#1
hi, my band have been recording music with different methodes, we now bought a new microphone ( This One )

I didn't buy it from that site, I bought it from a shop, the guy working there recommended it, i've so far only used it for tests and I realised that when I record (with audacity) the recorded sound is REALLY silent, and somehow the volume is normal when I put the mic right next to the amp (the quality is still really good), my question is, how can I record my full band playing???

I've found some answers, which do you think is best??:

1) record each instrument seperatly by putting the mic right next to the amp/instrument and playing at normal volume.

2) record each instrument individually at normal volume, by putting the mic away from the amp/instrument and afterwoods amplifying with audacity

3) record each instrument individually at a very high volume and put the mic away from the amp/instrument

4) record the full band (drums, rythm guitar, lead guitar and piano, maybe vocals) by putting the mic in the middle of the room away from the amps/instruments, playing at normal volume and then amplifying with audacity

5) record the full band by putting the mic in the middle of the room, away from the amps/instruments but playing at a very high volume

those are our 5 options, each haas an up and downside, could anyone here suggest which method would be best???

also, when recording with this mic there is no feedback, and it only picks up backgroud noises that are really loud, it doesnt pick up talking unless you talk into the mic.

thanks in advance.

-tdn
#2
Depends. Do you want your band playing together? multi-track can be great, but only if you want it that way. otherwise, you could buy a few more mics.

by the way, you should use an instrument mic for amps and such. When you have one, you place the mic directly in front of your amp (like actually touching the front) and adjust from there.
Last edited by restless_thrash at Aug 10, 2008,
#3
Instead of buying all these mics, buy an overall portable recorder, such as a Zoom H4 and so forth, i did, and i love my zoom inspite of hating the actual brand zoom with a passion :p

It's a really good recorder, great quality/.
#4
Quote by Anthony1991
Instead of buying all these mics, buy an overall portable recorder, such as a Zoom H4 and so forth, i did, and i love my zoom inspite of hating the actual brand zoom with a passion :p

It's a really good recorder, great quality/.


you could do that too.
#6
Individually recording each person/instrument will allow for sound to be edited post recording. This will make it easier to have a higher quality recording. If you wanted to do the multi track get a interface that allows for mult. inputs and hook up a few more mikes. (also this must be firewire interface because usb will only transmit 2 channels at once)

as for distance and volume. . . you are going to have to play around with the mic on your own. It really depends on your room, the accoustics, what sound you are going for. The farther away the mic is the more "room ambience" you will have in your sound. Whatever you do for one instrument you will prolly have to do for all of them. (in general) If you dont the different sounds will sound like they were recorded in different places. You will not have the same amount of space in each sound. HOWEVER not doing this can be a great way to get sounds to pop if that is the desired effect.


Good luck with the recording project.

Good Links:
www.tweakheadz.com
#7
From what you are describing, that mic isn't very good at all. You'd probably get much more usable results using the Zoom. We use the H2 (most of the features, half the price) to record our rehearsals and it's a really good little unit.

By the sounds of it, none of those methods - with that mic - are going to give you better results.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.