#1
Ok guys.

I am basically trying to build an interesting solo over a

G-C-G-C-G-C... G-D-G-D-G

chord progression.

Actually, the only thing I am using is the G-Major (and pentatonic/blues) over it, but it seems too sweet and limited.

In your experience, which mode for each chord will give a better and more interesting melody?

Thanks,

Zack
#2
That progression seems to be in C major, so use C major. It's not modal at all.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Stash Jam
^thats in G major, but yeah it's not a modal progression so G major or G blues is the way to go there


A progression consisting only of C major and G major chords would seem to me to be in C major.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
A progression consisting only of C major and G major chords would seem to me to be in C major.


Indeed, but the op said... " I am basically trying to build an interesting solo over a

G-C-G-C-G-C... G-D-G-D-G

chord progression.

"
#7
So, when you say that it is not a modal progression, you mean that there is no particular mode implied by the progression?
#8
Quote by thezack
So, when you say that it is not a modal progression, you mean that there is no particular mode implied by the progression?


Sort of. Modes are harmonically unstable and are used over progressions that are specifically designed for them. They are not something you just pull out when you want to spice up a solo.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
A progression consisting only of C major and G major chords would seem to me to be in C major.


Then one of us needs to get our eyes checked because I see some D's in there.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#10
you can use Cmajor on the G C progression.

if it is repeated the G C will resolve to Cmaj

if you repeat G D or even change to G D and repaet G D the tonic will change to Gmajor so use that (GMAJOR) over G D

so in short

G C G C G C G C
CMAJOR

G D G D G D G D
GMAJOR

G C G D
G MAJOR

G C G C G C G C G D G D G D G D G D
Cmajor then tonic changes to Gmajor

or at least that is how i see it resolving
#12
It's in G. Instead of trying to use different scales, try emphasizing different notes. The 4th is often considered an "avoid tone", try using it a lot and seeing how it sounds where. Try arpeggio-based lines, maybe using chromatic passing tones. Very rarely is the solution just another scale.
#13
Quote by ouchies
^ Why would you switch scales when it clearly fits into one scale?


Because the first progression doesn't resolve to G.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
Quote by ouchies
^ Why would you switch scales when it clearly fits into one scale? I supposed you can do it that way but just using G Major makes much more sense..


well with this many chords it can go either way but basically what i was thinking is

Gmajor is perfectly fine and there is nothing wrong woth that at all

i was just thinking as G C repeats your ear will hear Cmajor (I V I) and maybe not untill G D (I V I) will it hear Gmajor. but i think because it is a repeating progression the G C willl resolve stronger to Cmaj and the tonic will change as the G D repeats itself to Gmajor

so if we look at G C G C G C G C(G C G D G) D G D G D G D

G C would be V I V I V I V I in CMAJOR

the ( ) is where it would modulated and creates the I IV I V I i don't know how to notate the V taking over as the tonic

and then G D - I V I V I V I V in GMAJOR

but it is so simple it can go either way for the scale.

as there is no F# anywhere and I IV I IV I IV I V I V I V I V works just as good but because the G C is repeating it is stronger to the ear to be CMAJ

i don't know i just like looking at things from more than one angle but i agree with you guys aswell.

but really it can go either way
Last edited by lbc_sublime at Aug 13, 2008,
#15
Quote by Archeo Avis
Because the first progression doesn't resolve to G.
400% of worship music starts with a I IV in G. Plagal cadences are pretty damn strong too and it's ambiguous until an F or F# is played.
#16
Its in freakin G Major.... period.

G = I
C = IV
D = V


to the TS:

If you want something thats not "sweet".... try minor. As far as limits are concerned thats you.... not the scale. (no offense but its true or you wouldn't be asking this in the 1st place)

also rather than trying different scales, try focusing on musical ideas like melody and phrasing. You already have the right scales (or what would be most commonly used).

Quote by Stash Jam
^thats in G major, but yeah it's not a modal progression so G major or G blues is the way to go there


post # 3 = answer.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 13, 2008,
#17
these are just my thougts i am not saying i am 100% but thats ok it just makes more sence to me

2 repeating tones are always gonna resolve to the strongest relationship in this case V-I. it reapeats enouph for C to become the tonic and resolve stronger than I IV and the the G D repeats enouph to change easily to I V to Gmajor.

if it was not a repeating progression for like 10 bars each, i would agree wiht you but i think this is more correct i guess
#18
Munky has it; you don't need a crazy scale idea. Your phrasing will bring out whatever you're trying to say, so work on that more than trying to find an "interesting" scale.
#20
Quote by ouchies
^It can be either way.

You can use G major or C major

edit: oops didn't see that the second part was G-D-G-D


Its strict G major. You can use G MAJOR pentatonic (make sure its not minor).
Whats wrong with minor pentatonics over major progressions? I like that sort of sound, you might too.

I dont think it goes well the other way though, major pentatonics over minor chords.
#22
Quote by ouchies
It sounds completely amateur to me. Unless its a dominant chord which is fine and bluesy.

minor pentatonic 1 b3 4 5 b7

Major seven chord 1 3 5 7..

Ouch.

I can't think of one song that uses minor pentatonic over a major progression.. (not including usage over a dominant chord).
Yeah, minor pentatonics suck over major seventh chords. But they sound ok over major chords and pretty good over dominant chords.
#24
^Or there is no seventh.

Personally though, I'd probably never play C minor pentatonic over a pretty diatonic C major progression. It's a different sort of clash than the bluesy dissonance, the kind that makes you sound like you don't know how to play in key.
#25
^ Yeah basically you'll sound like a complete tool.

Quote by grampastumpy
^Or there is no seventh.

Personally though, I'd probably never play C minor pentatonic over a pretty diatonic C major progression. It's a different sort of clash than the bluesy dissonance, the kind that makes you sound like you don't know how to play in key.


Well to me, there is always some kind of seventh implied anyway. The only times I would use a minor pentatonic on a major chord is on a static major chord, a mixo vamp or if i'm passing over a dominant chord.
Last edited by ouchies at Aug 14, 2008,