#1
If you are playing a major scale, and want to know what the relative minor scale would be, go down 3 frets from the root of the scale. (down in sound)

So you have to go down 3 frets (in sound) from the root and then play the PATTERN of the minor scale? But those aren't the same notes or are they?
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#2
O.O

if you want to know the relative major of E minor, you go 3 notes up from the 12th fret (E note) and you'll find the G note there, which means, E minor is the relative minor of G major and vice-versa
#3
down as in towards the nut?

---------------------------
---------------------------
---------------------------
---------------------------
-----3-5-7-8-10-12-14-15---
---------------------------

is c major

----------------------------
----------------------------
----------------------------
---------------------------
-----0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12------
----------------------------

is A minor

can you see how they fit?

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#4
you go down three semitones from the root note of the major scale to find the relative minor. then the different pattern for the scales means that you do end up playing the same notes, but in a different order.
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#5
you just move the root note up 3 fret to get the relative major and down 3 to get the relative minor (the patterns stay exactly the same because all the notes in a relative scale are the same)
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#6
the pattern stays in the same place only the root note changes
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#7
I think I briefly touched on this subject in this post in your earlier thread...you've been given all the information you need, you now need to spend some time studying and absorbing it. Asking that same question over and over again won't make you understand the answer any better.

Quote by steven seagull
Any relative scale is a scale that uses the same notes as another one, so every major scale has a relative minor, as well as a relative Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian and Locrian. It's easier if you look at the scale over a couple of octaves. If we take C major and it's intervals it looks like this,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7    <----scale degree
C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C <----note
W W H W W W H W W H W W W H <----interval


the natural minor is the same as the Aeolian mode which starts from the 6th degree of the major scale, so we can section that out to give us the the relative minor which is A minor

1 2 3 4 5 [ 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 ] 7    <----scale degree
C D E F G [ A B C D E F G A ] B C <----note
W W H W W [ W H W W H W W ] W H <----interval


if you can, imagine it as a slide rule...you simply slide the brackets to the correct degree to give you that realtive scale, so to the 2nd degree which is the D note for D Dorian, 3rd degree E for E Phrygian and so on. It works both ways too, so if you look at the A minor scale and move the bracket so that you're at the major scale pattern of intervals of WWHWWWH it'll take you back to C, which also tells you that the relative major of a minor scale starts on the 3rd note of the minor scale

The relative minor get's referred to a lot because we guitarists tend to favour minor scales for soloing and also because we tend to navigate around using shapes. Remember, the relative minor has the same notes as the equivalent major, so A minor has the same notes as C major. That means if you want to play in C major you can simply use the shapes of the relative minor...you're not actually playing in the realtive minor because it's all governed by the tonal centre and key you're in, however rock guitar uses a lot of minor keys and we tend to be more familiar with the shapes of the minor scale so it's an easier way to remember where to go. It's a quick fix for playing instant country, instead of playing in the normal minor pentatonic shift the shape down 3 frets to give you the notes of the pentatonic major.
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