#1
I was wondering about this lately. No this one is not about the music and production aspect of the band but what makes a band remain intact and not break apart.

I see a lot of bands form and then break up in a couple of months and a lot of musicians over here consistently looking for bands and things not quite working out for them. So what is it that makes a band successful?
Is it the chemistry between the musicians, is it cuz everyone's got similar influences, is it cuz all the band members are chasing a similar sound and goal for the band? What does it all come down to?
I've seen a lot of bands where all the musicians have different influences and musical tastes but they still manage to keep a healthy musical relationship in the band and become successful. While some bands, even when all the musicians are looking for the same thing, don't last more than a few months. I guess all it takes is one weak link to destroy a band. Or the band mates lose interest in the band. Or the band loses its creative drives and ends up at a dead end. Or the band members don't get along with eachother well. What is it?

So i'ld like to ask you musicians here, what do you look for in a band to join one and what makes you remain in the band and make things work. And also what makes you leave bands or not work out with musicians. What is it that you're looking for when you post an add or reply to one and when you turn up for an audition or look to audition someone??

This could bring us some light as to what musicians are actually looking for and how to form the successful band.

Maybe axemanchris can give some good advise with all great his experience here!!!
#2
either a control issue or irresponsibility of the bandmates. stuff like not showing up for practice/showing up late for stuff.
#3
chemistry between the band etc

for big bands they sometimes break up cause they simply get to controled from the labels so they cant do what they want classic example wolf mother

1 album - four years touring

YAY thats sounds fun NOT

dream theater

all albums are done there way except for falling into infinity where the record labels put rules down, these rules nearly broke the band

so basically its when music becomes a strict buisness is what ruins them
#4
Musical Indifference for some bands. Look at Wolfmother who broke up last week, Chris Ross said that there was a musical indifference, I think that's what he said, and that's why they couldn't get along. Like in my band, I have a hard time with my bass player, because he wants us to play metal and hardcore stuff, when the drummer and I want to play funk and rock. So pretty much different musical tastes are it. I know alot of guys in my school who dropped out of bands, because someone in the band wanted to cover a song they didn't.
#5
Look for good, laid back open-minded musicians. Kinda hard when your a teenager, but ultimately if you find them, you'll have fun. Also, people need to be at least okay with the music being made.
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#6
A band that really enjoys what they are doing and has a good time when doing so.
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#7
Quote by Martindecorum
chemistry between the band etc

for big bands they sometimes break up cause they simply get to controled from the labels so they cant do what they want classic example wolf mother

1 album - four years touring

YAY thats sounds fun NOT

dream theater

all albums are done there way except for falling into infinity where the record labels put rules down, these rules nearly broke the band

so basically its when music becomes a strict buisness is what ruins them

Yeah, but i'm talking about bands who have just formed and work for like a few months then break up... Not going as far as signed bands... Just bands you have formed in the past that didn't work out n all... Why didn't it work out? And what do you look for in a band while joining it?
Quote by messiah01
Musical Indifference for some bands. Look at Wolfmother who broke up last week, Chris Ross said that there was a musical indifference, I think that's what he said, and that's why they couldn't get along. Like in my band, I have a hard time with my bass player, because he wants us to play metal and hardcore stuff, when the drummer and I want to play funk and rock. So pretty much different musical tastes are it. I know alot of guys in my school who dropped out of bands, because someone in the band wanted to cover a song they didn't.

Yup, but some bands like Nightwish. All the members come from different musical backgrounds and have different musical tastes but still work like a dream. Even the guys in Tool have different musical influences and have still held on for almost 2 decades.

