#1
im tyring to compose something in A harmonic minor

right now the chord prgressiong is going ii-i-vii. im using the 1-3-5 of each chord to come up with an arp line. its coming along, but i want to try something else after it.

i want to substitute the chrod progession out and possibly come up with something major sounding.

so it would be III (with a #5) then i dont know. can anyone help?
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#3
ehh im new to composing so i guess my termonology is off :roll eyes:

im trying to avoid C major because i use it so often. im trying to challenge myself and use keys/scales/chrods/arps that i wouldnt normally use.

its getting very aggrovating and it seems everytime I study my theory i get worse.
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#4
Quote by gonzaw
Hmm, you don't write something in harmonic minor, since it is a scale, not a key...

Major sounding? maybe change to C major


actually, it is. harmonic minor has it's own set of chords derived from it, hence it's a key.

to answer the question, a harmonic minor (a b c d e f g#), comprises of a minor, b diminished, c augmented, d minor, e major f major and g# diminished.

therefore, if you were looking for a major flavour, you would begin/resolve a section on e major.
#5
Well in A minor, your relative major is C, so if you want to follow ternary form, you really don't have much of a choice if you want to follow a typical style. However it's common to use other keys as well. Try modulation, if you don't know what that is, look up the lesson on it here, it's on the front page I believe.

If I remember correctly, harmonic minor is a scale, not a key. Modes have their own harmonies also, that doesn't make them keys, they're still modes. So do altered modes, they're still modes. It's common for people to approach and treat modes and scales as keys, but they're different from keys.
Last edited by one vision at Aug 18, 2008,
#6
Quote by one vision
Well in A minor, your relative major is C, so if you want to follow ternary form, you really don't have much of a choice if you want to follow a typical style. However it's common to use other keys as well. Try modulation, if you don't know what that is, look up the lesson on it here, it's on the front page I believe.


I have a question about modulation..
Can you modulate from A minor to F major just as you do from C major to F major?
#7
Quote by gonzaw
I have a question about modulation..
Can you modulate from A minor to F major just as you do from C major to F major?

Yup, here's an exerpt from the lesson, not my own words. (in b4 plagarism)

"Most modulations occur between closely related keys that differ by no more than one accidental in the key signature (this is where knowing key signatures and relative minors comes in). For example, if the original key is C Major, the closely related keys are G Major and F Major, and the relative minors of each of the three keys, A minor, E minor, and D minor. If you swap out and use A minor instead of C Major, the related keys are the same with the addition of C Major: E minor, D minor, C Major, G Major, and F Major. Remember, Major keys and their relative minor keys are in the same key signature as far accidentals go. If you notice, all of the related keys of C Major are diatonic to the key of C Major. In other words, the chords E minor, D minor, A minor, C Major, G Major, and F Major are all in the key of C Major. To be diatonic means in key."

Full lesson:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/modulation.html
#9
To me, it sounds complete without the G in there, just:
Am Dm C7 F.

I played it out a few times, and noticed that if you keep the G in there, you're moving more towards C major rather than F major, if you want to do that then do it, but if you want a quick path to F major, try Am Dm C7 F.

From F major, you could do some stuff with Bbmajor and again C7 (subdominant and dominant).

That's just how it sounds to me, and I seem to be following the rules, so it looks right.
#10
I thought you had to go through C major to go from Am to F....
But well, I guess that works...

We should make a game thread, like "name that chord" but instead make it "make that modulation" and we can make them figure the modulation between Fmin and C#major and stuff for instance (like the wikipedia game)...