#1
Okay I'm currently trying to learn the basics of theory. I learned to read music, which I feel is already a big step. But now that I've learned the very basics, I'm moving on to scales.

I already read a lot on them, and I learned the basics for them aswell, but there's still one thing I do not quite understand, if I can say. I actually do understand scales, their roles and all that, but I can't seem to really learn them. What I mean is, I can for example, take a scale. For this example, C major, just for it's simplicity.

So our scale is C D E F G A B, which I can transpose to my fretboard, but then what? Like, what do you basicly have to practice when learning scales? I'm clearly aware of the box of major scales, but that's not learning a scale, and I'm aware.

I have a currently very limited knowledge of scales, like I know how the major scale is built(WWHWWWH), but that's far from being enough to know a scale. I need to know what to learn about a scale, what to practice. Basicly, how do you "learn" a scale? Do you just practice the box pattern up and down? Cause that seems pretty restricting. What do you need to be able to say you KNOW a scale?

Thanks for the help. By the way I have started to learn the lessons on http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_forum/index.php?showtopic=3351 . I highly recommend it to anyone who's trying to start out their knowledge of theory. I basicly knew nothing and I couldn't find any REAL beginner's lessons on UG. Not that they are bad, they did help me, but the stuff on here requires a bit of knowledge to understand. Don't know who posted this url but thanks, it was REALLY helpful.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#2
Quote by Spike6sic6

What do you need to be able to say you KNOW a scale?


There's many many interesting ideas you can get out of scales that can be used
as musical phrases, or components of musical phrases, or structures of musical
phrases. The trick is to practice organizing the scale in these different ways so
that you can begin using them without much thought. When you can "view" a
scale from all these different "angles", you begin to get to know it.

So what does organizing in different ways mean? If you go up and down the
scale linearly, that's in intervals of 2nds. You probably know that one. You
can also do similar in 3rds, 4ths, 5ths, 6ths and 7ths. You can do those in every
neck position and in a variety of rhthms and patterns. That's just a few simple
examples of intervals. There's arpeggio's and all kinds of other stuff.

This is really what a book of "scale studies" teaches. Best one I've found for the
guitar is "Sheets of Sound" by Jack Zucker.
#3
I'm still having a hard time grasping WHAT to practice to learn a scale.

For example the minor pentatonic... Should I start playing around the first box until I know it, then do the same with box 2. For example if I learn box 1 and 2 of the G minor pentatonic and play around with those notes by moving from a box to the other, and then repeat with other box, is that a good way of learning?

Then after practicing minor pentatonic(all boxes, in multiple keys, fiddling around, moving up and down the neck), I'd move on to major pentatonics. Does that sound like a good way of really learning a scale? I'm having a hard time grasping the principe of "learning a scale".

Basicly, what do I do when I learn a scale?
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#4
A scale is simply a collection of notes that have been found to convey a certain idea or emotion well.
#5
Quote by The_Sophist
A scale is simply a collection of notes that have been found to convey a certain idea or emotion well.


Of course, I know what a scale is. Did you even bother reading my posts?

All I wanna know is how do I practice them. Everywhere I see people say "Oh I learned that scale, I know this one, etc". Okay, I understand the patterns and all that, but how the hell do I train them? How do I get to being able to say "I know that scale"?
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#6
That is exactly what I don't get either
Quote by razorback91
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Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#7
What helped me was playing the notes of the scale on two strings at a time, up and down the neck. Then move to the next two, then the next two. So you'd start with E and A, then A and D, then D and G, etc etc. Practicing this really helped me get scales under my fingers.
#9
you learn scales so you can play notes that sound harmonious together (e.g. soloing)
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