I know the key is where all the band members enjoy the music and have fun making it. But how do you achieve that?
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Aug 13, 2008,
#8
Not being the only f*cking one who knows a bit of theory or actually wants to jam and does not start playing some random stuff in the middle of a jam. God that pisses me off.
"My name is Forrest, Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump"
#9
I know some people leave bands just because the other members just aren't very good at their instruments, this happened to me actually, i just wanted to get to play with musicians who actually know music and are good with it. also, a lot of times its just disagreements in musical tastes, and thats ok if you want to play a different kind of music from your bandmates, you should leave and play what you want. I think you should try to find someone who has similar musical tastes and is open to play things even if they're not within their personal tastes of music.
#10
Quote by giiii
Not being the only f*cking one who knows a bit of theory or actually wants to jam and does not start playing some random stuff in the middle of a jam. God that pisses me off.


Lol I hate that too. I mean, I remember when when I was guilty of that but now I actually know what I'm doing. It sucks when people don't and you're trying to jam.

I think, though, that in order to have a successful band, it really helps if everyone is on the same page about what everyone wants out of the band. If everyone is working towards the same goal and doing that together, the chances of the band being successful are much greater.
#11
Great question!!

Hopefully my answer might not be too long...

A few angles here:

What breaks bands up, especially in the early stages (ie. first year)

-priorities - someone decides that getting laid by new girlfriend is more important than showing up for practice.
-lack of commitment - those flaky fly-by-night types who reflect later that "it seemed like a good idea at the time."
-feeling like you don't belong - maybe you're on the dumping end of someone else's power struggle, maybe a control freak in the band who shuts you out of decisions, maybe being consistently out-voted in the democratic band process, etc.
-different goals - one guy wants to get signed and tour the world, another wants to show off for friends and drink free beer.
-personality conflicts - usually the result of immaturity, fueled by insecurity or any of the above points already listed, sometimes the person is just an idiot.
-musical differences - often going hand-in-hand with something else above.
-communication problems - somebody said something that was interpreted the wrong way, somebody lacked tact or diplomacy; someone forgot to tell somebody something important, etc.


So.... if you can avoid those things, then you're on the right track.

What we focus on when looking for members (we've replaced a drummer and a guitarist in the three-ish years we've been together) are the following (and we're very clear about these things when we put out ads):

-the right *person* for the job - we actually sit down and chat about stuff... goals, etc. over a coffee or other refreshing beverage (or at least over the phone) even before we get together and jam with him. You can often weed out people more efficiently that way than having a dozen people all show up and jam. Among our goals for that meeting is to get a sense of "do we like this guy?"
-similar goals/expectations - If people want or expect different things, yer screwed.


It's not really an issue how well they play, believe it or not. At least, as long as they are able to play the material they need to play and play it well. For what we're doing, we don't need Neil Peart or Nuno Bettencourt, so who cares if they are virtuosos?

It's not really an issue as much, either, what they listen to, or what they have played in the past. As you mature, your tastes inevitably broaden. With that broadening, there is bound to be some significant overlap. None of us share the same 'favourite bands' for the most part, though I'm the only guy who's only a casual Rush fan, while the others are pretty hyped on them. No biggie. What DOES matter is whether or not those experiences along the way and that broadening of your musical palate have brought you to a similar place NOW. I used to play early Metallica and all sorts of hair metal stuff. Our other guitar player was in a Rush tribute band. At the moment, where we are now, we do a good job of meeting in the middle on a lot of common ground.

Two other biggies:

Communication:

We have a system where 90% of our communication is by email. We have one email address that is set up to forward an email to each of us, so an email sent to ???@now-here-this.com will be received by everyone. The expectation is that most emails go to that address. That way, we are all getting the same message. There is no "well you told him that.... " kind of thing. Everyone gets the same message.

In rare cases, it is necessary to send an email to just one or two of us, but that is rare - ex. if somebody needs to be told something, yet might feel centered out if it is sent to everyone. Kind of 'praise publically, scold privately" kind of thing. Nobody likes to be made a spectacle of. Maturity and discretion are really important... as is trusting that everyone has the best interest of the band and its members at heart.


