#1
Writing lyrics or writing something on guitar? What is best for you. Also give me tips on writing, i seem to have a mental block or something.
#2
for me the chords usually come first. then i build a song from this. i think for me lyrics are the last thing that happens. but i guess it all comes down to what is best for u and what works for ya.

on your writing block you just have to be patient, everyone i know that writes experiences blocks but it does come good in the end.

hope this helps
#3
i usually write lyrics first, then come up with a general melody, and then add chords and stuff. but its whatever works best for you.
#5
It really depends. Usually I'll start with a riff or chord progression on the guitar, sometimes it's a drumbeat, but once in a while a vocal melody pops in my head and I have to write a song with it. It's either rhythm or melody for me, the lyrical content usually comes later.
#6
I'd suggest for a verse, come up with some kind of chord progression or something, then write the lyrics over that. For the chorus, write the lyrics first, then make a guitar riff that will match up in some way with the singing.
#7
I try to start with a melody - or at least a phrase/fragment of one. Once I have that, I'll try to build lyrics and chords to go with it. I compare my melodic fragment idea to a seed. Work with it and it will grow and take on its own life.

Once I have a fully fledged melody and chord structure with lyrics, I'll build a riff to either go over that chord progression, or one that is based on the chord progression but one that can ultimately replace those chords if desired.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
I write whatever idea comes to my head first and build around that. That could be a guitar riff, vocal melody, lyric, chord progression, drum beat, anything really. In my experience you can't force yourself to write a good song.
#10
Some of the best songs I've ever been part of were formed by group synthesis. One person would play something, another would add, then another, then another, until we had a fully-formed song developed.
#11
Lyrics are always the very last thing for me. I come up with chords or riffs first and then experiment to find what notes and rhythms work well for the vocals. Then I write the actual words.

As for coming up with ideas...just remember that you shouldn't have to force out a song. Only go for it you're in the mood. Try listening to some new, or different sounding music if you have problems finding inspiration.
#12
A good tip for inspiration....

Go sit somewhere. A food court in a mall is great. Bring a book to stare at. Not that you'll be reading it, but people will assume you are reading it, while in reality, you're eavesdropping on various conversations going on around you.

If you're really adventurous, bring along an mp3 player with voice record function. Pretend to be listening to tunes while you record the person next to you.

Grab a conversation, turn it into a story or social observation or something and run with it.

Of course, different locations will draw different types of people, and by extension, different types of conversations.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
i see vocals/lyrics as another instrument. sometimes the guitar comes up with the first riff, verse, what have you. sometimes its the voice that starts. sometimes bass, sometimes drums. just godda let the pieces fall in place. everyone in my band has had the first building block of a song, then we all try to fit the rest in.
#14
Quote by axemanchris
A good tip for inspiration....

Go sit somewhere. A food court in a mall is great. Bring a book to stare at. Not that you'll be reading it, but people will assume you are reading it, while in reality, you're eavesdropping on various conversations going on around you.

If you're really adventurous, bring along an mp3 player with voice record function. Pretend to be listening to tunes while you record the person next to you.

Grab a conversation, turn it into a story or social observation or something and run with it.

Of course, different locations will draw different types of people, and by extension, different types of conversations.

CT


you know, thats almost creepy.....


but also an excellent idea


Onto what my band does, either one of our guitarist gets a riff, we work on it, get a lead part for it, make the rest of the instrumentals, then play it over and over while our singer finds a melody he likes, and tries to make lyrics to it.