#1
...Involving fender synchronised tremolos.

My MIM strat currently has 9-42 gauge strings, but they sound really thin and crap since i've started using 11-48 on my other guitars. You could just say "just put the 11-48s on it and shut up", but theres a lot more setup involved which is confusing me, specifically the tremolo:

Firstly, I know i'm going to have to adjust it if i put heavier strings on. the synchronised tremolo currently stays in tune perfectly, and its set up so that it can bend the pitch both ways. I'm a bit of a noob with tremolos - If i adjust this, will it screw up the tuning stability?

Secondly - it currently has 3 springs. the outer springs are angled to increase the tension, but the action of the trem is a little loose for my liking, and if i bend a string, all the others go flat momentarily until i release the bend and i'd imagine it would detune even more with heavier strings. I know this will just happen anyway with a floating trem and can't be solved completely without setting it flat, but i would like to reduce the problem a little - Would adding more springs sort this out?

I know how to adjust the tremolo, i just want these things answered before i do anything else
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#3
Quote by carpepax
By "Synchronized Tremolo," do you mean the one with the 6 pivot screws?

yes, like this one:



i forgot about the other trems its like the classic strat tremolo.

edit: changed the pic cus the first one was too big.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
Last edited by Blompcube at Aug 9, 2008,
#4
firstly: i don't think so, but i'm not an expert at setups.

secondly: more springs should help a bit, but again setups aren't exactly my forte.
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#5
Notes going out of tune while bending is inherent in almost all trem systems, some more apparent than others. I would go to four springs and tighten the spring anchor into the body a bit more than it already is (assuming it isn't all the way tight right now). If this isn't good enough, back the spring anchor back out a little bit and go to five springs.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#6
ok - i'm probably just going to try it - i can always take it to a shop and get it sorted if i screw it up - as long as it can't damage the guitar (I can't see why it would tbf), that is.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#7
i have just bought 2 more springs just in case i need them but the guy in the shop said i would only need them if i was going to be using the trem flat against the body so it can only bend the pitch down, and that i might not need any more at all - although i'm trying to stiffen the action of the trem and reduce the detuning issues with string bends.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.