#1
I REALLY need to know all the notes on the neck of my guitar.. the problem is i haven't really found a good method to use. For anyone out there who has learned all their notes, could please tell me how you did it and how long it took.
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#2
Learn where the 12 notes are on the E string. First.
It's much easier after that, because then it just repeats higher up on different strings.

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jthm_guitarist
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#3
I got a real good grasp of notes when I learned how to do octave runs. Octave runs is when you play a sequence of notes then you play the same notes an octave higher usually through 3 octaves.

For example, if you were to play the sequence F, G, G# on the low E string it would be on the 1st, 3rd, and 4th fret. To play it an octave higher, you would play it on the 3rd, 5th, and 6th fret on the D string. Then a last octave would be played on the 6th, 8th and 9th fret of the B string because it jumps one extra fret.

Do this and look at it over and over and try to imagine the guitar composed of 3 conveyor belts of notes and each belt is composed of 2 strings each (E and A for the first, D and G for the second and B and E for the third) with their starting points on different locations. Once I got this visualization in my head the notes were pretty simple to figure out at that point.
Last edited by LightxGrenade at Aug 15, 2008,
#4
1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
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#5
Quote by steven seagull
1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!






Don't confuse him, its easier to read like this

E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E

As you can see there is no E# or B#, ALWAYS remember that.
#6
How is that any less confusing? It's no different.
Actually called Mark!

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#7
Quote by steven seagull
How is that any less confusing? It's no different.



As I said before, It's easier to read when you refer to them as all sharps, rather than sharps and flats.
#9
Think of it if you were trying to learn the fretboard.

It's a lot easier for people to visualize all sharps then trying to comprehend both sharps and flats at the same time.

Also generally guitar pieces (at least the classical ones I play) generally sharps will be used more often then flats would.
#10
Learning the names of the open strings is easy, but memorizing all of the notes on the fretboard can be a long and difficult process. Here's a great warm up exercise to help you achieve that goal: Choose any note and play it once on each string (where it is located between the open string and the eleventh fret), from the low E to the high E and back down again. Start slowly at first, gradually increasing the tempo. Do this for a minute or so, then repeat the process an octave up (between frets 12 and 22). Do this every day (with a different note), and in no time you'll be able to locate any pitch on the guitar immediately -- truly an invaluable skill. This exercise is demonstrated below with the note A.

Repeat for a minute or so:

|-----------------------5-------------------------------|
|------------------10-------10--------------------------|
|--------------2-----------------2----------------------|
|----------7-------------------------7------------------|
|------0---------------------------------0--------------|
|--5----------------------------------------------------|


Repeat for a minute or so:
|---------------------------17--------------------------|
|----------------------22--------22---------------------|
|-----------------14------------------14----------------|
|------------19----------------------------19-----------|
|-------12--------------------------------------12------|
|--17---------------------------------------------------|
#11
Quote by jthm_guitarist
Learn where the 12 notes are on the E string. First.
It's much easier after that, because then it just repeats higher up on different strings.

Quote by LightxGrenade
I got a real good grasp of notes when I learned how to do octave runs. Octave runs is when you play a sequence of notes then you play the same notes an octave higher usually through 3 octaves.

For example, if you were to play the sequence F, G, G# on the low E string it would be on the 1st, 3rd, and 4th fret. To play it an octave higher, you would play it on the 3rd, 5th, and 6th fret on the D string. Then a last octave would be played on the 6th, 8th and 9th fret of the B string because it jumps one extra fret.

Do this and look at it over and over and try to imagine the guitar composed of 3 conveyor belts of notes and each belt is composed of 2 strings each (E and A for the first, D and G for the second and B and E for the third) with their starting points on different locations. Once I got this visualization in my head the notes were pretty simple to figure out at that point.



I'm gonna give both of these a try.

Thanks everyone
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#12
http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior//fretboard/fretboard.html

This tool might help a bit, will randomly pick a note on the fretboard and ask you to click which note it is. I've used it a bit.

In general tho...

1. learn open strings (EADGBe)
2. Learn notes on the E string (not sharps/flats, you just need to know A to G, then if you want A# you know its 1 fret farther than A!). Once you know E string you know 2/6 strings since its the same for high and low
3. Learn same notes on the A string. This will come because you play power chords on this string too.

4. harder but now you need to learn D and G strings. There is a trick though if you know your E and A strings. Make a power chord shape on the E string - now power chords are root-5th-root(octave) so guess what, whatever note you have on the E string, the same note can be found 2 frets away on the D string. Same relationship for A and G

5. B string.... you're on your own here don't know any tricks for it :p

And as mentioned only really worry about 1-12 frets, after that it repeats. And use the dots on your guitar for reference!
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#13
Also a nice thing that will help you if you know the notes of the E and A string.
Imagine a powerchord. So let's say that you want to know what note the 6th fret on the D string is. So you do a powerchord form with the hands, and put the pinky on the 6th fret on the D string. Now check where's your index finger. It will be in the 4th fret of the E string.
Since they are the same note on different octaves, you will know that it's a G#.

Basically:
D|----G#----|                        D|----6----|
A|----D#----|          =            A|----6----|
E|----G#----|                        E|----4----|



Understand?
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Last edited by urik at Aug 15, 2008,