#4
The notes need to correspond to the chords. In A harmonic minor, the notes are A B C D E F and G#. Thus, you probably couldn't play the harmonic minor over the G7.

If it's simply a melody, without chords, you can use Natural and Harmonic minor, and use the raised 7th as a passing tone.
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#5
Am Em F G7 is all natural minor sequence - the notes of the chords are all in the natural minor scale
The E7 has a G# in it [the major third of E] and the G# is the difference between the harmonic and natural scales.

That was very unclear I apologise
but A
natural minor--- A B C D E F G
harmonic minor-A B C D E F G# [F can be sharpened as well]

so basically, in Am it would be an Em in natural, and E in harmonic

[edit] bitch beat me! damn IM for distracting me
#6
^ Raising the 6th, F, would make it Melodic Minor.
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#8
harmonic minor really only exists to make the V chord a dominant 7 as opposed to minor 7.. so if you're going to use that major 7 in a harmonic minor key, you'd generally use it to lead the ear to the tonic...

like bangoodcharlote said, you can add it in when you have a dominant 7 chord as the V... like E7 in the key of Am (in that case, the E7 functions in the same way you use secondary dominants... you can preceed ANY diatonic chord with a dominant 7 chord a fifth above it, and get a nice satisfying resolution)
#9
Quote by inflatablefilth
like bangoodcharlote said, you can add it in when you have a dominant 7 chord as the V... like E7 in the key of Am (in that case, the E7 functions in the same way you use secondary dominants... you can preceed ANY diatonic chord with a dominant 7 chord a fifth above it, and get a nice satisfying resolution)

A regular V chord is fine, it doesn't have to be a V7 chord. The A harmonic minor would function just as well over an E chord as an E7 chord. The seventh is for harmonic purposes, as the V7 provides a stronger resolution back to i than a plain V chord.
#10
+1 bgc.

In a more melodic sense (as in writing those pretty sounding melodies pretty girls and guys with clamps over their balls sing) this is what I would do:

First off, to resolve whilst writing minor melodies, you probably should use the major seventh as it resolves really well to the root just about a semitone about it. Yes you can also resolve well by using the major second, but the major seventh works just as well and sometimes better.

If your moving from above the root to the a seventh just below the root, and you want to resolve the melody, you probably should play a major seventh (meaning harmonic minor) instead of a minor seventh. This produces a strong resolution to the root.

If you want to hit that major seventh (so you can resolve to the root) without moving from above the root (so you can move upwards in pitch, not downwards), you probably should use a Major sixth instead of a minor sixth. This is because the augmented second (same as a minor third) step the minor sixth creates with the major seventh is dissonant.

If you dont want to resolve your melody, you should use the minor seventh, as it doesnt resolve as easy.

If you want to play perfect fifth, try to use a minor sixth instead of a major sixth as the minor sixth leads better to the perfect fifth.

If you want to sound eastern, try to play that minor sixth note before or after that major seventh note. For the best effect, dont play a root note and keep that dissonance hanging.

This is why many people consider writing in minor keys more difficult than major keys. The only note out of key note in major melodies that I would use regularly is the #4, as it moves really well to the perfect fifth (which can act like a second root; therefore resolving your melodies)

/shameless repost
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
+1 bgc.

The only note out of key note in major melodies that I would use regularly is the #4, as it moves really well to the perfect fifth (which can act like a second root; therefore resolving your melodies)

So do you like to use Lydian.
Quote by demon
The only note out of key note in major melodies that I would use regularly is the #4

Though if you were writing in the key of Lydian which is a major key, then the #4 would be in.
#12
Quote by mdc
So do you like to use Lydian.

Though if you were writing in the key of Lydian which is a major key, then the #4 would be in.
Yeah, I love lydian. In some cases that #4 is better than the natural fourth 4. But in other cases, I'd rather use that natual 4th. Really determins on the situation and what my ear is saying.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It would be common to play Am G F E7, playing A natural minor over the first three chords and A harmonic minor over E7.


Switching to harmonic minor over the V chord would actually be quite rare. The use of harmonic minor in the melody was extremely uncommon before metal popularized it.
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#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
Switching to harmonic minor over the V chord would actually be quite rare. The use of harmonic minor in the melody was extremely uncommon before metal popularized it.
Please elaborate.
#16
Minor is 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

Hamonic minor is 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7

Youll notice the only difference as far as notes is harmonic minor has a natural 7.

How ever, the phrasing is usually very different.

Its very easy to write simple Egyption (sp) sounding riffs in harmonic minor.