#1
Hey guys. I know you have probably seen threads like this in bass forum. But reading through most of them, I couldn't find the awnsers I was looking for. Here is the lowdown. I have some time on my hands and I get board alot and like to screw with things. I have this s h i t factory chinese p bass, and it's one of those no name basses by the way, made by 5 year old sweatshop workers probably near the chinese/north Vietnames border. Anyway I decided to operate on the bastard and make it into a fretless since i don't care what happens to it. Now beside ripping the frets out, what else should be involved when converting a bass neck for frettless? What should be used to fill in the fret cavities? Should I treat the finger board with schalk? I will be useing roundwound strings on it to ( i know thats a no no) so i want to make it last.

Here is what i got so far.

Pocket knife
200 grit sand paper
Elmers Glue
Lemon Oil
Wood filler

Anything else i should add to the list?

Thanks.
#3
Just wanted to say. There's no real need to use the language you're using.

I'm pretty sure FbSa or JazzRockFeel had a thread on the process of defretting.
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#4
"But reading through most of them, I couldn't find the awnsers I was looking for"

Just for reference.

If you're looking to make it last, you should probably invest in a polyurethane or epoxy of some sorts. This protects the fretboard from stringwear (especially with roundwounds).

From what I've read, poly is much easier to use than epoxy, however to each his own. We all know Jaco used marine epoxy?
Quote by FbSa
Back in the 70's I decided to take all the frets off Jaco's Bass thinking he would play worse. Man did that backfire.

[quote="'[x"]Huffy[x]']FUCK YES.

GSAWS, I LOVE YOU.
#5
Quote by Gsaws
"But reading through most of them, I couldn't find the awnsers I was looking for"

Just for reference.

If you're looking to make it last, you should probably invest in a polyurethane or epoxy of some sorts. This protects the fretboard from stringwear (especially with roundwounds).

From what I've read, poly is much easier to use than epoxy, however to each his own. We all know Jaco used marine epoxy?



Finally a usefull reply on this thread....

I was thinking of some kind of wood sealer like for outdoor decks, but i guess Polyurethane would be better since it's thicker? Would the strings eat it up/leave marks?
#6
It's true that there are a lot of threads about this, and there are even general FAQ's about the process on the web, but I figure you're looking for a more one on one thing?

From what I've read, polyurethane is more appropriate for a situation like a bass neck. I don't know about wood sealer but I know that epoxy is more suited to impact, as opposed to general wear like polyurethane. I imagine that the strings would still leave wear, but on the poly instead of the wood? I personally haven't done it but thats my guess.

Plus, I know most poly products are easier to apply.

Just do a quick google search, you'll find a ton of guides and reccomendations with pictures and walkthroughs. I don't mean to be rude but if you'll just slowly look at my signature...
Quote by FbSa
Back in the 70's I decided to take all the frets off Jaco's Bass thinking he would play worse. Man did that backfire.

[quote="'[x"]Huffy[x]']FUCK YES.

GSAWS, I LOVE YOU.
Last edited by Gsaws at Aug 12, 2008,
#7
Since its a cheap one, and you want it to last, do this:

use masking tape on the neck, where you DONT want wood filler to be. Use a few layers. Fill the fret trenches slowly and carefully with little "worms" made out of FastSteel steel&epoxy from the auto parts store. Or you can use Wood Filler epoxy that comes in the little plastic tubes (this worked for me on my favorite one) It will be very important to keep wetting your fingers with a rag or little bowl of warm water. Make sure you fill them completely without getting it all over the fretboard. (you are going to sand it and its going to be harder than the wood).

LET THE STUFF CURE COMPLETELY. Take off the masking tape, and now use a bastard mill file to do the work. File at an angle NOT perpendicular to the neck, and do NOT file the neck surface flat! Try to maintain or improve the original radius of the neck. You can also use sand paper (nothing rougher than 200). steel yardstick to check your work. You will have to sand with fine grit to finish. and possibly use some wood filler if there are chips or dents.

You will likely have to filed the nut string notches down or cut a new nut to compensate for the lower surface of the neck. If you don't you will never intonate the guitar. If you don't have an adustable bridge, don't even try this unless you want to fit one on the bass. Use Flatwound strings!
Last edited by stratbassplayer at Feb 4, 2009,