#1
when soloing off say for instance the g minor scale do you have to hit the G note all the time so it sounds right? also are there any rules to follow to make a good improvised solo?

cuz i learnt the major and minor scales and my solos always sound rubbish
Ibanez RG350DX
Line 6 Spider III
Cubase SX3
Last edited by Conca at Aug 11, 2008,
#3
It usually helps if you don't just hit random notes like Dave Mustaine.
#4
Quote by ray555
One rule of music:

There are no rules

/thread
Quote by blackenedktulu
I Don't Really Know But Capitalising The First Letter In Every Word Is Really Annoying.


As For Me I Like To Play My Own Songs, As I Am Not Into Show Boating.
#5
Quote by Tasman
It usually helps if you don't just hit random notes like Dave Mustaine.

you didnt answer my question about the root note
Ibanez RG350DX
Line 6 Spider III
Cubase SX3
#6
Quote by Tasman
It usually helps if you don't just hit random notes like Dave Mustaine.

unless you are mustain in which case random notes become amazing solos
Quote by haha
every time I see your username I press F8 out of curiosity then I have to give myself a big ol' facepalm


Quote by ouch
What the hell? F8 doesn't do anything interesting This toy is lame


Quote by TheReverend724
I can have a beer later, I need to level Charmeleon NOW!
#7
I don't believe there are any rules, which is why I haven't bothered with a single ounce of theory. Music is meant to be heard, which is why I only concentrate on what sounds good.
ohai little sig.
#8
Quote by Demonikk
I don't believe there are any rules, which is why I haven't bothered with a single ounce of theory. Music is meant to be heard, which is why I only concentrate on what sounds good.

Grow up please...theory exists to give us a heads up as to what sounds good.

TS - There are rules, and if you follow them you're pretty much guaranteed to sound good. However, if you know them well enough then you can break them effectively and still sound good.

But you need to know the rules first.

As far as improvising goes you can be taught scales all you want but you can't be taught creativity. Be realistic, you're not going to be able to improvise crap at the moment because you've only just started trying. Could you recite soliloquies from Hamlet when you started talkng? No, you said crap like "goo goo gaga" and that's where you are at the moment musically, right at the start. The more you work with creating melodies from scales and the more you practice then the better you'll get but it'll all take time.

For the time being though try not to focus too much on the guitar. Instead concentrate on thinking musically, come up with ideas in your head, learn to sing them to get used to the way they sound and then work on transferring them to the guitar. They can be anything...riffs, little licks or full blown solos, but get some ideas in your head first before you pick up the guitar.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
You can land on any note except for the fourth of a major or dominant chord, but the best are the third, seventh, fifth, or root of a chord (in that order).
Tiger style.
#10
Try using the pentatonic scale. That way it is harder to hit wrong notes. If the key is G, use the Em pentatonic. Its all about relative minor/majors.
#11
There really ain't no big rules but if you can use all the notes of the scale you want in any order you want. it also depends on what chords are you using behind ur soloing to see what do you sound like
鋼の錬金術師
#14
Hit The root note or third or fifth on the "on-beats" and on the beginning of phrases. You can hit the notes in between them on the off beats. Obviously you can mess around with that-if it sounds good do it-but that's just a general rule. Also, it's good to have a chord progression in mind, even just a simple I-I-IV-V.

So, if you were in everyone's favorite key of a-minor you'd try to emphasize a, c, and e for the first two measures/phrases, d, f, and a for the third, and e, g# and b for the fourth. It could also be just g depending on whether or not you're playing a major or a minor E chord at the end.
If you're completely lost you need to learn more about chords, just learning the scales isn't enough.
And you need theory, even people who say they don't use it are using it, they're just either playing a musical game of pin the tail on the donkey or they've figured it out on their own, and simply don't know the names for it.
#16
Quote by GuitarHero0715
I dont know any theory and I can improvise pretty well, of course I cant go on doing a 9 minute solo full of amazingness, but at least I have something to play to fill in silence for a few seconds


How do you do that?

Quote by megadethdefying
its true, it sounds best if you return to the root quite often (g in your case)


More accurately it should be the root note of the current chord in the progression.
#17
Quote by megadethdefying
its true, it sounds best if you return to the root quite often (g in your case)


I wouldn't say best. Thats a matter of opinion.

But, yes, the root of the chord you are playing over is always going to have the least tension.
#18
I find sliding to the root to be the single most versatile soloing technique... Unfortunately that means almost all my solos start with that... o well
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#19
I'd just want to add something about root notes --

The root is important but not THAT important as far as your improvised soloing goes.
In an ensemble situation, it's the bass that's going to be emphasising root notes.
For the guitar player it's not actually all that important.

