#1
so I go to jam this weekend in a bar, even though of my age, and well i arrive with my guitar, and well all the setup was there already, amps drums etc... so one of my good friend says are you in 440, or 435, i was like WTF? so he says ah just gimme your guitar illl set it ready


is 440 a way to say standard and 335 Eb ?

practical explanation please!
#3
440 is the ehm... frequency i think? to which the note A is tuned. That's the standard for all tunings. Some orchestras tune to a little over 440 to get an overal "happier" sound and down for a "darker" one.

However if you tune to something other than 440 it'll sound flat/sharp (doesn't mean it'll be exactly a semitone up/down). Some chromatic tuners can be adjusted to change the calibration.

Check out The White Stripes' "Blue Orchid." I believe it's tuned higher than 440 and that's why it's got that sound that makes it sound a little sharp.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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#4
Quote by ESPplayer5150
A440 is standard and 335 im guessing is dropped tuning

Nope...

I'll look for a chart demonstrating how it works out.

EDIT: Like i said, 440 is the frequency in Hz to which the A above middle C is tunned to. This is the formula for determinging pitch:



Here is a list of the frequencies of notes. If you would've tuned to another frequency then you'd have to have to use the formula i mentioned in order to find out the new frequency for each note.

As you can see, semitones do not fall in whole (442, 364, 459) frequencies. That means that to tune to Eb you'd have to tune to a frequency of 415.30Hz if i'm not mistaken.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
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Last edited by evening_crow at Aug 10, 2008,
#5
You mentioned 335 AND 435 there. Either way it makes no difference, neither are the frequiencies of any standard musical note. 335Hz would be somwhere between an E and an F, 435Hz between Ab and A. He was talking rubbish I would have to say.
#6
Quote by ray555
He was talking rubbish I would have to say.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concert_pitch

not rubbish.

different people use different frequencies for the A above middle C. it's important that all instruments use the same frequency for that A otherwise they'll sound slightly out of tune.
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Quote by element4433
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#7
What he was referring to was the calibration of his tuner.

A440 is "in tune". The problem arises when you are playing with instruments that aren't easy to tune (aka a piano). What people will do then is find what calibration makes the piano "in tune" on the tuner and then have the rest of the band tune to that.
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Quote by utsapp89
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#8
Quote by Lemoninfluence
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concert_pitch

not rubbish.

different people use different frequencies for the A above middle C. it's important that all instruments use the same frequency for that A otherwise they'll sound slightly out of tune.


I know that, I've completed many essays on the topic, and no one playing a gig in a pub can honestly come out with ' are you in 440 or 335', there is absolutely no standard that is benched on 335 or 435Hz.
#9
Quote by ray555
I know that, I've completed many essays on the topic, and no one playing a gig in a pub can honestly come out with ' are you in 440 or 335', there is absolutely no standard that is benched on 335 or 435Hz.

for all you know the house piano could be in that (435hz) tuning and anyone playing there is expected to know this and tune their instrument accordingly. It was a jam session not a gig, I assume house musicians will be there too.

sure 435 isn't a common pitch now but that doesn't mean it can't be used. although it is slightly random to come out with that particular pitch, it doesn't mean that he's automatically talking rubbish.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#10
If the case was an outside circumstance, like you say having to tune to their piano or whatever instrument, he wouldn't have came out with a random frequency like that though. My long and short is that 440Hz is really the only frequency anyone need know how to tune to. If your tuning to an instrument, that's fine but calling out random frequencies is a bit much. No one cares what frequency the oboe is in in an orchestra, you just tune to it.
#11
Quote by ray555
If the case was an outside circumstance, like you say having to tune to their piano or whatever instrument, he wouldn't have came out with a random frequency like that though. My long and short is that 440Hz is really the only frequency anyone need know how to tune to. If your tuning to an instrument, that's fine but calling out random frequencies is a bit much. No one cares what frequency the oboe is in in an orchestra, you just tune to it.



i messed up i was talking about 440 and 435

just a mistake of my part

also its not an orchestra im playing with, its 2 guitars a bass a drum and some vocals, it was like a show buy that anybody could jam and i was a guest

i guess the 435 tuning is just to help the lead singer who cant reach higher notes
#12
Some people when they tune, mostly orchestras, have a different pitch they use for notes. For example, Dimebag would tune his guitar a quarter step down from whatever the regular tuning would be.

Also, Layla is a quarter step up from contert pitch (A=440hz)

Quote by ray555
If the case was an outside circumstance, like you say having to tune to their piano or whatever instrument, he wouldn't have came out with a random frequency like that though. My long and short is that 440Hz is really the only frequency anyone need know how to tune to. If your tuning to an instrument, that's fine but calling out random frequencies is a bit much. No one cares what frequency the oboe is in in an orchestra, you just tune to it.

I have never understood why they do that, wouldn't it make more sense to tune to an instrument like an organ or some keyboard type instrument?

Oh well, no dissuading tradition.
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Last edited by SG Man Forever at Aug 10, 2008,
#13
Well ochestras usually will tune off the oboe, or maybe a piano if there're playing together because you arent going to start tuning the piano to the violins, that would be silly really. Usually they will tune to one instrument or go off into rooms in their sections and tune to concert pitch. They use the oboe because it is seen to hold its tuning the best out of the orchestral instruments.
#14
Quote by ray555
Well ochestras usually will tune off the oboe, or maybe a piano if there're playing together because you arent going to start tuning the piano to the violins, that would be silly really. Usually they will tune to one instrument or go off into rooms in their sections and tune to concert pitch. They use the oboe because it is seen to hold its tuning the best out of the orchestral instruments.


Like I said, it just seems to make more sense (to me) to use an instrument like a piano, since it's so goddamn hard to tune.
ALWAYS

WANNA BE WITH YOU,
MAKE BELIEV
E WITH YOU,
AND L
IVE IN HARMONY, HARMONY,



OH, LOOVE!