often.
#10
Quote by mdc
Granted, but for the purpose of 'shredding', this practice regime for the TS is necessary. Plus, you need the odd burst of speed to add excitement and give solo's a bit of a boost every so often.

Nothing wrong with a practice regime, it's the approach that's wrong - exercises are a means to an end, not the goal. That's why their meaningless, they're just something you do on the way to getting better at the guitar, you don't aim to get better at exercises. You have to look at what you're practicing and ask yourself what practical benefit you're getting from it.

Running a few straight scale runs is great for keeping the fingers nimble and developing dexterity and it's also a good warm up but that's it. There's no need to practice straight scales and little benefit to it - however you can construct some great exercises from them that will directly benefit your playing whils also improving your knowledge of the scale therefore helping you to use it better. There's no point chasing scale speed, you just play them at the speed you can play them.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
First, who says a chromatic speed run isn't a solo? It may not be the traditional kind, and I imagine it would be very hard to write a harmony to make it sound good, but I'd be willing to bet it's possible.

Second, simply practice what you want to get better at. Slow tempo, perfect practice, all that stuff you've been hearing from us since the dawn of time.
Those with closed minds bring on themselves nothing but limits.
#12
When you practice chromatic runs you're getting fast at the chromatic runs, which is why chromatic runs are a great warm up but nothing more. You're not going to become Malmsteen by playing 1234. You may achieve finger dexterity similar to his but you're not going to play those scalar runs mindblowingly fast because you haven't practised them.
#13
Quote by brakke
Hello everybody,

i've been practising pretty hard the last half year to nail alternate picking at high speeds.
Thing is : when doing chromatic exercises, i've already reached a point where i'm pretty happy with the speed i'm able to obtain - and it sounds pretty awesome too.
But ! i know that chromatic scales aren't really scales and chromatic speed runs aren't really solo's. I've been working hard on alternate picked pentatonic scales and minor scales throughout all positions possible on a 24 fretted ibanez, but i never seem to reach the speed i can obtain when doing chromatic scales.
Any ideas on breaking through this deadlock ???

Would be extremely appreciated !!!!
cheers
-b
BE


so you've realized that practicing unmusical chromatic exercises for speed doesn't actually help much when it comes to playing music on your musical instrument. Good for you.
Try working on music now.

Learn scales & theory
practice, listen to, and play pieces of music.


Music 1st - practice technique as needed to achieve musical goals. (you were practicing technique for techniques sake, and now you know what the result is)

Hear music: Playing something by muscle memory, without hearing it, is like talking, but not thinking about what your saying. That wouldn't make for very good conversation would it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 8, 2008,
#14
i dont think it matters how fast you play to an extent. playing guitar isnt about playing the same lick joe satriani did in surfing with the alien or anything like that its about playing with your heart. but thats not saying that you shouldnt play fast, its just saying that its alright if you dont play fast. i myself am pretty good with speed licks and scales but i play with my heart when i play blues licks and songs.
#15
Quote by brakke
Hello everybody,

i've been practising pretty hard the last half year to nail alternate picking at high speeds.
Thing is : when doing chromatic exercises, i've already reached a point where i'm pretty happy with the speed i'm able to obtain - and it sounds pretty awesome too.
But ! i know that chromatic scales aren't really scales and chromatic speed runs aren't really solo's. I've been working hard on alternate picked pentatonic scales and minor scales throughout all positions possible on a 24 fretted ibanez, but i never seem to reach the speed i can obtain when doing chromatic scales.
Any ideas on breaking through this deadlock ???

Would be extremely appreciated !!!!
cheers
-b
BE


People seem to isolate 1 tree out of the musical forest. And that tree is SPEED.
All they practice is judged by that 1 metric. The metronome is pushed faster
and faster. The only good is that which reaches the speed. All failure is that
which cannot reach the speed. Expression, note choice, rhythm, phrasing,
dynamics are all secondary or inconsequential.

There's nothing wrong with practicing technique or working on speed, but if you
don't also consider all the other elements that go into making music, what you'll
end up being able to play is speed drills and not so much music. Try seeing
the forest and I think you'll find you're not so deadlocked.