#1
I made my first step into customizing my first P-bass. Instead of buying a new black pickguard I tried to save myself some money and spray-painted the original white with some Warhammer paint into a nice black color. It took me a few tries to get it right, yet it still isn't the best I could do. Still, I think it came out nicely. Here's the pic:

#2
Yeah, looks alright. It's too bad its not really glossy (unless its just the photo)

A gloss black single ply pickguard looks really good on a black P-bass. They're really cheap... so you might want to pick one up one of these days.
All my photobucket pics are dead so no links to my guitar build threads.
My Music
#4
Quote by derekwalden_-33
It will eventually chip, I havent seen a painted one that hasnt. Looks good though.

Not if you use Paint for Plastic:



This guitar is a little over 2 years old ... the pickguard and trem cover have no chips or peels:



#5
Quote by Ippon
Not if you use Paint for Plastic:



This guitar is a little over 2 years old ... the pickguard and trem cover have no chips or peels:






it doesn't look like that guitar is being used though either
#6
Quote by bderivan
it doesn't look like that guitar is being used though either

Not sure how you can tell from a picture. I have a 21-year old Fender that looks mint and it's played daily.

Also, the pic I posted was when it was being painted.

#7
That stuff does work. It actually bonds with the plastic, instead of putting a layer of color on top of it.
All my photobucket pics are dead so no links to my guitar build threads.
My Music
#9
I've heard good reviews elsewhere. Did you follow the instructions carefully?
All my photobucket pics are dead so no links to my guitar build threads.
My Music
#11
Temperature has a big impact on painting. Thats very possible. Try it on a warm day next time. Or you can warm the can in a bucket of warm water (saw that elsewhere)
All my photobucket pics are dead so no links to my guitar build threads.
My Music
#12
i spray painted my strat pickguard and used it for years and it never chipped
#13
I've done several coats of the black paint on it, enough so that it doesn't chip easily. And the paint isn't a glossy paint, because I don't like that glossy look. The body itself is glossy enough in my opinion.

Quote by zeroyon
Temperature has a big impact on painting. Thats very possible. Try it on a warm day next time. Or you can warm the can in a bucket of warm water (saw that elsewhere)


I painted on a normal day, a bit colder than normal (around 15 degrees C) with a little wind. I tend to work in the cover of our small garden house and that helps a lot. Indeed temperature plays a big role, too cold or too warm isn't good either way. What also made be a cause is the humidity. The paint won't adhere very well if the humidity is high. And one other things, always make sure that your surface you're painting on is clean and free of fat. I have had my experiences with that, so keep it in mind anyone who wants to paint their pickguard.
#15
Yeah, skin fat. When you play your bass it's almost impossible to avoid having skin fat or grease whatever they call it to wipe off on your strings and quite possibly on your pickguard. Even so, if your fingers are clean every time you play, when you're handling your pickguard you transfer finger prints on the plastic. That quite shows and can cause the paint to resist adhering to the surface. You'll get ugly marks on the guard then.