Compromise:

I don't think a democracy is the best choice, personally. Everyone needs to feel valued, and by being only one vote of four or one vote of five doesn't go very far towards feeling valued. Some issues - things that are divisive - I think should be unanimous. For us, it was the issue of what to do if there is a decent gig and one of us can't make it. Do we get a 'rent-a-player' to fill in? Our ultimate decision - even though the 'vote' (not a formal vote - more of a discussion) was 3:1 in favour was that we would not do it. We chose that out of respect for the person who voted against it. Because it was a potentially divisive issue, we agreed that it should be unanimously approved, or flushed away.

Now, it works two ways... as much as you might be expected to suck something up from time to time and take one for the team.... you get your moments too where the band will do something for little other reason than to keep you happy.

As soon as someone feels unvalued, they're gone.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Aah, Chris...
That was some amazing feedback from you!!! You've thrown in some excellent points in there and i think thats exactly where most bands keep failing.

I'm working on a little band idea here and am planning on holding auditions for the musicians sometime in mid september (after my exams). I've been in bands before which after a while just seemed to drag along and eventually die out. So this time i wanna plan it out right so that i can find the perfect musicians to form the perfect band.

I don't have a very elaborate plan of what the band should sound like, as i've seen in the past being too rigid with how you want your music to sound like just makes other band members lose interest. This time i've just got a basic idea for all the other band members to work upon and together shape the music in a collective way. And i wouldn't want some elitist virtuoso players either. Just half-decent musicians who are dedicated and enthusiastic bout the whole thing.

The major part of it is choosing the right musicians. You've gotta make sure you (and the rest of the band or how much of it) can get along with the dude and can like him. If you can't get along with the person and can't seem to function on the same wavelength, then there's no point in jumping straight to auditioning him. So a good long talk with the musician before the audition is important to see how well the chemistry between him and the rest of the band is. (One big mistake i used to make in the past where i used to audition first and go for a chat later!).

Buy yeah, Chris, you've hit the nail on the head there. Some really good points there on how to successfully manage a band and make sure all the band members feel important and significant all of the time. And i never believed in the democratic way of leading a band anyway. That way the band usually just ends up going nowhere with all the members a little lost. Atleast in the starting stages.

Hmm so basically to form a successful band you first need to find the right musicians for the band and make sure they all get along really well with eachother and can have fun making music with no differences (which is the toughest job!). Then it doesn't end there. Once you've successfully formed the band, you've gotta make sure all the members are enjoying their time in the band are stay dedicated towards working for the band. Everyone's gotta feel significant in the band and know its their band. And at the end of all maturity is what it takes.
#13
Cookies is what makes a successful band. Forget about what axemanchris said, keep baking cookies and they will keep coming.

Thats how it works right? :p

I kid, very good advice chris.
Quote by hostilekid
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Quote by GoldenBlues
So I was wondering, are black people capable feeling love? I mean can their brains comprehend that kind of emotion, or are they not programmed that way.
#14
My music taste changed over a period of a month. Its quite easy to be playing something like (true) metal, and the next month you just want to do jazz. Things can fluctuate.
: )
#15
@ATF - you got it!

Thanks for the feedback.... I was worried that I was spouting off a big wall of text that nobody was going to read.

@cjk - That's true, but as long as people remain committed to a direction, and have enough overlap between them to find common ground, even that can go. Well... maybe not THAT extreme... haha

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by axemanchris
@ATF - you got it!

Thanks for the feedback.... I was worried that I was spouting off a big wall of text that nobody was going to read.

@cjk - That's true, but as long as people remain committed to a direction, and have enough overlap between them to find common ground, even that can go. Well... maybe not THAT extreme... haha

CT

You always give brilliant advice so you posts never go unread! Atleast not by me!!
Well, the ones i come across... usually!
#17

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
Quote by Cjk10000
My music taste changed over a period of a month. Its quite easy to be playing something like (true) metal, and the next month you just want to do jazz. Things can fluctuate.


After that you realize you like both, and mix them in your music. Look at what Paul Waggoner did. Sooner or later you would move from metal, to jazz, then soon bluegrass.
Quote by hostilekid
shadesofanger, you're my hero.


