#1
I've been playing for around 2 years.Iv'e learned quite a handful of scales from Major and minor Pentantonic,Major and Minor Scales,Blues Scale,Egyptian Scale.But I don't get how you can start soloing and making your own melody with the scales?Besides have to use the same key with the chord porgressions.Since i've tried writting/improvising before with some chord progressions and they sounded bad.Any advice?
~Vince~
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#2
If you play only the notes, it always will sound like crap. You have to to vibrato, bendings, slides and stuff like that. Try, and you will see I'm right ^^
#3
Weeey, I haven't had a chance to write an essay on ths in a while!

OK, to improvise over chords, you need two things; a solid knowledge of scales and the ability to find out what key a piece is in (or knowledge of what key it's in).

So say you have a progression in A minor. The most logical scale to use is, quite obviously, the A minor scale. Now that you know that, you can apply some rules and use other scales that are directly related to the A minor scale.

A minor's relations:

A minor scale ALWAYS has a relative major . This is a scale that shares the same notes as the minor, played in a different order with a different root note to make it sound major. It's root note is ALWAYS 3 semitones (3 frets) up from the minor's root note. So A minor's relative major would be:

A+ 1 Semitone = Bb
Bb +1 Semitone = B
B +1 Semitone = C

C major.

So now you can use A minor and C major over your progression!

As you probably know, in most modern rock the main type of scales used is pentatonic. You can look at it as a simplified version of the Minor and Major scales. If you can use a major or minor scale in a progression, you can definitley use its pentatonic counterpart, so because you can use A minor and C major, you can also use A minor Pentatonic and C major Pentatonic. That's 4 possible scales you have to use now.

When you say you have learned the pentatonic scale I assume you have learned it in ROOT POSITION. See if you can also learn it's positions (or boxes) because this allows you to have a greater range over the fretboard. If you simply played notes from A minor pentatonic in root position (I.e starting on the 5th or 17th fret) then it would get boring pretty quickly, no?

Here's a Link for the other positions of the pentatonic scale.

So now you have the knowledge to play the notes that sound "in tune" with your progression. Now you need to play them stylishly and interestingly. Unfortunatley there are only two real ways to do this when you are starting out, and that's to listen to lots of solos to understand what you think sounds good and try and compose stuff that is similar, or directly steal from other guitarists. That is, you can hear a cool pat of a solo, work out what key it is in and then TRANSPOSE it to your key. For example:

|-s15--14------15--14--17--|--15-----14----15--14-s12------15--14--|
|----------12--------------|---------------------------12----------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|


This is part of the solo fro Nothing Else Matters by Metallica. If you want to transpose it you first have to know what key it's in. News just in: It's in E minor. So if you wanted that for the solo over your A minor progression then you have to work out how many semitones seperate E from A. So:

E-F-F#-G-G#-A

A is 5 semitones up from E. So now all you have to do is move the whole part 5 semitones (which are frets, handy) up and it will be in the key of your song. This is how it looks:


|-s20--19------20--19--23--|--20-----19----20--19-s17------20--19--|
|----------17--------------|---------------------------17----------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|---------------------------------------|


And everything's up 5 frets.

Other than that, I can't help you. Keep going at it and eventually you'll be able to make up solos on the spot with ease.

...
Last edited by bartdevil_metal at Aug 12, 2008,
#4
thanks so much for everything I'm happy to start now or atleast try! x)
~Vince~
Fender MIM Telecaster ('06) [Modded]
PRS S2 Custom 24 ('13) [Modded]
Squier Affinity Fat Strat [Modded]
Yamaha F310

Mesa/Boogie Lonestar 1x12 Combo
Mesa/Boogie Mark V:25

SD Vapor Trail
Xotic SL Drive
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#5
Quote by bartdevil_metal

A minor's relations:

A minor scale ALWAYS has a relative major . This is a scale that shares the same notes as the minor, played in a different order with a different root note to make it sound major. It's root note is ALWAYS 3 semitones (3 frets) up from the minor's root note. So A minor's relative major would be:

A+ 1 Semitone = Bb
Bb +1 Semitone = B
B +1 Semitone = C

C major.

So now you can use A minor and C major over your progression!



Well, your description of relative minor/major is right, but the conclusion you
draw from it is wrong.

If your progression is in A minor and play a C major scale over it, you're still just
playing A minor. The chords determine the tonal center so no matter what mode
of A minor/C major you're playing, it still ends up sounding like A minor over an
A minor progression.

Anyway, to the TS: The first thing you should do for starters is forget about the
exotic scales. You don't need them. Improvisation is mostly about understanding the
major scale. If you've tried it and it doesn't sound good, it's nearly certain you
just don't understand how the notes work. That takes time. I'd suggest learning
some solos and then trying to figure out how the bits of the solo work in relation
to the key (or major or minor scale).

I'd highly suggest starting solo practice over blues -- it's at the roots of rock and
jazz. Understanding blues will help you play over anything else.

The first thing to understand about blues and quite a bit of rock, is that the
pentatonic MINOR scale is the most general choice of scale over either a MAJOR OR
MINOR progression. The pentatonic minor is the easiest way to get started without
knowing much about theory. I could explain a bit why the pent minor is used over
major chords, but that would get too lengthy and you don't really need to know yet.

So, for example take a 12 bar blues in A major -- fool around with A minor pent
over it.
#6
Quote by edg
Well, your description of relative minor/major is right, but the conclusion you
draw from it is wrong.

If your progression is in A minor and play a C major scale over it, you're still just
playing A minor. The chords determine the tonal center so no matter what mode
of A minor/C major you're playing, it still ends up sounding like A minor over an
A minor progression.


Well yeah, I just didn't want to confuse the TS. The major scale can be viewed as another position of its relative minor, or vice versa, it depends on the harmony that is used with it to give the feeling of "major" or "minor".
...
#7
thanks again I'll start off with blues and , listening to some solos thanks alot
~Vince~
Fender MIM Telecaster ('06) [Modded]
PRS S2 Custom 24 ('13) [Modded]
Squier Affinity Fat Strat [Modded]
Yamaha F310

Mesa/Boogie Lonestar 1x12 Combo
Mesa/Boogie Mark V:25

SD Vapor Trail
Xotic SL Drive
Xotic BB Preamp
Boss BD-2
Boss DS-1 [MonteAllums]
MXR 10-Band EQ