#1
ok so if I got a chord progression for a verse Em, Am , G, D if I'm writing a melody for it. should I / is it common, to be focusing on every single chord change or just starting somewhere within the Em chord and ending somewhere in the D chord? while ofcourse staying in the key of C the whole time since I"m making the song in the key of C.
#2
music is music there are no rules for it
just do what you want and what sounds right to you
#3
if its in the key of C why is the D not a D minor?
the chord progression looks like its in E minor to me...not C.
but about the melody, i usually make melodies by ear.
(i play a chord progression and then hum a melody.)
but i would think that it would be best to stay in the chords in the begining go out of a the chords a little bit to build up some tension and then release it on the E minor.
....just a thought
idk lol
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#4
Not even approaching the proper music theory answer (because there are people much more qualified than me to do that), keep in mind it all depends on your ear. Things that sounds off or "wrong" to some people sound good to others. Heck, eastern music (e.g. Japanese) actually includes discord along with the harmony; they see them as two parts of music, intertwined.

For the most part, unless you have a really good ear or know a lot of theory, try to stay generally within (or around) the chords, or get someone with one of those two things to help you out.

Regardless, though, don't make something ridiculously out of tune just because.
#5
Quote by xmacattack18
ok so if I got a chord progression for a verse Em, Am , G, D if I'm writing a melody for it. should I / is it common, to be focusing on every single chord change or just starting somewhere within the Em chord and ending somewhere in the D chord? while ofcourse staying in the key of C the whole time since I"m making the song in the key of C.

Your song isn't in the key of C on account of there being no C chord, it's in E minor...therefore base your melody around the E minor scale and follow the chord changes within the scale.
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#6
Em - E G B
Am - A C E
G - G B D
D - D F# A

try to sustain on the above notes at chord changes. But you know what, you can do anything you like, ANYTHING!!! Its just your ears. Its just that it has to sound good....
#7
Quote by steven seagull
Your song isn't in the key of C on account of there being no C chord, it's in E minor...therefore base your melody around the E minor scale and follow the chord changes within the scale.
I dont hear any resolution to C or E. I do hear a resolution to G though, so I think the song is in G.
Quote by xmacattack18
is it common, to be focusing on every single chord change or just starting somewhere within the Em chord and ending somewhere in the D chord?
It's not really something to worry about, as phrasing is far more important IMO

So if you did write chords before melody, most guys would focus on the chords, as each note sounds different over each chord.
The root and the perfect fifths are the most consonant notes, which means you can sound finished (resolved) on these notes. Next comes chord tones, just as sbikram said, which are the root third and fifth.
Than comes the rest of the notes in a pentatonic scale (the second and sixth over a major chord and the fourth and seventh over a minor chord), these notes sound pretty consonant, but not as consonant as chord tones.
After that comes the rest of the notes in a diatonic scale.

Trust your ear. Sometimes it sounds best to use a dissonant (opposite to consonant) note.