#1
hi, well im ready to make a try making a song, most specific, a heavy metal song with trash things and i will like to using theory and no random notes.

BUT!

i have many question about. (first of all i have already read that stupid theory thread so dont make a link to that plz)

1.- i have read about the "chord progressions" like I-IV-V and it sound good, i really dont know what the hell is that, i know the roman number are intervals and i perfectly understand it but how i will know about that "progression" there are a formula o it just music knowledge? if someone can pull my doubt out, i will thank u in no time.

2.- where i can find how i can know about what scales fits well with what chords, i mean, ex. take the A harmonic minor scale, what can i play in the background?

3.- about the root notes, i heard that the root note is important but not so important cuz it sound well his 3 and 5 interval of the root note can someone explain this? also, in a scale ex. A harmonic minor, i guess his root note is A but i also guess in that scale they have to be more notes that "sounds well" and some notes that dont sound that well, how can i figured that or where i can learn it?

4.- about progressions, is there any "default" progression in metal music? like a power chords progressions? or any intervals progressions?

5.- i heard alot about "keeping in key" like all this song is in the key of G, but i dont understand that, what is exactly that key? an scale? and what notes is inside of the key of G?

6.- when playing a scale is there any posibility to incorporate power chords?

i will be grateful, thx in advance!!
#2
Quote by axl611


(first of all i have already read that stupid theory thread so dont make a link to that plz)


I don't believe you, because of this...

Quote by axl611


i have read about the "chord progressions"...i really dont know what the hell is that

where i can find how i can know about what scales fits well with what chords, i mean, ex. take the A harmonic minor scale, what can i play in the background?

about the root notes, i heard that the root note is important but not so important cuz it sound well his 3 and 5 interval of the root note can someone explain this?

i heard alot about "keeping in key" like all this song is in the key of G, but i dont understand that, what is exactly that key? an scale? and what notes is inside of the key of G?



Those are basically covered in the lessons
#3
ok... if i say that i have read the thread is cuz im not understanding, that guide is not for stupid people like me so thats why i posted that questions, ok? you arent helping me, only saying trash things.. so if u can help me, do it if not let other answer please..
btw i have understood the 2º question, it isnt necessary to answer.
#4
In a major scale there are 7 notes. Take G for example; G, A, B, C, D, E, F# (then back to G again). Each of these notes denotes a chord that will fi in with the key; G Major, A minor, B minor, C Major, D Major, E minor, F# Diminished, and then back to G major.

I can't really elaborte on that without going into detail that would be subjective to you, such as a chord progression, but playing a G major scale (improvising or soloing with that scale) over a chord progression with some of those chords in would sound 'in a key'.

But that's some basic theory so you should probably read those lessons some more.

EDIT: Sorry to anyone who finds fault in what I've said, it's been a while since I've actually done some theory.
#5
You see that the interval between A and C is only 1 1/2 so that's why it is minor
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#6
Quote by axl611
1.- i have read about the "chord progressions" like I-IV-V and it sound good, i really dont know what the hell is that, i know the roman number are intervals and i perfectly understand it but how i will know about that "progression" there are a formula o it just music knowledge? if someone can pull my doubt out, i will thank u in no time.
Goddamnit, I hate responding to contradictions. Do you understand it or not? If you dont, dont say you understand it perfectly. And I cant find a question in there. I see a question mark, but no question.
Quote by axl611
2.- where i can find how i can know about what scales fits well with what chords, i mean, ex. take the A harmonic minor scale, what can i play in the background?
Learn to harmonize chords from scales. Read this: http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

Quote by axl611
3.- about the root notes, i heard that the root note is important but not so important cuz it sound well his 3 and 5 interval of the root note can someone explain this? also, in a scale ex. A harmonic minor, i guess his root note is A but i also guess in that scale they have to be more notes that "sounds well" and some notes that dont sound that well, how can i figured that or where i can learn it?
First of, in english, german and most other nordic languages, non-living things cannot be "hims" or "hers." So I'm guessing your italian or french or some other latin based language?
Generally chord tones. So whatever notes the chords are made up of, these notes will sound the best.

Quote by axl611
4.- about progressions, is there any "default" progression in metal music? like a power chords progressions? or any intervals progressions?
No. There is no default progression to metal.
(btw, this next paragraph isnt for beginners in theory)
Technically there is no such thing as a powerchord progression. Firstly because powerchords arent chords, they are diads. Secondly because powerchords dont resolve. The only way to resolve using powerchords is either by semitonal movement (say G#5 to A5) or by using another instrument to play the thirds of each chord.

