#1
does anyone the differences in their use when used in Analogue and Digital Mixers?
#2
Analog mixers are mostly used for large interfaces without preamps such as the M-Audio Delta 1010.
The Digital mixers mostly have optical outputs for use with MTRs, (such as the Alesis HD24) when recording live bands on location. They also feature on board FX such as reverb, compressors, and EQ so you dont need to bring outboard rack mount FX.

Tweaks guide linked in my sig goes over mixers:
http://www.tweakheadz.com/choosing_a_mixer_for_your_studio.html

Some Digi mixers can also be used as a control surface such as the Tascam DM3200
#3
I don't know if this is a function of the meters or how they measure, but roughly 0dbfs in analogue = between -12 and -20dbfs in digital.

What that means is, if you take an analog source that it putting out a signal at 0dbfs, and plug it into a digital source making no gain adjustments, the digital meter will show roughly -15dbfs.

Great question. But why do we care about this?

Well... a lot of people think (and this held some truth back in the 16-bit recording days) that you need to peg your meters pretty close to 0db to get a good usable signal. Not so. If you set your input levels in a digital recorder (using 24 bit recording) so that the average level is somewhere around -15db, you leave yourself TONS of headroom (no need for external compressors!) and still have a very usable signal level for your recorded source. Not only that, you end up with a cleaner signal.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
No prob.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Very good post Chris, but I think you've got a terminology wrong. 0dBfs is 0dBfs, the full scale does not change. Now what might read as 0dB on a digital piece of equipment is listed in FS, 0 is 0 and once you hit it you clip, there is no headroom. Now 0dB on an analog board, due to their nature of being, well analog, can be anywhere from -1dBfs to -40dBfs, depending on how the equipment is biased. Where as on analog gear, the equivelant to 0dBfs is usually in the area of +24dB on the meters.

To sum up my point, there is no such thing as 0dBfs in analog because analog is not measured in full scale, otherwise it'd just clip horribly like digital when it hit 0 and ran out of headroom.
#7
Well done, sir. I stand corrected.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.