#1
Now I'm debating running my current computer on Ubuntu and testing it out for a while before i get a new one to decide weather or not i might have to commit the ultimate sin and switch to mac. I can't stand the little tweaks in vista so that's no option.

I had a few questions about it though.

First how is its foreign language support (Not sure if i worded that right but displaying and inputting characters not in the English language)? I study Japanese for school and need to be able to view and write documents in Japanese as well as English and switch between them easily.

Also in general how does it compare to XP?
*Does it require more or less memory?
*Does it run smoother or not?

And most of all should I switch?
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an unsaturated fattylolcid.
#2
It is in almost all the languages, and supports almost all of them.
It requires less memory than XP
It runs smoother than XP
It's nicer than XP

BUT, you will have to relearn almost everything, and switch to open source, which is why I'm sticking with XP.
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#5
it certainly runs smoother and handles energy better.

I installed it in english, and then tried to change it to spanish (I understand computers better in english, but I speak spanish), and it won't do accents right no matter what I do, so I don't know about your japanese input, but japanese is available to use, so you can at least have the menus and things in japanese.

I would definitely make the switch. Ubuntu is great. If you're ever stuck on anything, go to ubuntuforums.com
They're great, friendly, helpful people

EDIT: beaten to it, but really, you don't have to learn everything over again. it's pretty much common sense. and open source > all
#6
1) The language packs are complete if you choose to install them. They're quite solid it would appear.
2) It runs more smoothly and consumes less memory under typical usage than XP. Certain applications may be bigger memory hogs than their Windows counterparts, but the OS itself is much more efficient.

The question of should you switch depends on a few things. Are there any Windows only applications you absolutely have to have? If so, you can try and see if they'll run in WINE, but it's not a great chance. Often you can find a replacement app if you're not being forced to use something due to a work environment or something similar. If those aren't an option, switching isn't a great call unless you want to run a dual boot environment or in a virtual machine.

Also, do you feel comfortable making a change to an environment that is fairly different? I'd assume so since you're considering a Mac.

I'm posting this from an Ubuntu install and I've been using Linux on and off for years, but finally made the switch for my primary OS during winter. I'm quite satisfied, and have few complaints, far less than with Windows anyhow. It's easy to use, and looks pretty good. If you want rid of Windows but can't afford a Mac, Linux is your OS, and Ubuntu is your distro.

Hope this helps.
-limefan913

Quote by Chad48309
Quote by The_lizard_king
Originally Posted by The_lizard_king
It really does relieve stress. I was pissed off for a week because I didn't jerk off, so if you quit it you will go mad.
I don't think that's the correct use of the phrase "going mad."
#7
Quote by clickypens
it certainly runs smoother and handles energy better.

I installed it in english, and then tried to change it to spanish (I understand computers better in english, but I speak spanish), and it won't do accents right no matter what I do, so I don't know about your japanese input, but japanese is available to use, so you can at least have the menus and things in japanese.

I would definitely make the switch. Ubuntu is great. If you're ever stuck on anything, go to ubuntuforums.com
They're great, friendly, helpful people

EDIT: beaten to it, but really, you don't have to learn everything over again. it's pretty much common sense. and open source > all

Terminal and sudo =/= common sense.
Wine =/= common sense.
Photoshop > GIMP
3ds MAX > Blender
Microsoft Office > Open Office (as much as I hate to admit it).

Obviously, assuming that you can get them for "free". If you have to pay for them, opensource and linux all the way.
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#8
Quote by limefan913
Also, do you feel comfortable making a change to an environment that is fairly different? I'd assume so since you're considering a Mac.


I don't mind a major change i just dislike tiny little tweaks that leave me confused in vista, like looking for "My Computer" when they changed it to "Computer". Or getting rid of the drop down "File", "Edit" and "View" tabs in office.
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an unsaturated fattylolcid.
#9
Quote by urik
Terminal and sudo =/= common sense.
Wine =/= common sense.
Photoshop > GIMP
3ds MAX > Blender
Microsoft Office > Open Office (as much as I hate to admit it).

Obviously, assuming that you can get them for "free". If you have to pay for them, opensource and linux all the way.



I dunno. Personally, I found it easy. there's always people talking about how difficult it is, but really all you have to do is follow instructions.

I've never used those programs except the office ones, and really, I don't much like open office, either. It seems really rather vacant and basic to me. So I'll give ya that one. But are you sure you can't get photoshop on linux (I don't even know what 3ds MAX is)?
#10
Clickypens, look up "gimp" on youtube. Watch a few videos and see what you think.
#11
Quote by clickypens
I dunno. Personally, I found it easy. there's always people talking about how difficult it is, but really all you have to do is follow instructions.

I've never used those programs except the office ones, and really, I don't much like open office, either. It seems really rather vacant and basic to me. So I'll give ya that one. But are you sure you can't get photoshop on linux (I don't even know what 3ds MAX is)?

You can get it on linux using wine, (I heard that CS2 works fine, and CS3 still has some issues). But isn't the installation very complicated? What's the point if in windows you can make some clicks and install it?
3Ds Max is a software to create 3D models (and other 3D stuff such as texturing and animation), and Blender is a free 3D software that works in linux.
What would be a good alternative to Office?
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