#1
so everyone says in order to get better at speed, you should sit down with a metronome and start low, increase, etc. but ive also heard speed can come with time. i practice a lot, but i try to make it fun too. monotonous metronome medleys arent really that interesting. it makes you wonder, did jimmy page play with a metronome? how was it done in the old days? bottom line: do you absolutely need a metronome to improve speed, or can it be done with lots of practice?
#2
Yes, you can gain speed with time, but a metronome still helps you stay in rhythm, and gives you a real measure of speed.
#3
Not necessary, but to get to high speeds and precision it helps alot. Jimmy Page didn't play metal or "shred" like some of the new players do, it depends on what you play. Same thing goes for theory, you don't "need" it but it will make things easier.
#4
You kinda need to know how to keep in time with a metronome if you're gonna be in a band with a drummer...So yeah, it's pretty important. As for practicing, what I do is I memorize whatever it is I'm trying to memorize, and then do it to the metronome fairly slow, in triplets or 16th notes or whatever fits the piece, and speed it up. That way, you increase speed, and you can get a sense of time.


Although, honestly, I didn't start using the click until after almost 2 and a half years. Haha. But I do now, and it does help.
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#5
If you practice alot, and play everything slowly then gradually go faster, you don't need a metronome. But, it can help a little bit tho.
#6
a metronome is a timekeeper that is never wrong. if you are unable to play in time with others, then you should practice with a metronome.

a metronome can be used to provide a true representation of the speed you want to play, and can of course be used to work up to a desired level of speed.

but it is not necessary to use a metronome to increase speed. if it works for you, then great. if it doesn't, then that's great too.

playing perfectly in time is a feeling you can recognize, and if you do it enough, you can do it on demand, rather than working into it. it's all about how often you practice, and how effectively you practice.
#7
Metronomes are extremely important. If you want to record at any time in your guitar playing career, you're going to need to be able to play with a click track. PERFECTLY. If you are unable to do that, you will likely be replaced.

Playing with metronome ensures you are in time with the music.
#8
Hell yeah you could use a metronome, You say songs sound boring with a metronome but every song has one but its usually taken form in the drum kit.

Ive practiced without one and i was not bad on guitar, the only problem was that some solo's and speed playing sound awful when introduced to some backing music as i had trouble with them. I decided to not get a metronome but use one built into my PC on Guitar Pro 5, just put it on repeat. After around a month or so i learned to shred and i can sweep on 3 strings and occasionally 6, My own guitar solo skills sound awesome plus every time i play with a song it keeps me in line.

Well worth it mate. Any other comments saying you learned to shred or play fast without one, congratulations i would just like to say i did it my own way and it turned out great.

Ed.

Edit; Also for recording if you can't play a click track PERFECT you will be replaced no doubt by a session guitarist (I think it is)
#9
Quote by sgman133
it makes you wonder, did jimmy page play with a metronome? how was it done in the old days? ?


yeah he probably did, not to the extent you are implying though...metronomes have been around for longer than Led Zep

I'd say metronomes, *WHEN USED EFFECTIVELY* (can't stress that enough) make your playing tighter, more exact in a rhythmic sense, and improve your practicing routine...that having been said they are not NECESSARY- you can get extremely fast without them, will take you a LOT longer and probably a LOT more work in the long run
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#10
Quote by pepsi_lovr
Metronomes are extremely important. If you want to record at any time in your guitar playing career, you're going to need to be able to play with a click track. PERFECTLY. If you are unable to do that, you will likely be replaced.

Playing with metronome ensures you are in time with the music.

+3
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#11
Quote by PRS Eddie
Hell yeah you could use a metronome, You say songs sound boring with a metronome but every song has one but its usually taken form in the drum kit.

Ive practiced without one and i was not bad on guitar, the only problem was that some solo's and speed playing sound awful when introduced to some backing music as i had trouble with them. I decided to not get a metronome but use one built into my PC on Guitar Pro 5, just put it on repeat. After around a month or so i learned to shred and i can sweep on 3 strings and occasionally 6, My own guitar solo skills sound awesome plus every time i play with a song it keeps me in line.

Well worth it mate. Any other comments saying you learned to shred or play fast without one, congratulations i would just like to say i did it my own way and it turned out great.

Ed.

Edit; Also for recording if you can't play a click track PERFECT you will be replaced no doubt by a session guitarist (I think it is)


+1

also if you find a metronome boring try practicing with a drum machine (nothing too fancy though)
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#12
As a most-definately-beginner myself, I personally find the metronome totally priceless, especially when trying to start off with a new tab. I find playing something I already know very well ("Whole lotta Rosie", for example) slower than full tempo amazingly hard without one*, but lack the skill to play the whole thing at full pace. The metronome gives me something to hold me back during the parts I can play flat out, so I don't get into the parts where I make an arse of it going quicker than I can play them accurately. When I feel I've got it sorted at one tempo, I can then knock it up a bit in speed and try again. It really does help the precision.


* The brain knows exactly what it should sound like, and so tries to speed the fingers up to that pace. The fingers, however, aren't up to the job yet.