Quote by axl611
5.- i heard alot about "keeping in key" like all this song is in the key of G, but i dont understand that, what is exactly that key? an scale? and what notes is inside of the key of G?
Basically, most songs will use the same 7 notes. These 7 notes as a group is called a scale, it is usually minor or major. The key is the scale (minor or major) that is used. Staying in key means to only use those 7 notes.


Okay. I'm REALLY sorry if this comes out too harsh, but the best advice I can give you is to learn proper english. Sadly, most of the internet is in english, so most articles on theory and most of our posts would be in english. I believe the reason you did not understand the sticky isnt because the sticky is stupid, but because you do not have a firm grasp of english. Yes, I know english might be a second language for you, but it is an essential language for you to know.
Sorry.

Inb4 some idiot makes a crack at all my grammatical errors (aw michael, why dont you learn english yourself, hahahaha)
#7
Quote by axl611
1.- i have read about the "chord progressions" like I-IV-V and it sound good, i really dont know what the hell is that, i know the roman number are intervals and i perfectly understand it but how i will know about that "progression" there are a formula o it just music knowledge? if someone can pull my doubt out, i will thank u in no time.
2.- where i can find how i can know about what scales fits well with what chords, i mean, ex. take the A harmonic minor scale, what can i play in the background?

Take the major scale. There are seven notes and each note will be made into a number.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 The distance between note 1 and note 2 is one Whole step (two frets) the distance between note 2 and note 3 is also one Whole step. From 3 to 4 is a half step (one fret). From 4 to 5 is a whole step, 5 to 6 is a whole step, 6 to 7 is a whole step and from 7 to 8 is a half step. 8 is the same as one but an octave higher.

Now to create a triad starting on note 1 we add to the note a third above, in this case the 3 note. We then add another note a third above that one. A third above the 3 is 5.
So our first chord is made up of notes 1 3 5

The next triad begins on note 2. We then add a note a third above the 2 which is note 4. Then we add a note a third above the 4 which is the 6.
So our second triad is made up of notes 2 4 6.

Now take a minute to notice something. The distance between notes 1 and 3 is two whole steps (four frets if played on one string) The total distance between note 1 and note 5 is three whole steps plus a half step (7 frets). It is called a perfect 5th interval. Because the intervals in this chord are a major third and a perfect fifth this chord is a major chord.

Now look at the second triad. The first note is 2 the second note is 4. The distance between these notes is one whole step plus a half step (3 frets) which is a minor third. The distance between notes 2 and 6 is a perfect fifth (seven frets). Because the intervals in this chord are a minor third and a perfect fifth this is a minor chord.

Because the step pattern between the notes of the major scale are always the same (Whole step - Whole step - Half step - Whole step - Whole step - Whole step - Half step) the diatonic triad built on note 1 of the major scale is always a major chord no matter what key you are using. Similarly the triad starting on note 2 is always a minor chord no matter what key you are playing in.

This applies to the rest of the chords in the major scale.
starting on note 3 = 3 5 7 - this is a minor chord
starting on note 4 = 4 6 1 - this is a major chord
starting on note 5 = 5 7 2 - this is a major chord
starting on note 6 = 6 1 3 - this is a minor chord
starting on note 7 = 7 2 4 - this is a little different it is a minor third and a diminished fifth which makes it a diminished triad.

Now if we take our chords and write them out as roman numerals where major triads are spelled in upper case, minor are spelled in lower case, and the diminished either has (dim) after it or a little circle like this º.
So diatonic chords written as Roman Numerals are (diatonic meaning using only the notes from the scale)
I ii iii IV V vi viiº

So if you want to know what chords will fit a key you just have to figure out what key and plug in the letters.
For example in the key of C major we get the following:
I = C; ii = Dm; iii = Em; IV = F; V = G; vi = Am; viiº = Bº

So a I IV V progression would be all major chords. In the key of C it would be C - F - G
I ii IV V would be C Dm F G in the key of C. etc etc
Quote by axl611
5.- i heard alot about "keeping in key" like all this song is in the key of G, but i dont understand that, what is exactly that key? an scale? and what notes is inside of the key of G?
The key of G is G A B C D E F# (notice the step pattern) these are the notes of the G major scale. To play chord within this key you would use the chords we discussed earlier I ii iii IV V vi viiº this would be any of the following chords G Am Bm C D Em F#º

Over a progression using these chords where the G is established as the home chord you would play the G major scale. This would keep you in the key of G.

Quote by axl611
6.- when playing a scale is there any posibility to incorporate power chords?
Yes you can play powerchords in a scale.
Si
#8
haha, thanks to all, u clarified all my questions.
and thanks to demonofthenight for the gramar lesson.
this are the people whe need in UG =D
#9
He made me think of a question. Consider it hijacked. If I want to play in the lets say A harmonic minor, would I use the same chords that work for A major? or do different scales have differenct chords?
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!