Quote by GoldenBlues
So I was wondering, are black people capable feeling love? I mean can their brains comprehend that kind of emotion, or are they not programmed that way.
#19
Quote by shadesofanger
Sooner or later you would move from metal,


age 18.... no grey yet.....

Quote by shadesofanger
to jazz,


age 40... the salt and pepper years....

Quote by shadesofanger
then soon bluegrass.


age 50+...I'll hit ya with my cane if you make fun of the ban-JO ever again!!



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
i find that it works out easier if everyone's involved, rather than having one chief-song-writer.
of late, my new band have been collaberating, rather than in my previous band where i would write all the songs. Its much more fun in the new band because even though im drummer, i still get to help out on the writing, as everyone in the band is also a guitarist.
#21
It's all to do with individual band member's attitudes really.
A lot of young band members will act as if they are in a personal relationship with the other band members, someone goes and jams with some different buddies and suddenly he's accused of cheating on the band and divorce papers are drawn up, know what I mean?
It's uncalled for, it's silly, but it's still one the biggest causes of band splits out there. (But you never seem to see older bands have this problem, must be an experience thing eh?)
You're in a band not a personal relationship so a person's individual right to do whatever or jam with whoever he pleases in his own free time is very important.
It's important that everyone in a band is in it it primarily to enjoy themselves and that any profit made, even if it's really been worked hard for, is treated as nothing more than a nice bonus. Otherwise what happens is that bands get obsessed with making money and end up arguing, over money.
Being thick skinned helps too. The ability for one band member to call another band member a 'Butt ugly, motherf*cking, bastard of a c*nt on a dog sh!te!' to his face without anyone getting upset and taking it personally is definately a great advantage when you are sharing a van for hours and hours at a time and obviously helps to avoid arguments, but it also serves as a means of stress relief. Kinda like a valve on a pressure cooker.
Communication is paramount, everyone should know what their roll is and what is expected of them, as well as what band business is taking place. To this end regular meetings, without the instruments, are important.

Most importantly of all, it's important that your band members can socialise together and actualy enjoy each other's company, get that right at the beginning and it avoids a hell of a lot of problems later down the line.

Quote by axemanchris
age 18.... no grey yet.....


age 40... the salt and pepper years....


age 50+...I'll hit ya with my cane if you make fun of the ban-JO ever again!!



CT



The weird thing is, once you hit 60, you suddenly develop a taste for the Rolling Stones which completely revives your taste in rock music.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 15, 2008,
#22
Quote by axemanchris
age 18.... no grey yet.....


age 40... the salt and pepper years....


age 50+...I'll hit ya with my cane if you make fun of the ban-JO ever again!!



CT


What I meant was a reference to Between the Buried and Me song "Ants of the Sky" I think Paul does actually does use a banjo during recording for the bluegrass bit.
Quote by hostilekid
shadesofanger, you're my hero.


Quote by GoldenBlues
So I was wondering, are black people capable feeling love? I mean can their brains comprehend that kind of emotion, or are they not programmed that way.
#23
Despite what some people say, a band IS in fact a personal relationship. You go through alot of hard times and alot of **** with these selected few, but you just gotta roll with it. You come into the band as a friend and sooner or later you all become family.
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#24
It's a business partnership that depends on positive personal interactions in order to be successful. To use that to keep things in perspective would help a lot of bands.

I totally agree with Slack here. Nobody is questioning that you have to get along - in fact, it is critical. But remembering that it is professional/business first is key.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#25
A band is based a lot on trust. This will be a big case when a band gets big and starts touring. The only people they truly have is each other, and their futures are all based on each other getting along and doing their best. There can't be concerns about someone being angry at you or members turning against another member, as that will just introduce anarchy. You really have to be able to trust each other.

