#1
I have learned the 7 patterns of the 3nps and already know how to construct the major, minor and pentatonic scales. What should i do next?
-When you have eliminated all which is impossible,then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

-PRS Tremonti SE with SD SH-1 '59 (Neck) and SD Distortion (Bridge)

-Schecter C-1 Elite

-Line 6 PODXT

-Floorboard
#2
Understand them
Quote by razorback91
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Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#3
Quote by 08L1V10N
Understand them

+1

knowing the scale is only the beginning, learning to use it is the important bit.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#4
What do you mean by understand them?

Tips and more elaboration would be nice.

Thanks
-When you have eliminated all which is impossible,then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

-PRS Tremonti SE with SD SH-1 '59 (Neck) and SD Distortion (Bridge)

-Schecter C-1 Elite

-Line 6 PODXT

-Floorboard
#5
Quote by steven seagull
+1

knowing the scale is only the beginning, learning to use it is the important bit.

yeah i agree!! U need to improvise over them...
#6
by improvising do you mean improvise in one pattern or all?
-When you have eliminated all which is impossible,then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

-PRS Tremonti SE with SD SH-1 '59 (Neck) and SD Distortion (Bridge)

-Schecter C-1 Elite

-Line 6 PODXT

-Floorboard
#7
Don't improvise in any "patterns", or at least don't think of it that way - concentrate on the notes you're using and the sound they make and how they interact with each other and the underlying chords. Obviously things will fall into patterns, but the pattern isn't the important thing - you should never be thinking "where do my fingers go next", it should always be "what sound do I want next".
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
To Seagull:

How should i start practising?
-When you have eliminated all which is impossible,then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

-PRS Tremonti SE with SD SH-1 '59 (Neck) and SD Distortion (Bridge)

-Schecter C-1 Elite

-Line 6 PODXT

-Floorboard
#9
record a chord progression then while listening improvise over it using the scales you know
#10
Quote by 08L1V10N
Understand them



and ....... make music with them.

learn some solos and/or melodies that use them.
shred is gaudy music
#11
Quote by gflip69
by improvising do you mean improvise in one pattern or all?

Improvise using the notes and intervals of the scales. Think harmonically and melodically as opposed to restricting yourself to this pattern or that pattern. If you understand the theory behind the scales, you'll be able to work with the whole neck much more easily.
#12
Quote by :-D
Improvise using the notes and intervals of the scales. Think harmonically and melodically as opposed to restricting yourself to this pattern or that pattern. If you understand the theory behind the scales, you'll be able to work with the whole neck much more easily.


While I do agree with this 100%, it is, at least for me, a whole hell of a lot harder to do than it sounds. I have memorized some of the notes on the neck, but I don't call them by name enough to be able to locate them on a whim. I am still having trouble navigating without the aid of the boxes. I try to think of notes and intervals but I can't seem to think fast enough. It's like I have to stop playing and say "Ok I've got an A note right here, I'll hammer on the C, then slide up to E", get that idea, play it then pause and think where the other notes are. I agree with both Steven Seagull's and D's posts but for me as a beginner (9 months) It is extremely hard to solo in this manner. From what I've learned so far, the only way to get past this is to simply practice and keep learning what notes are where and continue to get more and more familiar with their locations on the fretboard. At least that's the impression I've gotten. But, I do hope that it will become easier for me to improvise without so much dependence on the boxes.
#13
^Absolutely, it makes sense that it's easier because the patterns ARE helpful aids, don't get me wrong. As you continue playing, it'll become easier though; I haven't been playing much longer than you and I have to correct myself sometimes when I'm thinking more about finger placement than note choice.
#15
Quote by rockadoodle
While I do agree with this 100%, it is, at least for me, a whole hell of a lot harder to do than it sounds. I have memorized some of the notes on the neck, but I don't call them by name enough to be able to locate them on a whim. I am still having trouble navigating without the aid of the boxes. I try to think of notes and intervals but I can't seem to think fast enough. It's like I have to stop playing and say "Ok I've got an A note right here, I'll hammer on the C, then slide up to E", get that idea, play it then pause and think where the other notes are. I agree with both Steven Seagull's and D's posts but for me as a beginner (9 months) It is extremely hard to solo in this manner. From what I've learned so far, the only way to get past this is to simply practice and keep learning what notes are where and continue to get more and more familiar with their locations on the fretboard. At least that's the impression I've gotten. But, I do hope that it will become easier for me to improvise without so much dependence on the boxes.



same problem here.
-When you have eliminated all which is impossible,then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth

-PRS Tremonti SE with SD SH-1 '59 (Neck) and SD Distortion (Bridge)

-Schecter C-1 Elite

-Line 6 PODXT

-Floorboard
#16
Quote by gflip69
same problem here.

and that's why you have to work at it...it's not like learning a tab, it won't happen overnight. The more you work at it the stronger you make the association between where you put your fingers and the sound you'll get. It's not so much about patterns, or even scales, it's more about training your ears to recognise the sounds those patterns make.

I don't personally think it's necessary to know every note as you play but you need to know every note on the fretboard to allow you to locate your octaves and key intervals.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#17
Seeing as you said you've learnt your 7 patterns with 3nps', your task is now to paste your major scale across the entire neck (remembering of course that at 12 its all the sameas before). Connect your modes as such and be able to slide in and out of each one with ease.

Once you have that under your fingers and mapped in your head, the next logical move would be to make music. Find a backing track in your relevant key, or make your own, and just practice making sweet melodies. Without turning to a book, figure out why this note sounds good against this chord but not the next, or even why some note sustained over two chords either creates drama or a smile. Why I say don't turn to a book just yet is because its so much nicer knowing that you're correct when you do check and it becomes validated. Or if you're wrong you can scan your progress and realise where it was that it went awry.

Your ear is better than any book but the book helps the brain. It's better to find the weak notes on your own than accept it as gospel and never try it after you have read it.

Please remember that this takes time and you can't rush nature.

Good luck, hope this helps
#18
Quote by gflip69
I have learned the 7 patterns of the 3nps and already know how to construct the major, minor and pentatonic scales. What should i do next?
Just to give you a break from 2 word sentences that explain nothing...

I have a different idea.

Practise your phrasing. As in improvise with them and focus completely on how your phrasing your licks. I'd suggest you try to copy a singers phrasing (which is what alot of guys do actually).

Also, dont get too worried that you cant name every single note that your using when your improvising. I doubt whether many people can. imo, its actually not that important. But knowing what interval your using is (harmonic and melodic), because its the intervals (harmonic and melodic) which have unique sounds, not each individual note.