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#1
Am I the only who doesnt have a clue about guitar and musical theory.I look at it ont the internet and have no ******* clue what the hell im looking at.
Budget for new equipment:34 $
Total cost:1000



Devoted follower of Zeppelinism
#5
theory = to technicall!!!!!
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Alternatively, have your friends hold him down, then take a dump in his mouth, make sure your genitals don't touch him though, that's gay.

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Teddy-Metal
for those who like to mosh, but just wanna cuddle afterwards

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#8
You don't need theory
i mean.. the greatest guitarists ever didn't use it
slash keeps it tr00 when he says FUCK THEORY.


/sarcasm
#10
3 things:
1) If you have no clue about guitar then why are you in this forum?
2) If you do play guitar, then you already know some basic theory, such as intervals, or the notes in the music alphabet.
3) I suggest you get a guitar teacher who can help you with music theory. He will also be able to show the correct hand techniques and such so that you wont develop any bad habits early on.
#12
i understand some stuff but like the real advanced stuff I dont get.
Budget for new equipment:34 $
Total cost:1000



Devoted follower of Zeppelinism
#13
Yes thank you.
Budget for new equipment:34 $
Total cost:1000



Devoted follower of Zeppelinism
#15
Quote by Kick2theOvaries
You don't need theory
i mean.. the greatest guitarists ever didn't use it
slash keeps it tr00 when he says FUCK THEORY.


/sarcasm
d00d, liek, evrybudy uses thory evne witout knwing, lulz. Cus thory iz jst describes music and wut sunds gud lulz
#16
Quote by MV4824
This is just my opinion.. but I believe that it limits you with scales, modes and boundaries. I know a good bit of theory.. but I feel that I'll turn into something I'm not if I learn more.

Just a thought of mine.
Trust me, as long as you dont try to focus on being "theoreticallly correct" than your fine.
#17
Quote by MV4824
This is just my opinion.. but I believe that it limits you with scales, modes and boundaries. I know a good bit of theory.. but I feel that I'll turn into something I'm not if I learn more.

Just a thought of mine.

But it doesn't make sense to me. That's like saying that not learning language would have allowed classic authors to carve more unique styles. If you know how certain scales and harmonies work together, you actually open the door to create a more unique sound.
#18
Quote by :-D
But it doesn't make sense to me. That's like saying that not learning language would have allowed classic authors to carve more unique styles. If you know how certain scales and harmonies work together, you actually open the door to create a more unique sound.
Could you argue that shakespear was illiterate because he made every 10th word up? Or that some lines dont make grammatical sense (even for archaic english)?

It's the same with music.

BTW, I said that in agreeance
#20
Quote by brooklynsoulja1
theory = to technicall!!!!!



Anyone else find it funny that someone who claims they don't know theory used the wrong too?
#22
Quote by MV4824
XD

I can read music and play several instruments.. but I'm still confused by it.

I like the idea of not knowing too much about it, it could corrupt your uniqueness.

Or it could expand your musical awareness, deepen your understanding of music, allow you new ways to think about and discuss musical ideas, and free you to be even more innovative and unique than you could ever have been without it?
Si
#23
Quote by MV4824
XD

I can read music and play several instruments.. but I'm still confused by it.

I like the idea of not knowing too much about it, it could corrupt your uniqueness.


Que?

Music theory does not corrupt! It helps to construct better music. With theory I have been able to make compositions flow better when I have written them down. I now know what sounds good and why and what sounds bad and why. Im 100% sure that without the theory knowledge I have gained, I would be an even worse guitar player than I am now. Even my improvisation has improved due to my theory knowledge. To say it corrupts uniqueness is just... Silly! Theory is a tool, and the more tools you have under your belt, the eaiser it is to construct your music.

---

To the threadstarter, I can reccommend you some books to get hold of that can help you understand theory better. Try and get hold of the AB guide to music theory part one and two. I also got the exercise books and worked through them, which helped the theory "click" better in my mind. I also had the luxury of a teacher. Teachers are an invaluable source of theory.

Also, a few books I am reading at the moment are:

Jazzology by Robert Warlins (Brilliant book, has excercises and answers in there)
Jazz theory for guitarists by Mark Levine
First year harmony by William Lovelock (Dont know if its still being published though...)
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#24
People believe music theory makes you less creative because they don't fully understand it. They stick to the same box patterns and such and say it's limiting, really? No ****, doing the same thing over and over is limiting? I'm flabbergasted.
#25
Dude, i really doubt that every person who doesn't learn theory is going to be great. Shakespeare was a complete genius and you focused his life into writing. For the rest of us, we need theory.
Last edited by ♣LakeBodom♣ at Aug 17, 2008,
#26
Quote by MV4824
This is just my opinion.. but I believe that it limits you with scales, modes and boundaries. I know a good bit of theory.. but I feel that I'll turn into something I'm not if I learn more.

Just a thought of mine.


I'm pretty sure that is not the point of music theory.

An excerpt of "Harmony" a book I am reading right now by Walter Piston:

Introduction:

"The first important step in the study of harmony is that of clarifying the purpose of such study. Much confusion exists today as to why we study musical theory and what we should expect to learn from it. In the present writer's teaching experience this confusion of outlook furnishes the commonest and more serious obstacle to progress in all branches of musical theory.

