#1
I have a chord:

D - G - A - Db
1 - 4 - 5 - 7

Now that i concluded as a D major 7 with an added 4th but it lacks the major 3rd. This kinda makes it a little lifeless with the D major scale in terms of the majory feel. But i really like the sound of this voicing i stumbled accross.

I also considered it to be a possible A Major b7 which would suit for G major, how ever again that would make its formula:

1-3-4-b7. Theres no perfect 5th involved... so it didn't sound right with that scale either. So I am kinda stuck now. Does it require the 3rd in its formula for it to work with a major scale.

Or have i got something wrong?
#4
Well I think 1-4-5-7 would be maj7sus4 lol if there is such a chord.
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#6
lol I actually spent some time on this and I don't know what the chord actually is but you can solo over that in A mixolydian.
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#7
Quote by NnjRik
when in doubt PENTATONIC!


Possibly but a song with just pentatonics is rather bland... im wanting to use a nice majorly mode.

Yes i did think major 7 sus 4 but did not think there were such a scale/mode position that would fit?
#8
It is actually D G A C#, because it is formed from a diationic scale. But still, you would call it a Dmaj7sus. And you should use the major scale when soloing with it. You could get away with the melodic minor, but I somehow doubt you will be able to with your amount of theoretical knowledge.
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#9
How long does this chord get played for?

An Arpeggio would be the obvious choice and the just flesh round as you felt sounded ok.

Are there other chords as that would define the harmony a bit more.
#10
Quote by Iron_Dude
It is actually D G A C#, because it is formed from a diationic scale. But still, you would call it a Dmaj7sus. And you should use the major scale when soloing with it. You could get away with the melodic minor, but I somehow doubt you will be able to with your amount of theoretical knowledge.



Melodic Minor? I think you mean harmonic. It contains a C# as you said, therefore harmonic minor would work better. It is neither a Major or Minor chord as there is no 3rd, but a major tonality is implied by the major 7th.
#11
Melodic Minor has a flat 3rd which could fill in the missing gap (the missing 3rd of the chord) as could the major, and harmonic minor? Or do you mean harmonic major?

Thinking about it, they all work. But theres always one note that seems slightly out. Looks like i will have to just avoid hitting that note.
#12
Quote by Pagan-Pie
Melodic Minor? I think you mean harmonic. It contains a C# as you said, therefore harmonic minor would work better. It is neither a Major or Minor chord as there is no 3rd, but a major tonality is implied by the major 7th.

Actually, both scales contain the 1 4 5 and 7, so they both could work over this tonally ambiguous chord.

And yes, you probably should use the major scale, but that doesn't mean you can't use a minor scale with a natural 7 (i.e. melodic and harmonic minor).
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Last edited by Iron_Dude at Aug 10, 2008,
#13
Quote by thefollower
I have a chord:

D - G - A - Db
1 - 4 - 5 - 7

Now that i concluded as a D major 7 with an added 4th but it lacks the major 3rd. This kinda makes it a little lifeless with the D major scale in terms of the majory feel. But i really like the sound of this voicing i stumbled accross.

I also considered it to be a possible A Major b7 which would suit for G major, how ever again that would make its formula:

1-3-4-b7. Theres no perfect 5th involved... so it didn't sound right with that scale either. So I am kinda stuck now. Does it require the 3rd in its formula for it to work with a major scale.

Or have i got something wrong?


Context? What are other chords in your progression?
Quote by Johnljones7443
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#14
D - G - A - Db
1 - 4 - 5 - 7

ok ive noticed the weird tuning, and im just going to translate it to E just for me to concentrate. Its going to be on a higher octave, but the same pitch

so

E - A - D - G
11 13 12 - 14

which translates to

D# - A# - D - A

It depends on which note you choose as a root. the root doesnt always have to be the bass note (D#).

if you choose D as a root, you have a minor second (m2) D#, a 4th A, a b5th A#.

So you can play in D locrian and D Blues.

which means if you choose A as the root, you can play in A phrygian and A Pentatonic Minor

A# as root = A# lydian, A# Blues

and D# as root = D#Maj, D#Mixolydian and D#pentatonic Maj.


sorry i couldnt explain it in your weird tuning.
#15
Im in E standard tuning..why did you assume i wasn't you confused me lol


Quote by DarTHie
Context? What are other chords in your progression?



Thats the only chord, it strums in the background and rings in ambient way, its so i can play scales over it and learn how harmony works with scales and chords but when i came accross this chord I couldn't hear any scale that distinctively fitted.
Last edited by thefollower at Aug 10, 2008,
#16
Quote by Iron_Dude
Actually, both scales contain the 1 4 5 and 7, so they both could work over this tonally ambiguous chord.

And yes, you probably should use the major scale, but that doesn't mean you can't use a minor scale with a natural 7 (i.e. melodic and harmonic minor).


The melodic minor only contains the C# on the ascent, therefore using that scale would be pointless...
#17
Some scales/modes that contain 1 4 5 7: Ionian, Harmonic Minor, Melodic Minor...

So try them, try concentrating on above tones, use arpeggios, find out what sounds good over it.
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#18
Quote by NnjRik
when in doubt PENTATONIC!

i totally agree! pentatonic has saved my bacon hundreds of times!
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#19
Quote by Pagan-Pie
The melodic minor only contains the C# on the ascent, therefore using that scale would be pointless...


Unless you want to use the C# on the ascent...

Melodic minor contains a b6. Period. The reason it is often played differently ascending and descending is because, in certain genres (such as classical music), it is treated more as an alteration to the minor scale rather than a scale in its own right. It was created for the sole reason of eliminating the augmented second interval in harmonic minor, which was accomplished by raising the sixth degree when ascending towards the seventh, and lowering both degrees when descending towards the fifth. As a scale, there is no obligation to play it different ascending and descending.
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