#1
Hello Dudes and female dudes.

okay the thing is that i have a fender strat 50' classic mexican. And when i play very fast it seems to me like the strings are vibrating alot (guess this happens always, but i only notice when i play fast), and picking gets quite difficult.

but then today at school i tried to play an epiphone les paul, and allthough it sounded like **** (school guitars does that), it was alot easier for me to play, so i wonder what string gauge a les paul uses standard, and can that be aplyed for an strat? and if i did that, would i then have to adjust the trust rod?
#2
get a heavier gauge string, le pauls have different bridges than a strat, but heavier strings'll fix your problem
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#4
Well there's no "standard guage" for a guitar. Any guitar can use any guage.

Taking a clue from "vibrating a lot", I'd say you have a lighter guage on. Maybe try putting .10's, or .11's on your guitar. Watch out for the nut though, I had a guitar's nut snap off at the corner because a string was too thick.

Also, maybe try picking less hard?
#5
Quote by Roopelatvalafan
how heavy is heavy? i use 0.9 now..

That's your problem.
String gauge is way too light for fast playing, try upping it to .10 or .11
#6
okay, thanks for the tip,

I think i am hitting pretty soft, as i try to minimize hand movement, to play faster..
#7
gibson les paul use 10's as standard from the factory. you can put 10's on your strat, it probably has 9's at the moment if it is still unchanged from the factory set up.

it's unlikely that you will need truss rod adjustment, but if you have a floating bridge then it will almost certainly need adjustment for the extra tension if you go to 10's, maybe intonation adjustment also. it's worth putting 10's on a strat, sounds and plays much better.
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#8
it's unlikely that you will need truss rod adjustment, but if you have a floating bridge then it will almost certainly need adjustment for the extra tension if you go to 10's, maybe intonation adjustment also. it's worth putting 10's on a strat, sounds and plays much better.


+1
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#10
Yeah with 11's and up you'll see some sacrifice in playability.
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#11
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
Yeah with 11's and up you'll see some sacrifice in playability.


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#12
Exactly. =]
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#13
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
Yeah with 11's and up you'll see some sacrifice in playability.

I beg to differ. I don't find 11's any harder to play on then .09's(which actually feel like dental floss most of the time).

At first sure, but after about a week it isn't bad at all. My progression through string gauges went as follows. Going from .09's to .10's I felt a noticeable difference in tension. When I went from .10's to .11's I barely noticed the tension difference but the strings did feel thicker.

And you're aren't going to break your nut going up in string gauges unless you use a stupid thick E string like the one in the Zakk Wylde signature set.
Last edited by T!AN at Aug 13, 2008,
#14
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
Yeah with 11's and up you'll see some sacrifice in playability.


Not quite, 11's in standard is a great shred gauge
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#17
Quote by bchoun
That's your problem.
String gauge is way too light for fast playing, try upping it to .10 or .11

No it's not...stop being silly.

TS, the Epi felt "easier" to play because Gibsons have a shorter scale length, meaning that for any given note the string tension will be lower. That makes bending easier, but conversely means you have to bend further to hit your target pitch. I use 9's on a Les Paul, but 10's on a Les Paul will feel closest to 9's on a Strat in terms of tension. Moving to a higher string gauge is going to cause you more problems - if the Epi felt easier to paly than your strat then putting heavier strings on your strat will make it harder to play...bending in particular will be a lot more difficult.

The only problem you have is a lack of accuracy, you're trying to play too fast to soon. It's got nothing to do with your strings, just slow down and concentrate on playing things cleanly and accurately before you worry about playing them at speed.
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#18
but on the les paul i was able to play perfectly clean, and also the 9s on my strat is so soft i can easely bend the 1st sting to it hits the 4th string.. so i don't think i will get problems with bending, only thing i am worryed about is the thust rod might needing adjustment afterwards.. and i have never tryed to do that, anyway, can't hurt to try..
#19
Quote by steven seagull
TS, the Epi felt "easier" to play because Gibsons have a shorter scale length, meaning that for any given note the string tension will be lower. That makes bending easier, but conversely means you have to bend further to hit your target pitch...
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