#1
Well, i have a beginners 10 watt sx amp with treble, mid, and bass. i was wondering what settings i would need to put my amp on for these sounds and bands using only bass, mid and treble:

smashing pumpkins

punk (blink 182, sum 41, boxcar racer)

children of bodom (something wild era)

parkway drive

bullet for my valentine

metallica

canon rock

can you guys please help me out?
#2
well dude i have only been playing for about a month and a half, but i think blink uses alot of mid, at least it sounds like it on their songs but im not sure
D;
#3
For your Parkway Drive, BFMV, and Bodom-like tones, try setting your treble at 6, mid at about 3, and your bass at 6 or 7, and then toy around with it a bid to find something you like.
#5
nobody can hear through your ears but you. starting off id try one all the way up at a time with the other two at zero to get an idea of what the different frequencies do to your sound and then try the amp with all set to 12 o'clock (halfway up no boost or cut) and tweak em and play some and repeat several times till you find your personal prefrences. starting out it might help to write down settings you like and maybe a few notes about the sound (like a sound from a certain band or song or just something you like) and why you like it untill you get the hang of it. favorite two on mine are trebble and mid all the way up and bass fully cut and full trebble and bass with mid down to 2 or so. but all amps and ears are different...
#6
If I were you, just set all of them halfway (5) and move them up and down until you find something suitable. It'll help you tell between good tone and bad tone yourself.

Also, for the metal, try cutting the mids a bit (Treb & Bass high, Mids low). It's an easy cheat for a metal-chug kind of tone (although a lot of people are against this method).

Also, +1 to the Ultimate settings link.
#7
Quote by roshjosh
Ultimate settings thread

I'm not usually a dick like this, but you can find some great information in there.


yeah i looked through the ultimate settings thread, but they post settings for amps with gain and reverb too, which i don't have.
#8
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
nobody can hear through your ears but you. starting off id try one all the way up at a time with the other two at zero to get an idea of what the different frequencies do to your sound and then try the amp with all set to zero and tweak em and play some and repeat several times till you find your personal prefrences. starting out it might help to write down settings you like and maybe a few notes about the sound (like a sound from a certain band or song or just something you like) and why you like it untill you get the hang of it. favorite two on mine are trebble and mid all the way up and bass fully cut and full trebble and bass with mid down to 2 or so. but all amps and ears are different...


No. Put the EQ dials at five (straight up, basically), and tweak from there. That way there is no boost or reduction in the frequencies and he can get the more "balanced" EQ into his head as a sort of point of reference. Also, if you play with a band, think again before putting your mid-range down, as it can be hard to get through the mix of drums, bass, and whatever with only treble. That, and guitar is a mid-range instrument.

Quote by roshjosh
Ultimate settings thread

I'm not usually a dick like this, but you can find some great information in there.


True, though the thread quickly becomes tedious past the actual list. It devolves into a bunch of people asking and not enough people answering, or people just adding miscellaneous settings they found (like I did...).


EDIT:

Gain is only there to get the right amount of dirt to the EQ. The EQ is much more important. Also, reverb is just an effect for taste, as in some people don't use it, whereas others put tons in (like in a lot of surf). If the amp is a tube (which I have a feeling it isn't) just turn the master volume way up and you'll get that tube overdrive, which is beautiful gain. My '77 Peavey 30w is reverb-less as well, but reverb pedals aren't too-too expensive. That and I have a 150x '85 Gorilla with gain and reverb, though the reverb sometimes cuts out for whatever reason.

Anyway, my point is, if you want EQ settings, worry about the EQ, don't worry about gain and reverb.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs
Last edited by Chris_Parker at Aug 9, 2008,
#9
Quote by Chris_Parker
No. Put the EQ dials at five (straight up, basically), and tweak from there. That way there is no boost or reduction in the frequencies and he can get the more "balanced" EQ into his head as a sort of point of reference. Also, if you play with a band, think again before putting your mid-range down, as it can be hard to get through the mix of drums, bass, and whatever with only treble. That, and guitar is a mid-range instrument.


True, though the thread quickly becomes tedious past the actual list. It devolves into a bunch of people asking and not enough people answering, or people just adding miscellaneous settings they found (like I did...).

You sir are a moron. 12 o clock referes to a CLOCK and if youve ever seen one you would find the 12 to be at the top which is where the knobs point with no boost or cut. If you cant read time you should still be able to see what i mean unless you arent familiar with the numbers themselves either.
#10
Quote by MichaelOfCanton
You sir are a moron. 12 o clock referes to a CLOCK and if youve ever seen one you would find the 12 to be at the top which is where the knobs point with no boost or cut. If you cant read time you should still be able to see what i mean unless you arent familiar with the numbers themselves either.



You're right. It would be moronic if I said five o'clock was straight up, wouldn't it? Unfortunately, I didn't. I said "5" as in "1-10".

I was talking about how if you put the dials all the way up, you're boosting the frequencies, as opposed to having them at five, or "12 o'clock", if you want, will give you a somewhat even signal. it may not sound the best to some, but that is the best tweaking point, as you can see which ranges you like and want to boost, and which you don't.


So get off your high horse and learn that there are different ways to annotate positions of a dial besides in o'clock.

EDIT:
Turning one knob all the way up with the others down is pointless, because you don't get the relation with the rest of the ranges, and you may find that having the mids all the way up with the bass and treble elsewhere may not sound good to you.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs
Last edited by Chris_Parker at Aug 9, 2008,