There's 2 notes that define a chord's quality: the 3rd and 7th. When soloing,
the most important note you can hit is the 3rd of the current chord , followed by the
7th, if you want your solo to have "melodic control".
#20
Just find some licks of your favorite artists, lengthin them and personalize them to make them sound new and different. just make sure you stay within the boundry of your scale and it should sound all right
#22
^ that is if you don't want to change the chord.
if you hit a 7th of, say, a minor chord, it becomes a minor7 chord
if you hit a 9 it becomes minoradd9, etc etc.
that doesn't really apply to passing notes
#23
Quote by edg
I'd just want to add something about root notes --

The root is important but not THAT important as far as your improvised soloing goes.
In an ensemble situation, it's the bass that's going to be emphasising root notes.
For the guitar player it's not actually all that important.

There's 2 notes that define a chord's quality: the 3rd and 7th. When soloing,
the most important note you can hit is the 3rd of the current chord , followed by the
7th, if you want your solo to have "melodic control".

its not even my thread and i learned something, thank you
Quote by haha
every time I see your username I press F8 out of curiosity then I have to give myself a big ol' facepalm


Quote by ouch
What the hell? F8 doesn't do anything interesting This toy is lame


Quote by TheReverend724
I can have a beer later, I need to level Charmeleon NOW!
#24
Quote by F8iscruel
its not even my thread and i learned something, thank you



LOL, It's just that people seem so root-centric ... the root and 5th of chord tones
are pretty neutral. You can create some really nice strong movements with
3rds and 7ths AND it really defines the harmony.

For example in a I7-iV7-V7 blues progression C7-F7-G7

Over the C7 play heavily on the E (3rd), just before transitioning -> F7 hit Bb (b7th).
On the F7 hit an A (3rd). Before going back -> C7 hit Eb (b7th).
Then E(3rd) again on the C7.

Over the G7, play a B. Prior to -> C7, play an F (b7). Then back to E over C7.

The 7th is a good transition OUT note, the 3rd a good transition IN. When the 7th
of one chord transitions to the 3rd of another by a 1/2 step, it's a VERY strong
movement.

That's a bit of detail about "melodic control".
#25
Quote by kevinm4435
You can land on any note except for the fourth of a major or dominant chord, but the best are the third, seventh, fifth, or root of a chord (in that order).

Lies. You CAN land on the fourth, it just has a strong tendency to move to the third afterwards. Some of my better lines involved suspensions and elaborations of that very resolution or sequences involving a 4-3 movement. Jazz is another story though, using the natural 4 in jazz is uncommon except as a passing tone.
Emphasize the root, third, and seventh of the current chord (fifth is generally natural and thus a given, so you don't have to play it as much), but you don't have to play them constantly. The non-chord tones are what give your lines melodic interest when used tastefully. Also, I would disregard the suggestion for pentatonics except as a very basic starting point, as pentatonics have been done to death and thus your solo will sound rather dull imo.
Last edited by Nightfyre at Aug 12, 2008,
#27
When i first started i found the best way to create a cool solo was to just find a scale (i liked the exotic ones e.g. Major Phrygian) then i would just pick a key i want the solo in then use the notes from the scale and just create cool sounding patterns and it always sounds good cause your sticking in the scale but realy you should learn about intervals and scales if you want to realy master improv
*PROFILE NOT IN USE*
#29
Quote by due 07
Try using the pentatonic scale. That way it is harder to hit wrong notes. If the key is G, use the Em pentatonic. Its all about relative minor/majors.

thats wrong! if i use the em fair enough its the relative minor but that doesnt make it the g major. the shapes are the same but the root note changes.
Ibanez RG350DX
Line 6 Spider III
Cubase SX3
#30
Quote by kevinm4435
You can land on any note except for the fourth of a major or dominant chord, but the best are the third, seventh, fifth, or root of a chord (in that order).


So what happens if i land on fourth of a major chord?

Does Music Theory Department shows up and take me to the jail?
Quote by Johnljones7443
my neew year reslosutions are not too drikn as much lol.

happy new yeeae guyas.
#31
If your a beginner, stick to the scale.

Hear it in your head, then play it

If it sounds good, keep playing it.

EDIT

And if you land on the fourth the world wont explode.

The problem with it is just in jazz.

When your playing a jazz progression (especially on bass), first few chords go

I IV I I IV IV etc etc

The problem is that the fourth note of the I chord is the first note of the IV chord. And it sounds bad when you play the root note of the next chord the measure before it.
Last edited by zeppelinfreak51 at Aug 16, 2008,