#1
I picked up a Jackson with a Floyd Rose on it about a week ago from Guitar Center. This is my first guitar that has ever had a Floyd Rose on it, so I need someone to tell me if this is a common problem. I just got used to tuning it, and put it in drop c. When I was finished tuning, I noticed when I palm mute it would make a high pitched noise similar to a harmonic. Upon further inspection, the tremelo was not floating anymore! It seems as though my bridge is stuck to the guitar now, and it wont float. I would like to know if this is a common problem or not, because I have only had the guitar for a week, and it is very irritating. Thanks.
#3
You have to adjust the spring tension in the back.
Quote by mrvile

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#4
you can't really do drop C with the standard strings they give you
Quote by archerygenious
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#5
Yup, it's a common problem.


By tuning down, the tension of the strings was reduced to the point where the spring tension pulls the bridge all the way into the cavity.

To correct this, you must reduce the spring tension to compensate for the slacker strings.

This is done by turning the two big screws inside the trem cavity which hold the metal plate (or claw) to which the springs are attached. Carefully unscrew them a little and retune.

If necessary take out a spring (make sure there are at least two springs left over).

The process of slightly unscrewing and retuning should get your bridge flush with the surface of the body again.


In the event that you have removed all but the last two springs and you feel like unscrewing the claw further might result in the screws being ripped out when you do a divebomb, but the bridge still isn't flush, move up to a higher string gauge.


Good luck.
You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#6
the only floating tremolo that you can really tune down with is an ibanez ZR, even if you break a string on it, it wont go out of tune, for your though, the only real option is heavier strings.
#7
I just got a new Cort X-2 and the strings sound like crap in C tuning, and they're nowhere close to being able to support drop Bb. I would buy new strings, probably the heaviest gauge you can get, and you'll get survivability plus low tunings. I don't know about your tremolo bridge, but that sounds pretty bad...
#8
Quote by Nuclearbomb8900
I just got a new Cort X-2 and the strings sound like crap in C tuning, and they're nowhere close to being able to support drop Bb. I would buy new strings, probably the heaviest gauge you can get, and you'll get survivability plus low tunings. I don't know about your tremolo bridge, but that sounds pretty bad...



just get a 7 string set and tune the low B down if you want Bb
Last edited by grifff at Aug 15, 2008,
#9
Quote by Bonsaischaap
Yup, it's a common problem.


By tuning down, the tension of the strings was reduced to the point where the spring tension pulls the bridge all the way into the cavity.

To correct this, you must reduce the spring tension to compensate for the slacker strings.

This is done by turning the two big screws inside the trem cavity which hold the metal plate (or claw) to which the springs are attached. Carefully unscrew them a little and retune.

If necessary take out a spring (make sure there are at least two springs left over).

The process of slightly unscrewing and retuning should get your bridge flush with the surface of the body again.


In the event that you have removed all but the last two springs and you feel like unscrewing the claw further might result in the screws being ripped out when you do a divebomb, but the bridge still isn't flush, move up to a higher string gauge.


Good luck.


+1000... He's 100% right


the only floating tremolo that you can really tune down with is an ibanez ZR, even if you break a string on it, it wont go out of tune, for your though, the only real option is heavier strings.


Not True...
#10
Quote by creativlogic
+1000... He's 100% right



You've read it, you can't un-read it!
#11
The stock strings are usually .009-.042 which are mainly for the standard tuning. It's no surprise that your bridge dropped into its cavity. The reason is that the string tension is far less than the spring tension, so to facilitate that tuning, you should use heavier gauge strings like .011-.056. Put a battery or a pencil (or anything to keep the bridge at it's correct angle) to make sure that the bridge stays in place and install the new strings. Once you're in tune, lock the nut, and remove the battery (or pencil). If the bridge remains in place, you're good to go; if not then tighten or loosen it's screws according to the angle. Good luck.