#1
If I use the minor scales are the scale degrees still the same e.g. First note = tonic
second note = supertonic third note = mediant etc etc...
#3
Quote by Darkmessiahnz
If I use the minor scales are the scale degrees still the same e.g. First note = tonic
second note = supertonic third note = mediant etc etc...
As far as I know, this is the case.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
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#4
Quote by Darkmessiahnz
If I use the minor scales are the scale degrees still the same e.g. First note = tonic
second note = supertonic third note = mediant etc etc...

The notes that change, the third, sixth, and seventh, do not carry these names with them. If this was the case, the term "leading tone" would not make any sense because the leading tone is a half step away from the root or tonic, not a whole step. Those technical names are usually used when referring to the major scale.
#6
Quote by branny1982
^Interesting.

This is something i have always wondered. Mainly because the dominant degree is not a dominant chord!

I think i will work on the fact that the flattened degrees do not keep their names.... So do they get new names?

To be honest, I've only ever encountered using the technical names when referring to chords or the scale degrees of the major scale (and that's after four years of music school). Keep in mind they're just a tool for learning and understanding music, not a rule to be followed when writing it. I only pointed out the flatted notes of the minor scale in particular because they are the notes that change, but if I was talking about the flat 3 of the minor scale, I would simply refer to it as the flat 3, or the flat 7, or flat 6. I've never seen any special "technical" names for the notes of the minor scale, or any other scale besides the major scale. And you are correct that the chord built on the fifth scale degree of the minor scale is not a dominant chord, but read on and I think you'll find some interesting facts about how the major scale degrees got their technical names.

With these thoughts in mind, the technical names do not necessarily refer to what people think they do. The Tonic is the note on which the scale is based. The Super-Tonic is named so because it is ABOVE the Tonic (Super = above). The Mediant is in the Middle of the two important notes, the Tonic and Dominant. The Dominant is a perfect 5th away from the Tonic, a very important and powerful interval. Now the others are the interesting ones. The Sub-Dominant, or fourth scale degree, is not labelled so because it is right below the Dominant. If this were the case, why would the Sub-Mediant be labelled so considering it is not right below the Mediant? No, the Sub-dominant is a perfect fifth BELOW the Tonic, just like the Dominant is a perfect fifth ABOVE the Tonic. And the Sub-Mediant is a third BELOW the Tonic, just like the Mediant is a third ABOVE the Tonic.

Just some interesting facts to throw out there.
#8
Quote by branny1982
^Thanks, that is actually something i didn't know! But i will remember it.