#1
Hey guys,
I'm a fairly experienced bassist, but not a very experienced soloist. I have been told "For this song, we're giving you a solo of 3 chorus's" (in jazz lingo of course) so I've been experimenting with it. The song is Comin' Home Baby, and my chorus consists of:


||:E min|%|%|%|A Min|%|E min|%|G7|F#7 F7|E min|%:|| X3

% Meaning repeating last chord, and :| denotating repeats

So I was thinking about what scales I should screw around with... I'm thinking B Phrygian would work fairly well? or maybe D mixo, but I was wondering what some people more experienced in soloing would use to approach the solo.
Thanks
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#2
Do you know what key the song is in?
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#3
E minor (1 Sharp)
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#4
I would definately do something in the key of E minor for it.

Such as: E F# G A B C D

And then I would probably throw in an F on the F7 right before it goes back to E minor.
#5
Uh, the reason I picked those scales is because E minor is the relative minor to G Major, and share all of the same notes, so B Phrygian and D Mixo would share all of those notes as well.
I don't want to hit roots in this solo, because as a bass player, that's what I do every other time, and I'm not doing that in a solo. It'd be much, much too boring that way.

Edit: I was also considering using some triad couplings using either ascending or descending arpeggios, I'm just not sure which key I'd pick it in... D altered may work
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Last edited by TomD03 at Aug 10, 2008,
#6
Quote by TomD03
Uh, the reason I picked those scales is because E minor is the relative minor to G Major, and share all of the same notes, so B Phrygian and D Mixo would share all of those notes as well.
I don't want to hit roots in this solo, because as a bass player, that's what I do every other time, and I'm not doing that in a solo. It'd be much, much too boring that way.

It doesn't matter what you hit, what matters is the harmonic context. They have the same notes, but modes are defined by the harmony; your tonal center isn't B, so you're not playing B Phrygian. You missed what he was trying to say.
#7
Quote by :-D
It doesn't matter what you hit, what matters is the harmonic context. They have the same notes, but modes are defined by the harmony; your tonal center isn't B, so you're not playing B Phrygian. You missed what he was trying to say.


I'm aware, and as I mentioned in my edit, I don't want to play the "tonal center."
I want to make harmonies which are strange, otherwise it's just another bass solo people twiddle their thumbs to if I just keep hitting the root.
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#8
Quote by TomD03
I'm aware, and as I mentioned in my edit, I don't want to play the "tonal center."
I want to make harmonies which are strange, otherwise it's just another bass solo people twiddle their thumbs to if I just keep hitting the root.

As the soloist, I repeat, you are not defining the tonal center in this case. The underlying harmony determines the tonal center, and you play over it. For example, I don't see how you could think you're playing B Phrygian when there's no chord rooted on B in the harmony. If you want to make "strange harmonies", think more in intervals than scales.
#9
Quote by :-D
As the soloist, I repeat, you are not defining the tonal center in this case. The underlying harmony determines the tonal center, and you play over it. For example, I don't see how you could think you're playing B Phrygian when there's no chord rooted on B in the harmony. If you want to make "strange harmonies", think more in intervals than scales.



Um, well if what's playing underneath is defining the tonal center, then I should have the freedom to move outside if if they are maintaining it. Is that not what players such as John Coltrane did in many of his solos? I mean, I listen to songs such as "Countdown" and he's not simply playing the "tonal center" scale as you guys seem to be talking about.
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#10
Quote by TomD03
Um, well if what's playing underneath is defining the tonal center, then I should have the freedom to move outside if if they are maintaining it. Is that not what players such as John Coltrane did in many of his solos? I mean, I listen to songs such as "Countdown" and he's not simply playing the "tonal center" scale as you guys seem to be talking about.



You're not listening. I never said you couldn't play outside a little bit, of course you can; I'm just saying that you're not using the modes that you think you're using.
#11
Alright, forgive me for my ignorance as a soloist (as I said, bass player, used to making smooth lines, not solos), and due to it being about 1:30 in the morning; I return to my original question: I was wondering what some people more experienced in soloing would use to approach the solo.
with the added: And why?
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#12
In Jazz, many soloists approach each chord as an island; play whatever scale sounds best over each chord.

That is a chromatic progression, so you will have to change scales at some point, anyway.
#13
Well, as a bassist, I'm assuming during your solo it's gonna be just you and the drummer? If so, you've got quite a bit of freedom. You can drone an E note and play any E mode, that kinda thing if you wanted. To be honest, you can do whatever the hell you want as long as the last couple bars before the band comes back in vaguely resembles the harmony it's supposed to.

However, for something that fits, it's a bluesy minor tune. I'd recommend using the E blues scale or maybe E Dorian or E Minor.