#1
So I want to record a video to get some constructive criticism and how I can improve on playing. But I'm not really sure on how to make a guitar video.

So I have a few questions:

If I record with a mic, how would I take a video and record it with a mic at the same time, the mic is not connected to the camera, its connected to the computer.

Is there anything that can improve the sound of my recording.

Although, I'm not using any real mic, I'm attempting to use the Rock Band Mic.

Any input/contributions are appreciated. Thanks in Advance
#2
Use the cameras mic. Sound quality is not important if you're looking for criticism on your playing., and not what you're playing.
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#3
You could mic up the amp and record that with the computer and record your playing separately with the camera. Then just sync up the good quality audio from the mic with the low quality audio from the camera and mute the camera's audio. Do that with Windows Movie Maker, unless you're a Mac person then use whatever the Mac equivalent is.
#4
Record audio and video at the same time but separately. This is how the pros do it and I do it this way all the time. See my videos (sig link) for an idea on how my video quality is.

Once you get both the audio and video recorded link the camera to the computer and capture the video into an editing program of your choice. Next fix the audio up and export it as a .wav file. Import that to your video editing program as well.

When filming I will clap my hands once so I have something to sync the audio and video with when editing.

Export your video as a Quicktime .mov format in 640x480. Youtube will take up to 1GB of video files now even though its not currently stated.

I run Adobe Premiere CS3 but I do a lot of video work so its a high end program. Most home users could get by with something like Windows Movie Maker.

Record with good gear if you want good sound quality. You can try to EQ and compress the audio a little in post production however its always best to get good sound from the start.

I also see a lot of people overlook lighting when it comes to videos. Light from the front where the camera is and put out plenty of light to reduce "noise" or "grain" in the video. Most cameras will have an exposure adjustment which you can turn down if there's too much light on the screen. It's best to blast the set with light and turn it down on the camera for best video quality. Also remember to white balance manually if your camera has this feature. Lower end cameras will do this on their own and I find they dont work out too well...


When on smaller jobs I will be running a camera (usually in the $3,000 range) and they have XLR mic inputs on board so we can run a shotgun mic or mount a short shotgun mic to the camera itself. This usually is done for smaller budget shows. Higher budgets will allow everyone to record and edit on a ProTools HD setup and transfer everything directly into Avid video editor.
Last edited by moody07747 at Aug 10, 2008,
#5
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
Use the cameras mic. Sound quality is not important if you're looking for criticism on your playing., and not what you're playing.

I hate to rubbish other peoples opinions, but that is pretty ridiculous man I have to say, when someone who knows what they're talking about is listening/critiquing your playing, they're going to be paying attention to every nuance and subtlety in your playing, without great audio quality this is next to impossible. Anyone who is critiquing what you're playing needs to be able to here everything you play clearly and concisely, you certainly can't judge someones playing from visuals alone, if people only watched Jimmy Page playing without actually listening to what he was playing he would come across as a horrible guitarist, his technique is absolutely all over the place, but as you can hear in his playing it still comes together fairly nicely.
I'm the new king
I taste the queen
In here we are all anemic
In here, anemic and sweet
#6
...so you would need a brilliant recording to be able to tell that Segovia was a master? Or you couldn't tell, even from a crap recording, that Cobain was basically a hacker?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
IMO quality isn't a #1 priority in this case, sure it's a nice thing to have in any video but most video camera mics are fairly good and you see videos like that all over YouTube. You can still hear what they are playing.

So try it with the camera mic first and see how it comes out but as I said, if you have the cash a higher quality audio signal is a nice feature in any video.
#8
Quote by axemanchris
...so you would need a brilliant recording to be able to tell that Segovia was a master? Or you couldn't tell, even from a crap recording, that Cobain was basically a hacker?

CT

Well we aren't talking about being able to tell the difference between a 'master' and a 'hacker', we're talking about being able to here what he is playing clearly to be able to provide constructive criticism in relation to technique, tone etc. And with a lot of videos on YouTube its next to impossible to hear exactly what they're doing. That's just my opinion, there's no point getting into a heated argument, because like a lot of things in recording there's no right or wrong answer, or an answer at all for that matter. But realistically, you'll get more constructive feedback if they can here what you're doing clearly.
I'm the new king
I taste the queen
In here we are all anemic
In here, anemic and sweet