#1
Hello everyone. I am a self taught guitarist and was wonders how do I play sharps??

I dont know if that made any sense because im dumb when it comes to anything with theory. But for example , how would I play a G#m chord from a Gm chord or how would I play a C#m7 chord? Im confused and have searched but I might have missed it. Can someone point me the way or give me a link to a tutorial? Sorry if this has been posted already.
#2
Do you know your basic barre chords with the root on the sixth and fifth strings? Do you know what I'm talking about? Let me know and we'll go further with this.
#3
sadly. I have no idea. I know barre chords but I think I have trouble finding the root note.
#4
OK, there are two options here.

1) Grab a chord dictionary (book with a bunch of chord charts in it) and lookup the chord you're looking for. Temporary solution that requires memorization.

2) Start learning the notes on the neck. Start off with the low E string and the A string.

Without knowing the notes on the neck, figuring out chords on the spot is going to be pretty much impossible. I'm not saying you need to memorize them all at once by tomorrow or anything, but start paying attention to them, memorzing a few frets or section of the neck at a time.
#5
Yeah ive been using a chord dictionary for some time now and I can play just fine. But when it comes to anything theory , im like a deer in the headlights. I guess ill just have to start memorizing the notes on the neck. Thanks for the help. But for my final question a Gm is played like 355333. So how would you play a G#m? I just wanna know how for some song.
#6
thank you everyone for the helpful info.Ive been wanting to learn theory for some time now.
#8
G# is one semitone above G. A semitone is one fret, so G# is one fret above G, making it the fourth fret of the low E string.
#9
Quote by ryushu
Yeah ive been using a chord dictionary for some time now and I can play just fine. But when it comes to anything theory , im like a deer in the headlights. I guess ill just have to start memorizing the notes on the neck. Thanks for the help. But for my final question a Gm is played like 355333. So how would you play a G#m? I just wanna know how for some song.

Ok, well if you understand that 355333 is a G minor barre chord, the root of that chord is the first 3 (3rd fret on the low E string is the note G). Now when you memorize the notes on the neck, you'll see that up a half step to G# is just moving up one fret to the fourth fret on the low E string (4th fret low E string = the note G#). Since there are no open strings involved, meaning every string has a fretted note, you can move from a G minor barre chord to a G# minor barre chord by simply moving the whole chord shape (ie all of your fingers) up one fret. So now you'll be playing 466444 and you now have a G# minor barre chord.

When playing chords, regardless of which string the root is on, if there are NO open strings being played, you can sharp a chord by moving it up one fret or flat the chord by moving it down one fret.
#10
Quote by ryushu
Hello everyone. I am a self taught guitarist and was wonders how do I play sharps??

I dont know if that made any sense because im dumb when it comes to anything with theory. But for example , how would I play a G#m chord from a Gm chord or how would I play a C#m7 chord? Im confused and have searched but I might have missed it. Can someone point me the way or give me a link to a tutorial? Sorry if this has been posted already.

I don't wanna sound mean, but do you know the notes of the open strings?
#11
haha yeah i guess i sounded dumb. I didnt know how to explain it but I knew how to find the root note on the 5 and 6th string. What I misunderstood was the #'s that PSM cleared up completely. Thank you so much for the help.


im trying not to be annoying but, C#m7 Would i just move the C chord up a fret? But then how do I play the m7 part.

Or how about chords that are like C\E. Two chords like that make no sense to me either
Last edited by ryushu at Aug 15, 2008,
#12
The notes in the chord C#m7 are C# E G# B. The next chord you mention (C\E) is a C chord in the first inversion, which means it's a C chord with an E as the root note.