#1
I know it would be helpful to learn all of them, but isn't it more logical to just learn the basic scale and know how much higher it goes with each mode, its all the same notes but different positioning.
#3
Quote by Lrn2play
I know it would be helpful to learn all of them, but isn't it more logical to just learn the basic scale and know how much higher it goes with each mode, its all the same notes but different positioning.

There's arguably little point in learning mode patterns, because like you said, the patterns are exactly the same as the major scale. If you have a good enough knowledge of the major scale and know when you can use modes and how they apply and are derived then that should be enough.
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#4
One easy way to learn them is on the piano, they're all basically playing the white notes but starting at different positions. For example, the major scale is playing all the white notes from C, the mixolydian is all the white notes from G, the Phrygian is all the white notes from D and so on.
#5
In my experience, learning modes as degrees of the major scale too early will just confuse you. A few of my students wanted to learn modes (damn metal heads) so I taught them as degrees of the major scale, but once they learned that they had no idea how to use them, so I taught them the alterations instead.

They get it now, so learn the alterations instead.
#6
Quote by Lrn2play
I know it would be helpful to learn all of them, but isn't it more logical to just learn the basic scale and know how much higher it goes with each mode, its all the same notes but different positioning.


I think as you learn them, it sort of sinks in as a hybrid kind of thing... imagine you're playing a scale of G major across the strings... you start on the low G, up to the A on the high E and come back down again... now when you move positions and play the same notes starting on A, and go a little bit higher, I think most people get it that you can think about what you're doing in two ways... yes, you're playing in G major but starting on A, but you're also playing the notes from A dorian... I don't think it's as black and white as deciding to think about it one way or the other

I do think it's important to understand how modes are related to one another, and how each mode resembles the one a fifth away from it but with one note flattened or sharpened in a strict sequence (making lydian the most 'major' mode of the lot)

oh, Slappy... Phrygian would be the white notes from E
#7
Quote by Lrn2play
I know it would be helpful to learn all of them, but isn't it more logical to just learn the basic scale and know how much higher it goes with each mode, its all the same notes but different positioning.


Modes are not just "the same notes with different positioning". They are a musical system entirely separate from key based music.
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
There's arguably little point in learning mode patterns, because like you said, the patterns are exactly the same as the major scale. If you have a good enough knowledge of the major scale and know when you can use modes and how they apply and are derived then that should be enough.


learning the mode patterns is just as helpful as learning the Major and minor scale patterns.

Learn ........don't avoid learning things that are helpful. ( patterns are very helpful )

Quote by Archeo Avis
Modes are not just "the same notes with different positioning". They are a musical system entirely separate from key based music.


they are not "entirely separate". They are very related, and can be used interchangeably within a single piece of music.

But yes there is more to it than "the same notes with different positioning".

Quote by Lrn2play
I know it would be helpful to learn all of them, but isn't it more logical to just learn the basic scale and know how much higher it goes with each mode, its all the same notes but different positioning.


You have to get past the "they have the same notes" concept..... D dorian is not C major regardless of the shared key signature.

modes are unique scales in their own right. They have their own unique formula and sound. Learn them just as you would any other scale.
Learn the patterns, learn what they sound like, and if your ready for it, learn theory to understand how to apply them.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 13, 2008,