A band needs to either be really good at collaborating and making complex decisions. Or there should be a really strong prominent force in which everyone trusts the direction of. However it's really hard for a band to get anywhere when every member has different goals, and no common goal is ever established and believed in by every member.
#26
Chemistry is the most important in my opinion. If you can't get a long as a band, and can't really click together, especially in those first few crucial months, it will be over before it has even started.

If you can't even get along with each other, how are you expose to start playing shows and things of that nature.
#27
Quote by Thescottsman
Despite what some people say, a band IS in fact a personal relationship. You go through alot of hard times and alot of **** with these selected few, but you just gotta roll with it. You come into the band as a friend and sooner or later you all become family.

My point was that some band members act as if they were actualy married to each other rather than acting as if a bunch of really good friends had just put a band together.
Yes, a band is a personal relationship, it's quite often a friendship that is verging upon the kind of relationship one would have with a brother or sister, but it should never be that personal that it resembles a married couple relationship with arguments over the slightest things, not so personal that someone should be getting jealous if you hang around with other musicians outside the band.
That's the point where someone is taking the band too seriously. It's also the point where the band stops being fun, and that is the all important number one rule in bands, it has to be fun.
What I'm saying is that everyone needs a bit of space now and then, especialy musicians. They need to gain artistic influence from sources outside of the band and occasionaly explore avenues that the band itself would never explore, it's what keeps music fresh, bright, vibrant and interesting.
Having an 'US AGAINST THE WORLD' mentality can be a good thing, but sometimes, that 'US AGAINST THE WORLD' mentality is the same mentality that causes the paranoid little voice at the back of someone's mind to say, 'Why is he jamming with that guy so much? Why isn't he drinking with the rest of the band? Is he thinking of leaving the band? I must protect my assets. If he leaves, what copyright do I own of our back catalogue?' It keeps everyone 'tied' together and can actualy stop people from exploring other avenues of music which in turn makes people feel trapped in a band, the music becomes jaded, and it stops being fun.

A prime example would be the Beatles. They had that same 'US AGAINST THE WORLD' mentality, and to an extent, it served them very well. They became the biggest band in the world, ever.
They were very close as mates, then they became even closer, like brothers, all their business interests were tied together in Apple Corps Ltd, they even took their holidays together, they became cut off from the rest of the world and started acting like they were married to each other, especily Lennon and McCartney, then when John Lennon met an avant-garde artist and musician called Yoko Ono and started to spend a lot of time with her, the rest of the band alienated him for having creative interests outside of the band, and that was the beginning of the end for the Beatles.
It was nothing to do with him having a sexual affair with the woman, c'mon, he was in a band that had toured all over the world, took drugs and attended a lot of freaky 60s parties, they all had affairs behind their sexual partners backs.
They put up an icy wall between themselves and Lennon because he'd brought an outsider to rehearsals and recording sessions, even though she did nothing more than sit silently while The Beatles got on with business. It was an attitude that would never have happened when they were just a bunch of friends starting up a bar band in Liverpool.
Lennon didn't like being treated that way and the band soon split after that.

Somewhere along the lines, they'd lost that element of 'four mates just having fun playing music' that they had in the 60s. The fun and enjoyment of working together as friends had gone and was replaced with a 'married' mentality that caused cirtain members to feel trapped, something that for artistic personalities is pure poison, and it spelt the end for the band.
And like a lot of marrage divorces, it became messy with lawsuits flying all over the place.
Things would never be the same among them again and before they had a chance to make up, stop the lawsuits and become just 4 mates making music again, Lennon was murdered.
A sad end to the most influencial band in the history of mankind which should serve as a warning to other bands of the importance of keeping that 'mates' mentality and avoiding that 'married' mentality within bands.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 15, 2008,
#28
Quote by axemanchris
@ATF - you got it!

Thanks for the feedback.... I was worried that I was spouting off a big wall of text that nobody was going to read.

CT



WOW dude. Yur post pretty much gave a buttload of good tips and sum up pretty much everything that breaks a band. I even bookmarked this thread so I can reffer back to this. Im also ganna show this to all my band members (or band member, drummer -.-) and all the people that join later on. Hell I might even put this up in our practice area.


