#1
I use a metronome for my scales and warm-up excercises without a problem, and have developed a much better sense of timing and rhythmm because of it. But its only recently I decided I'd try and use the metronome while doing some soloing...

It seems incredibly difficult because not only do I have to use 8th notes and 16th notes back and forth, I still have to play the solo correctly, bends, pull offs, etc. I can't count very well in my head IE 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and...for 8th notes and 1 e and a for 16th notes and play the solo AND make sure I'm on beat, tap my foot etc...

It feels like my brain will explode. I've tried going very very slowly but still the same problem. This certainly takes all the fun and enjoyment I get from playing the guitar away...and it's very frustrating. Any advice?
#3
Well, I'd love not too, but from what I've read it seems you'll die a horrible death and burn in hell if you don't use a metronome...all the time....everytime.
#4
Quote by Lumdiyen
Well, I'd love not too, but from what I've read it seems you'll die a horrible death and burn in hell if you don't use a metronome...all the time....everytime.


Thats awesome.

I don't know what to say besides go extremely slow. Or speed it up to a point where you get the gist of what you're playing and then slow it down from there.
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#5
Yeah,

Well, I've gone as slow as 60 BPM trying to do that, but I still can't keep track in my head, I guess the main problem is the counting and trying to hear the click, and hearing the solo as well, confuses the heck out of me...

That and switching from 8th to 16th...Argh.
#6
I'm actually working on a lesson right now regarding metronome use, so keep an eye out for it. One suggestion I have if you're having difficulty counting is to try and double the tempo of the click so that you don't have to count or "hear" the eighth notes in your head. For example, if you slow down to 60 bpm and can play it at that but are having trouble keeping track of the beat, set the metronome to 120 bpm so that it's clicking the quarter notes AND the eighth notes and you don't have to focus so much on counting or hearing it in your head and you can just focus on playing the solo correctly.
#7
Quote by PSM
I'm actually working on a lesson right now regarding metronome use, so keep an eye out for it. One suggestion I have if you're having difficulty counting is to try and double the tempo of the click so that you don't have to count or "hear" the eighth notes in your head. For example, if you slow down to 60 bpm and can play it at that but are having trouble keeping track of the beat, set the metronome to 120 bpm so that it's clicking the quarter notes AND the eighth notes and you don't have to focus so much on counting or hearing it in your head and you can just focus on playing the solo correctly.



Hey,

Thanks, I appreciate that advice. I'll try it, right now though, it still takes the fun out of it.

I guess I can't get away with simple metronome excerices to develop a sense of time and then play a solo without a metronome using that developed sense? I seem to keep good time, not PERFECT I imagine, but pretty good....

Using the metronome for that really spoils it for me. And I like to take a solo and not play it like the record but slow down certain parts and kinda...switch it up, give it a much different feel. Kinda hard to do that with a metronome going in the background, because a lot of it is improvised.
#8
honestly, I don't use a metronome for solos. It is too hard for me. I find when I just try to feel the music I play more accurately anyway.
#9
Quote by Crazygoalie2002
honestly, I don't use a metronome for solos. It is too hard for me. I find when I just try to feel the music I play more accurately anyway.


Yeah, it seems I do too. But I don't want to get into bad habits on not knowing how to incorporate a metronome to those things.

I guess I'll do some more metronome excerices that really make you count those 16th notes and 8th notes out and see if that helps...hopefully it will?

In the mean time I'll probably just try and keep time myself when playing other things.
#11
Quote by CircuitTrigger
dont use a metro, just use some kind of drum track, it will make counting a little easier


Hate to say it, but I'm unfamilar how to follow along to the drums. I know people say its just like a metronome, but it a bit confusing to me.

I might have to wait to hook up with a drummer sometime, to learn that. =/
#12
try,to slow down a bit lower the BPM on the metronome and try it sloooowwlly
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#13
Making up solos? Or playing other peoples? If you're playing other people's solos try using guitarpro and see if it helps. Or Tuxguitar/powertab, whatever. From what I've heard, many people don't count in there head when they are writing music. But if you NEED to, try putting the solo in one of those guitar programs and see if it helps.
#14
Instead of using a boring old metronome, how about some backing drums? Just find a backing track or make one with a cheap drum machine. Even better, play along to the song you're trying to do.
#15
Quote by Ze_Metal
Making up solos? Or playing other peoples? If you're playing other people's solos try using guitarpro and see if it helps. Or Tuxguitar/powertab, whatever. From what I've heard, many people don't count in there head when they are writing music. But if you NEED to, try putting the solo in one of those guitar programs and see if it helps.



Well, a little of both. I rarely play other peoples solos as they do. I like to change it. Slow down certain parts, speed up others...give it a different feel, and improvise around it... Otherwise I'd probably be hearing the exact solo in my head and could play it at that rhythmm, like I do with riffs.
#16
Quote by Vixus
Instead of using a boring old metronome, how about some backing drums? Just find a backing track or make one with a cheap drum machine. Even better, play along to the song you're trying to do.



Yeah, but like I said I don't know how to follow along with a drum track, I know its probably the same thing as a metronome, perhaps easier from what I hear...but It seems confusing to me.

Do you happen to know a site with free drum tracks, and I might give it a shot?
#17
I know how you feel... My first instrument is Cornet, and I started playing it in a brass band.
When I first started, I was completley confused.
You see, the thing the bands conducter (also my teacher) always said was, "I dont care if ALL the notes are wrong, if the timing is right.".
After a while, you just get used to it...
Hope that helps.
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#18
Quote by Benjabenja
I know how you feel... My first instrument is Cornet, and I started playing it in a brass band.
When I first started, I was completley confused.
You see, the thing the bands conducter (also my teacher) always said was, "I dont care if ALL the notes are wrong, if the timing is right.".
After a while, you just get used to it...
Hope that helps.



Yeah, so you think that some of this stuff just comes from practicing with a band, and is hard to learn if you just play by yourself? Thats kind of the impression I'm getting after reading about this stuff.
#19
Quote by Lumdiyen
Yeah, so you think that some of this stuff just comes from practicing with a band, and is hard to learn if you just play by yourself? Thats kind of the impression I'm getting after reading about this stuff.


Not really, it's just a thing that some people can get awesome timing even without a metronome by just using their ears. Some people need a metronome and eventually they'll be able to keep awesome time. Just natural aptitude I guess, keep at it. Everything gets easier after a certain amount of time. A garage band can actually make your timing worse if the drummer is a novice.
#20
Quote by Ze_Metal
Not really, it's just a thing that some people can get awesome timing even without a metronome by just using their ears. Some people need a metronome and eventually they'll be able to keep awesome time. Just natural aptitude I guess, keep at it. Everything gets easier after a certain amount of time. A garage band can actually make your timing worse if the drummer is a novice.



Thanks, my timing seems good, I've even recorded myself and really tried to tell if I was off and it sounded like I was on....but I'm a perfectionist and haunted by the idea of not being on time and just simply not being able to tell with my ear.

I know the metronome excerices really helped my timing and it SEEMS to translate when I try and keep good time without it....hmm.
#21
Quote by Lumdiyen
Yeah, so you think that some of this stuff just comes from practicing with a band, and is hard to learn if you just play by yourself? Thats kind of the impression I'm getting after reading about this stuff.

I think being in a band does help alot, but it's not essential.

Try finding a very easy solo, a lot easier than your level, and playing it with a metronome perfectly, concentrating on the timing and how it all fits together, rather than the notes.
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You sir, are a genius.

I salute you.

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The bestowing of this thread on my life is yours. Thank you, Benjabenja.