There are those who consider that studies in harmony, counterpoint, and fugue are the exclusive province of the intended composer. But if we reflect that theory must follow practice, rarely preceding it except by change, we must realize that musical theory is not a set of directions for composing music. It Is rather the collected and systematized deductions gathered by observing the practice of composers over a long time, and it attempts to set forth what is or has been their common practice. It tells not how music will be written in the future, but how music has been written in the past."

of course there is more, if you want me to type it up I can. What you are implying/saying that theory is a guideline to writing music. Or at least that is what it sounds like.
Last edited by Nacho Cheese! at Aug 17, 2008,
#27
I'm glad I'm taking theory this year in High School, this is something I really would like to learn and UG's lessons only can do so much.

I must admit though, I understand a good amount of it so far from UG....
Quote by Teh Forest King
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#28
Quote by MV4824
This is just my opinion.. but I believe that it limits you with scales, modes and boundaries. I know a good bit of theory.. but I feel that I'll turn into something I'm not if I learn more.

Just a thought of mine.


I can kinda understand... When I used to write, I had no clue of scales, intervals, any basic stuff. Most of it, looking back, is crap. Now, after learning, most every song I write is good. Although the few good songs I wrote would have all these weird theory stuff in it, like key modulations, and they would sound right cool. I know there is a theory behind how I did all of it, but now I don't think I could do it.

Not trying to start an argument, though. Just a thought.
#29
Quote by The_Sophist
People believe music theory makes you less creative because they don't fully understand it. They stick to the same box patterns and such and say it's limiting, really? No ****, doing the same thing over and over is limiting? I'm flabbergasted.


People believe that composers compose songs completely out of music theory.. meaning they put no soul into it and have no inspiration and stuff, its retarded.
#30
Quote by MV4824
This is just my opinion.. but I believe that it limits you with scales, modes and boundaries. I know a good bit of theory.. but I feel that I'll turn into something I'm not if I learn more.

Just a thought of mine.

No, the only thing that can limit you is a lack of imagination. If you look at music by famous composers such as Beethoven or Bach, it mostly follows what's considered to be standard theory. Is it limited? Hell no. If you say to yourself, "I can only play in the major scale relating to this key!" then you'll make boring music. You can make your music much better with a knowledge of theory, provided you've got the imagination.
#31
Quote by MV4824
This is just my opinion.. but I believe that it limits you with scales, modes and boundaries. I know a good bit of theory.. but I feel that I'll turn into something I'm not if I learn more.
This is a foolish and dangerous mindset; ignore any posts paralleling this idea.

As for the original question, try my sig. It will look like Greek at first, but when you read through it slowly like you would read dense math or science text, it will make sense. Please do ask us any questions you have, but ask an actual question: no "I don't get it" posts, please.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Aug 18, 2008,
#32
Quote by bangoodcharlote
This is a foolish and dangerous mindset; ignore any posts paralleling this idea.

As for the original question, try my sig. It will look like Greek at first, but when you read through it slowly like you would read dense math or science text, it will make sense. Please do ask us any questions you have, but ask an actual question: no "I don't get it" posts, please.


At least you made the link bigger now

I would find that using pictures more often in those lessons would make people more interested into reading said lessons..
If you don't have pictures, etc, you would tell people to read a huge wall of text, which not a lot of people are fond to.
BY displaying images you grab the reader's attention, you mark the concepts more and how they are outlined (if you see scales written in sheet music you know the lesson isn't talking about chords) since images are paid more attention than text usually, and it would help people visualize the concepts better....
#33
www.musictheory.net is a great little site to start on. Lots of info ranging from basic to fairly complex.


I would recommend staying away from jazz theory for now seeing that if you don't understand basic harmony you aren't going to understand the harmony used in jazz.
#34
when i first started playing guitar - the basic chords, minor pentatonic - i was dead set against theory, did not want to learn it. thought it was evil and dangerous, it strangled and suffocated you etc. etc.

then someone wrote down the notes of c major and i stayed up all night figuring out the other 23 keys for myself. go figure...

as i result, i would compare learning music theory to using the brake properly in a car, or using an instruction manual when assembling a bookcase; you could try it yourself, there's a tiny probability that you'll reach the same goal by pure fluke, but if you know how to use it properly/know what to do, you'll get there that much faster.
#35
Not learning theory and trying to write music is like not using toilet paper, messy and unpleasant for yourself and anyone around.
#37
Quote by The_Sophist
Not learning theory and trying to write music is like not using toilet paper, messy and unpleasant for yourself and anyone around.


Not if you have ears and a brain.
shred is gaudy music
#38
Not if you have ears and a brain.



this. I know people with very little theory knowledge yet they've played for so long that they have learnt to listen to themselves and their playing. Guess what? Sounds great. Maybe they don't know what they're playing is phrygian, but they know it sounds the way they want it to.

Theory shouldn't be a must or a must not. It should be an "I'm here and I'm not going to go away any time soon so if you want to check me out to learn how things work come on over".
#40
Quote by gonzaw
Of course..
Someone had to figure out music theory in the first place right?


yep, but even before that, someone had to play music.

1st music developed..... then music theory.
shred is gaudy music
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