#1
So i bought a guitar a couple weeks ago. An Ibanez 260 FM. Nice intermediate guitar I loved it. the stock strings didn't last long so I bout some Elixers. A cousin got um for me so I don't know the gauge of the strings. But the thickness was .10 - .46. Or something like that.
I put um on and tuned it to standard and the bridge was really tilted like this "/", down towards the pick ups. It was tilted up at least a cm and a half, i could actually get my finger in it. So then i started to tune it down after i realized and then my high e string broke... From tuning down? WTF right? But it was in drop C before the bridge actually went down, and even then it wasn't all the way.

So like whats going on? Are they faulty strings, could it be possible they were high gauge strings but in the wrong box? Or is my Ibanez messed? Also is that much tension on the bridge ok for it?

Thanks in advance for any advice.
#2
Quote by Bubbles516
So i bought a guitar a couple weeks ago. An Ibanez 260 FM. Nice intermediate guitar I loved it. the stock strings didn't last long so I bout some Elixers. A cousin got um for me so I don't know the gauge of the strings. But the thickness was .10 - .46. Or something like that.
I put um on and tuned it to standard and the bridge was really tilted like this "/", down towards the pick ups. It was tilted up at least a cm and a half, i could actually get my finger in it. So then i started to tune it down after i realized and then my high e string broke... From tuning down? WTF right? But it was in drop C before the bridge actually went down, and even then it wasn't all the way.



Quote by Bubbles516
like whats going on?


The tension from the strings after tuning up your 10's was bigger than that of the springs in the back, as they are set by the factory for 9's. This made your bridge rise up.


There are mutiple explanation for the broken high E.

One of those explanations is that tuning down the other strings put too much pressure on the high E. Allow me to explain: when you tune down one string (let's say the low E) you'll find that with tremolo equipped guitars the remaining strings will go up in pitch. If you tune down starting at the low E, by the time you've worked your way up to the treble strings, the pressure on the high E might have already been too high.

Quote by Bubbles516
Are they faulty strings,


Could be. As someone from a major string manufacturer once told me "making strings isn't rocket science". Of course every company tries to have a good quality control, but sometimes a faulty string slips through. On top of that, strings can spend quite some time on the shelf before they're put on a guitar.

In combination with the added tension (see above) this might have caused the break.


You can always contact Elixir and tell them about the problem. If you're lucky, you might get a free replacement or maybe a free set.


Quote by Bubbles516
could it be possible they were high gauge strings but in the wrong [box?


Not very likely.


Quote by Bubbles516
is my Ibanez messed?


Well, a common problem is that a saddle can develop a small burr or imperfection, causing a string to break. If the string broke at the bridge, check the saddle; if you find a small spot which might have snapped the string you can use light sand paper to get rid of it (there are plenty of turtorials online).

If you're not sure, just put on a new string. If the same string keeps breaking in the same spot, it's most likely a bridge related problem.


Quote by Bubbles516
is that much tension on the bridge ok for it?


10's tuned up to standard should be fine.

When the guitar is in tune you can adjust the bridge using the two big screws in tremolo cavity (attached to the metal plate holding the springs). If you tighten these screws (keeping the plate straight) the bridge will lower. Remember to retune frequently during the process to check your progress; eventually you'll get it perfectly flush with the surface of the body.


Good luck and keep in mind that this particular break might have been caused by a combination of things, like an old string (after spending ages in the music store) and a small imperfection on the saddle , etc.

You might want to try just putting a new string on to see if the problem reoccurs.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
Last edited by Bonsaischaap at Aug 10, 2008,