#1
The amp i am lookin at come in a head version (obviously with your choice of any cabinet (thats not what i am asking here)) or a combo, i was thinking about buying the head but i dont think its really neccessary, so does it give a better sound at all? i mean if i used to same speakers that came in the combo version?
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#2
well a head is just a Pre amp and a Power amp, the only differnce between a Head/Cab and a Combo is that the combo has the speaker built in.
But the advantage of a Head/cab can be more advantages of cabs you can use.
...
#3
heads typically have a lot more head room too
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#4
I think a seperate closed cab is generaly better. The wood makes a lot more difference that people think.
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#5
depends on a couple things, and it's really only preference. Sometimes the head is more wattage, which can sound punchier and tighter with the bigger output transformers. There is also the question of closed back versus open back designs, where most combos are open back due to heat concerns. A closed back will give you a tighter bass response.

The real advantage of a head is the ability to change cabs on the fly. Different cabs and speakers can have a dramatic affect on the sound.
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#6
Quote by Erock503
depends on a couple things, and it's really only preference. Sometimes the head is more wattage, which can sound punchier and tighter with the bigger output transformers. There is also the question of closed back versus open back designs, where most combos are open back due to heat concerns. A closed back will give you a tighter bass response.

The real advantage of a head is the ability to change cabs on the fly. Different cabs and speakers can have a dramatic affect on the sound.



troof
#7
Consider portability in your debate. Combos are easier to travel around with than a head/cab rig. If you happen to have an '81 Honda, the combo might be the way to go.
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#8
lol^ no, i dont =P, i dont want to compromise quality for portablility, i dont want to buy nother amp for a long time lol/.

does the wood thickness of a cab make a noticable difference?

for example, something like the Framus CS212 is a 17mm thick wood, with an adjustable back (as in you can make it a closed, 3/4,1/2 or open back and keep changing it)

and the Orange PPc212 which is a thicker wood and a closed back from memory, apart from bass response does thicker wood = better tone?
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Vox AC50CPH
Framus FR 212 CB
Ibanez AF105
Ibanez RGT32FMSP
Line 6 DL4

If you have a camera or photography related question, i can help.

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Last edited by Themitch at Aug 12, 2008,
#9
Quote by musicology
Consider portability in your debate. Combos are easier to travel around with than a head/cab rig. If you happen to have an '81 Honda, the combo might be the way to go.



Actually, I'd rather lug around a head and a 2x12 or 2 2x12s. If you have casters on the 4x12, then its easy to get around, with maybe a little help on staircases, but I don't see why that's a problem
#10
Quote by ICANSEEYOU7687
heads typically have a lot more head room too


Was this a pun?

If not, this isn't true at all. A combo is generally just the chassis (all the components and circuitry) lifted out of the head cabinet, put into a bigger box with a speaker or speakers. It has nothing to do with headroom.
#11
Quote by Themitch
lol^ no, i dont =P, i dont want to compromise quality for portablility, i dont want to buy nother amp for a long time lol/.

does the wood thickness of a cab make a noticable difference?

for example, something like the Framus CS212 is a 17mm thick wood, with an adjustable back (as in you can make it a closed, 3/4,1/2 or open back and keep changing it)

and the Orange PPc212 which is a thicker wood and a closed back from memory, apart from bass response does thicker wood = better tone?

it's more dependent on the type of wood. Plys can be very thick, while consisting of mostly glues and fillers, while solid wood can be very resonant, but much thinner. They do make excellent plys for cabs however, baltic birch is a very popular one, and it's actual chips of birch, rather than particle board filler. It's not as resonant as hardwood, but sometimes you want the cab to be less resonant. The thickness of the ply can have an affect however, generally the thicker plys, assuming the same kind of voidless baltic birch, will be higher quality and produce a better sound. That can be marginal however.
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#12
I like heads alot more than combos usually, i think its the added bass you get from more than one speaker.
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#13
Quote by guitarbite.fire
I like heads alot more than combos usually, i think its the added bass you get from more than one speaker.

...but a combo can also have more than one speaker.
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#14
Quote by Erock503
depends on a couple things, and it's really only preference. Sometimes the head is more wattage, which can sound punchier and tighter with the bigger output transformers. There is also the question of closed back versus open back designs, where most combos are open back due to heat concerns. A closed back will give you a tighter bass response.

The real advantage of a head is the ability to change cabs on the fly. Different cabs and speakers can have a dramatic affect on the sound.

+1

Best post in the thread; Erock503 knows what he's talking about.
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#16
I'd much rather lug around a 40ish pound head and 65ish 4x12 than a big hulking combo that weighs close to 100.