#1
I'm the vocalist for a metalcore band, and after much frustration in finding that the band's guitarist can't really write, I've decided to help. Everyone was taking the approach of let's just mess around and see what sounds good.

I however have been learning a bit of theory, but still not a tremendous amount. I have just a few questions regarding scales and such. I'll try to bold the main point of each question.

My band plays in drop B, does that mean that only scales like B Major Penatonic or B Melodic Minor would work? I've messed around with scales corresponding to B and they've sounded great, but I'm wondering if it's "okay" (musically) to diverge from scales named B in this case.

I'm looking for some variety between songs, and within songs themselves. It's not necessary to remain in the same scale for an entire song, is it? Could I use one scale for an intro, another for verses, and a third for choruses? If so, is there any method to finding which scales complement other scales in a tonal sense?

Lastly, does anyone know of any scales often used in Metal/Hardcore music? I'm not just talking about in solos, but just in riffs and such.


Again, I'm really sorry if these are all no-brainer questions to you, but for me they aren't.
#2
Drop B simply means the lowest string of the guitar is tuned down to B. It's just a lower tuning, any scales can still be used, regardless of whether they're B or not.

Also, you don't have to be in the same scale for the entire song. You'll want to have some consistency (like, changing scales every few seconds probably won't work so well), but one or two changes should be fine. And remember: scales are pretty much suggestions of which notes sound good together. You can always go outside of a scale for one or two notes, just make sure it sounds good.

Those are the only ones I can answer. Hope I helped.
#3
Well, drop B tuning is B F# B E G# C# so you drop more than just the lowest string, does that matter?

Thank you for clarifying the second question. =)
#4
Nope drop B is just the tuning your in. It in no way in no way affects the key your song can be in. Mess around with some powerchords or some melody lines. Think of something you want to hear in your head and try to replicate it on the guitar.
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#5
Quote by PhillyC
Well, drop B tuning is B F# B E G# C# so you drop more than just the lowest string, does that matter?

Thank you for clarifying the second question. =)

No, thats Drop D tuned down 1 1/2 steps (so the lowest string is B). Someone correct me if I'm wrong. But either way, tuning doesn't determine the scales you can play, it just changes where on the fretboard you play them. It also lets you play lower scales, but in no way does it restrict what scales you can play.

Glad I could help, and hope I cleared this up a little more.