#1
I learned to read the staff last year because I took horn in beginning band at school, and this spring I decided it was time for me to graduate from tabs and move on to reading sheet music for guitar. One thing I've been noticing is that after I play a song or part of a song a couple times, I lose focus on sight reading. I play alot more from memory, especially if I have heard the song before.

What are some tips or things I can do so that I'm actually sight reading, and not playing from memory?
#2
Learn all your scales, arpeggios, etc. It will help you to notice patterns and train your fingers to learn more quickly. You just have to train yourself to become a better sight reader by sightreading random pieces frequently. (At least this helps me in marching band...)

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#3
when i played trumpet, i still had used memory when i played.

idk ive never had that problem much with guitar.
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#4
Prrrrrrrrrrrrractise

try playing pieces you dont know

guitar lessons are good for this as the teacher knows what is sounds like and you dont so you have to play it from the music and not memory
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#5
Focus on the dynamics of the piece itself such as crescendos, fortes and pianos, staccatos, etc. Then you'll focus not just the note itself but the feel. Also looking at all the little performance marks makes you concentrate harder and focus on the piece.
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#6
you cant "learn" to sight read, i dont think..

by definition, sight reading is completly opposite to practicing, looking for patterns etc.

since a young age playing trumpet, i never used to practice at all. this was the best thing i ever did, as when band practice comes around, you have no choice but to sight read!

i can play pretty much anything on sight reading alone.

basically, just pick a piece and blast your way through it. if something goes wrong, ignore it and carry on.

pick another piece straight after and do the same.
-Keep on listening to the great Joe Strummer. Cos through music, we can live forever.
#7
find yourself a piece of music completely new to you
and play it, don't stop when you fumble, just catch on in the next bar
don't go over the same thing more than twice in one day
and maybe reuse it for the same purpose after a week or so if you can't find anything

eventually you get the hang of it
#8
Quote by greekorican5
What are some tips or things I can do so that I'm actually sight reading, and not playing from memory?

Get the book A Modern Method For Guitar by Bill Leavitt. It contains a ton of sight reading practice and has specific reading studies that you only do infrequently so that it reinforces sight reading ability as opposed to memorization of the passages.
Last edited by :-D at Aug 9, 2008,
#9
I was and still am a drummer in addition to bass, guitar, and piano. I can tell you that the most important thing is the rhythm. Look at the tempo and the time signature to get the general feeling and mood of the piece. Look at dynamics next and then focus on notes and what scale it's on.
It takes forever, to learn how to do sight reading well and the only way you'll know you're any good is if you keep looking at new pieces. They don't even need to be that long.Something thats a couple of measures will do. Or you could just get one piece of music and break it down into sections and see if you can sightread it.
#11
Yeah, to get good at sight reading, you gotta just do it. All this dynamics and stuff people are spewing just isn't going to help.

From my earliest days playing viola in orchestra, I have been told (and now tell people) that the goal of sight-reading is simply to play the notes IN TIME as best you can.

What you should do is HAVE A METRONOME, set your tempo, as slow as you need. You want to pick a BPM that you think will allow you to play the entire piece without stopping once at all. With some of the stuff I work on (which is pretty complex and chromatic), I will even start at like 30 BPM. The key is to not stop. Even when you screw up, keep counting time, and come back in when you think you can. You want to keep your place don't stop moving forward.

You can really only sight-read something once. After that you'll have some semblance of it memorized, even the atonal, non-melodic exercises I do I remember a bit of. But either way, once you've sight read it, it can't hurt to sit down and learn it, and work up the tempo. It'll help you either way.

So to get good at sight reading, make like Nike and "Just do it."
#12
Quote by :-D
Get the book A Modern Method For Guitar by Bill Leavitt. It contains a ton of sight reading practice and has specific reading studies that you only do infrequently so that it reinforces sight reading ability as opposed to memorization of the passages.



i was going to recomend this... its a great book for site reading. just pick a random peice and play it. It has a heap of duets too