Also may I add, if no one caught this, that all members must stay dedicated.

It's pretty straight foward that if noone's interested in pushing foward that noone's ganna wanna 'waste' their time showing up.

Have a group talk with the band. Determine what the band's major priority is and acknolegde all the small steps along the way it will take to get to that point.

And im talking about near-soon goals. Not get huge sell millions of copies and get laid every night. Not only is that just aiming to sell out and abuse music for money, but its also too much of a distance from your current standing.

Goals like, get 2 songs done in a mounth for a gig is realistic.

Hope that helped
bro0otal

Drummer



Guitarist___________Bassist________________Vox______________________Lead Guitarist
______________________________________________________
#29
@banana - thanks, man!

-about being fun...

While it is possible to make a living playing music in a band, it rarely happens. Even when it does, you hardly fall into the category of 'well off' unless you're that lucky one in a zillion to become a bona fide 'rock star.'

So, from that perspective, let's say you have a choice of two jobs. Each pays the same.... let's arbitrarily pick $30 000.

Job 1 - Full time, weekdays 9-5 at a rate of $15/hr. No overtime, no weekends, no nights, two weeks holidays, basical medical and dental coverage. Job is reasonably secure enough that unless you really screw up, you're reasonably well assured of having the same job next year. Hey, you might even move up within the company.

Job 2 - Radically irregular hours, 7 days a week. Generally working evenings and weekends, often quite late. Might work 18 hours one day, 3 the next, none for the next two days, and then three more days in a row of 18 hours each. The odd day off, but not at your choosing. No holidays, no medical or dental coverage. Job is about as secure as a house of cards. Work could begin to diminish at any time, mostly without warning, and you could be entirely unemployed the next year. No opportunities for promotion. Job involves enough travelling that you may be unable to see family or friends for weeks or even months at a time. Accommodation and food and travel at your own expense, so if you sleep, eat and drive cheap, you get to take home a bit more money.

Which one would YOU choose?

The only reason you would ever choose number 2 is if you were really enjoying the whole musical side of the job. To do that job with people you can't get along with would be absolute hell, I would think.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
^Well put Chris.

Many young musicians just starting out and dreaming of becoming a professional musician have no idea of the hard work and unsavoury hours that awaits them, and quite often it can come as a great shock.

You set off on your first real tour and the first couple of gigs are an absolute thrill to play and during this time you're that pumped up with adrenaline that you have an almost limitless amount of energy, then as the tour progresses, and you've had your share of late nights, drinks, parties, humping a ton of gear between the van and the stage as quickly as you can and trying to get whatever sleep you can in a moving vehicle.
Then there's the nature of the gigging performance itself, which means your body instantly goes from 0 to 150mph, then stays at 150mph for the next few hours, then stops dead (the end of the gig) then hits 200mph for another 20 minutes, (getting your gear off stage and into the van) then more socialising, which involves more drinks and partying, every night, then just as you're starting to find your touring stride and get into some sort of routine, you have a couple of afternoon gigs or radio interviews to do which seem easy enough to do when we're just talking about them but are infact actualy, once you're in the middle of a tour, incredibly hard to motivate yourself to do.
Which depresses you.
Then you discover that your tour itinery includes a few days together where you have been booked to do an afternoon gig and a nightime gig on the same day, and all you want is a night off, just one night off, you just want to curl up on 'your' settee in 'your' home in front of 'your' TV and have a nice quiet night with a cup of cocoa, just chillin' out.
But you can't, which depresses you more.

It's no wonder so many bands get into drugs, especialy the uppers and downers, and there's no end of people that you'll meet who will offer to sell you some.
One pill to make you sleep, another pill to wake you up and fill you with energy.
They'll get you through another few gigs and you may even start to feel better for a little while, but then you start relying on the pills to get you through, which are all the while being added to the constant supply of alcohol that you get from playing in venues that have bars and owners who say 'Great gig, fancy a drink on the house?' and punters who say 'Great gig, whaddaya drinking?' or even theatre owners who say 'Hi guys, this is the stage, and your dressing room is over there with your rider in it.' And you're hoping and praying to God that the rider will be real food, something different from the kebabs or pizza, you'd even settle for sandwiches or even fruit, but no... it's another couple of crates of beer.
Then the pills start having side effects, like making you cranky, possibly even paranoid, and to make things worse, the whole band are taking them too.
You're all tired, you hate each other and you've still got to finish this damn tour.
Suddenly your first tour, the moment you've dreamed about for years, has turned into the mother of all nightmares, you want to quit, you feel like you're about to have a nervous breakdown, but you're under contract to do another 15 shows.
AAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGHHH!.....


....You come back from your first tour and you have to go into re-hab just so you can return to some sort of normality. Then you have to find some sort of short term employment or draw social security until the next tour, when it'll all start again, even though you swear to yourself that next time, you'll do it differently.

Sounds scary? It should!
Now, I'm not saying it's like this for everybody, but it's a fair assessment of what it 'can' be like if you're not extremely careful.
And that's part of what makes a successful band, you've gotta be able to either take what the road will throw at you or you've gotta be able to dodge the traps, while at the same time keeping your friendship with the rest of the band members intact.
#31
+100 Slacker and Axeman! noone puts the touring life into perspective. and that's a really crutial part of the music industry. i know i haven't thought about that very much. and there are the long term affects. like maybe needing to put yourself into re-hab to live a normal life. not as fun as it's cracked up to be...
#32
Good point.... long term effects.

Maybe a bit off topic, but not really. Let's look *really* far ahead into the future.

Layne Staley (sp?... Alice in Chains guy) was found dead in his apartment. He had been dead for weeks and nobody noticed. How does that happen? This guy... adored by millions of fans around the world, and yet so successfully insulated from everyone - including his friends - that he can be dead for weeks before anyone notices.

How do you manage (careful planning... strategy.....) your personal life such that you'll actually be able to have normal relationships with people when the fame is gone?

Yes, a rhetorical question, perhaps... but an interesting thought.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#33
Quote by Sonic Blast
+100 Slacker and Axeman! noone puts the touring life into perspective. and that's a really crutial part of the music industry. i know i haven't thought about that very much. and there are the long term affects. like maybe needing to put yourself into re-hab to live a normal life. not as fun as it's cracked up to be...


Cheers Sonic.

And yeah, it's not exactly the dream life that many imagine it to be, still, don't let that put you off, many bands like Aerosmith for example, have learned from their past mistakes and banned all drug taking and drinking alcohol from their tours. (After splitting up, cleaning up their individual acts, and getting back together again. Steven Tyler was once doing an interview when the interviewer said something like 'You've earned millions of dollars over the past couple of years, where has it all gone?' and he replied 'Up my nose!')
We just have to be clever enough to also learn from their mistakes and just not fall into the touring traps in the first place.

Quote by axemanchris
Good point.... long term effects.

Maybe a bit off topic, but not really. Let's look *really* far ahead into the future.

Layne Staley (sp?... Alice in Chains guy) was found dead in his apartment. He had been dead for weeks and nobody noticed. How does that happen? This guy... adored by millions of fans around the world, and yet so successfully insulated from everyone - including his friends - that he can be dead for weeks before anyone notices.

How do you manage (careful planning... strategy.....) your personal life such that you'll actually be able to have normal relationships with people when the fame is gone?

Yes, a rhetorical question, perhaps... but an interesting thought.

CT


A sad story, and one that is, even more sadly, repeated over and over again.
Bon Scott, Keith Moon, Jimmy Hendrix, Jim Morrison, John Bonham, Steve Clark, Janis Joplin, the list goes on and on of rock stars who discovered drugs and alcohol on the road and ended up dying while being completely off their skulls and all alone, and that's just the musicians in the public eye.
I personaly knew two musicians who died as a result of bad habits they first aquired on the road and I know at least a dozen more who are shadows of their former selves because of the touring lifestyle.
Infact, one of my best mates, a multi talented guy who I gigged and recorded with constantly for about 5 years, has just played his fist gig in 15 years. He had to give the whole music thing up all that time ago because of his addiction to uppers and downers and the psychosis that this developed in him, and it's taken him all this time just to get his head back in the right place.
He's not exactly the same rock 'n' roll animal that he used to be, but it's nice to have him back.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 18, 2008,
#34
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Cheers Sonic.

And yeah, it's not exactly the dream life that many imagine it to be, still, don't let that put you off, many bands like Aerosmith for example, have learned from their past mistakes and banned all drug taking and drinking alcohol from their tours. (After splitting up, cleaning up their individual acts, and getting back together again. Steven Tyler was once doing an interview when the interviewer said something like 'You've earned millions of dollars over the past couple of years, where has it all gone?' and he replied 'Up my nose!')
We just have to be clever enough to also learn from their mistakes and just not fall into the touring traps in the first place.


A sad story, and one that is, even more sadly, repeated over and over again.
Bon Scott, Keith Moon, Jimmy Hendrix, Jim Morrison, John Bonham, Steve Clark, Janis Joplin, the list goes on and on of rock stars who discovered drugs and alcohol on the road and ended up dying while being completely off their skulls and all alone, and that's just the musicians in the public eye.
I personaly knew two musicians who died as a result of bad habits they first aquired on the road and I know at least a dozen more who are shadows of their former selves because of the touring lifestyle.
Infact, one of my best mates, a multi talented guy who I gigged and recorded with constantly for about 5 years, has just played his fist gig in 15 years. He had to give the whole music thing up all that time ago because of his addiction to uppers and downers and the psychosis that this developed in him, and it's taken him all this time just to get his head back in the right place.
He's not exactly the same rock 'n' roll animal that he used to be, but it's nice to have him back.


Hey! Thanks man!

Drugs really take it out of people and they're never the same. Sad but true. It's just helpful to prepare yourself to say no before the stuff comes your way. BUT! Temptations can get really strong when the pressures are high. But sometimes it's nice to forget about all of the bad stuff and dream about all of the good parts of touring! Gigging can be really fun and makes your band really come together in a special kind of way.
#35
Quote by Sonic Blast
Hey! Thanks man!

Drugs really take it out of people and they're never the same. Sad but true. It's just helpful to prepare yourself to say no before the stuff comes your way. BUT! Temptations can get really strong when the pressures are high. But sometimes it's nice to forget about all of the bad stuff and dream about all of the good parts of touring! Gigging can be really fun and makes your band really come together in a special kind of way.


Remember, kids, you can become a mess on tour without having to injest any of those nasty, evil drugs at all !

Just remember to be as depressed and paranoid as Tom Yorke and you'll be fine! YesterdayIwokeupsucking a lemon...
YesterdayIwokeupsucking a lemon...
YesterdayIwokeupsucking a lemon...
Ev-ree-thaaaang...
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#36
There are a lot of things that play into a successful band such as:
1. Chemistry - this is important musically and when it comes to business.
2. Clear Leader - having a clear leader is very important, not a dictator. The leader keeps the band focused, mediates when needed and pushes for the success of the band if there is no manager. The leader needs to understands the members strengths and weakness in the band and utilizes them.
3. Togetherness - everyone needs to be on the same page as far as the future of the band, the sound of the band and what are the roles of each member.
4. Honesty and Respect - keeping it real with each other and respecting the other member will have you in business forever.

This is a good link to find managers, contact info for labels, major booking agents and lawyers. Also helps you draft contracts for just about anything in the music business.

http://222musicentertainment.com/Artist%20resource%20Center.html
Last edited by Eddie P at Aug 19, 2008,