#1
im not sure where to put this but

I'm in a band and our singer doesn't really warm up before practices or shows, because he doesn't know what he should do. Do any of you know what he should do to warm up?
#2
On a Metallica DVD I watched, James Hetfield just did like "uh-Uh-UH-UHHH" in from low to high like a lot of times.

It depends, I'm sure that a lot of famous and decent singers don't warm up. The last Kurt Cobain prolly did was warm up his vocals.

If your singer's a screamer though, it's important to warm up his voice though, so he doesn't hurt anything.


Favourite bands
The Offspring
Nirvana
Blink 182
Circa Survive
Boxcar Racer
AFI
The Beatles
and others.

Guitars
Epiphone Les Paul 100 (black and gold)
w/ Marshall MG10kk Kerry King amp
Alvarez Classical guitar
#4
Depending on what you sing, you may not need warmups.

For example, when I scream, I don't warm up, but that's because I know how to do it right and it doesn't hurt me if I don't.

Punk singing might require warm-ups. Define punk singing? The Offspring, or Blink-182, they would, because they hit some odd notes, but NOFX and Guttermouth and those sort of punk bands probably wouldn't.

Like I said, it depends. If you're singing a baritone rock song, you probably wouldn't need to big a warm up. But singing Elton John means knowing how to use falsetto, vibrato, and vocal tricks like that. I've played Rocket Man live, and that's far more challenging than, say, Foo Fighters or something like that.

Google 'vocal scales'.
Ascending 'la's' should do the trick.
#5
It's basicaly a case of going through the different notes that he's gonna use (from one end of his vocal range to the other) starting off fairly quietly and gradualy building up in volume until he's singing at the same volume that he would on stage.
This is especialy important if your singer is normaly quietly spoken because he's going to be taking his vocal chords to a whole different place than what they are normaly used to.
Myself, I'm a partialy deaf loudmouth, which means that there isn't actualy that much difference between my talking volume and my singing volume so I probably wouldn't need quite as much warmup as a quietly spoken vocalist would.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 17, 2008,
#6
Hopefully the mods will merge this with the 'only singing thread.'

Nonetheless... I don't really have a 'warm up' per se. (to put it in perspective for those that don't know.... I've studied voice for ten years and have been the lead singer in the bands I've been in for about the last 6 years - I teach singing, and the link in my sig is my vocal site)

I'm not suggesting for a second that you don't need to warm up though. It's just that I don't have a warm up. I'll usually sing in the car on my way to a gig, which warms my voice up just fine. Starting with simple stuff in the middle of my range and progressing towards the lower and higher notes is good, sound practice - just like you would in any other vocal exercises in a lesson.

Another thing that I do is make sure that I don't start off with any songs that will be really taxing on my voice. We did a show last night. Our first song was one that started with a verse that used notes in the range of what I would call 'upper mids' of my voice. The pre-chorus was primarily notes in the same range. By the time I got to the chorus, I was good to go.

Funny.... as I was typing this, I realized the way I warm up for guitar is pretty much the same.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Normally I just sing along to Soundgarden songs. Superunknown is the hardest song.
Quote by HuckIt
I didn't find it that funny when I saw myself doing him in missionary position...

Quote by Oblivion_Rps
I was having sex with a female dolphin. In the dream I was like:
"YEEEEEEEAAAARGH I'M SCREWIN' A FEMALE DOLPHIN!!!" and when I woke up I was like:
"... wtf"
#8
Our punk is more like Sum 41, New Found Glory, Offspring stuff.

Our singer sings pretty high up at times, i wanna say sorta like offspring range, but not all the time. which makes me wonder if he's straining his voice if he doesn't warm up properly.
#9
For vocal warmups...

Do humming on a 5 note scale (1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2 1), low down and high, but don't strain anything. Put your tongue on the back of your bottom row of teeth (like when you say "he") and if you're doing it correctly, you should get a vibrating tickly feeling.

You can also do things like singing 'gug' and 'gee' instead of humming,as well as "sirening" which is when you make an 'ng' sound. This slightly raises the soft palate, making an open sound. You could also change the scale to an ocatave arpeggio (1 3 5 8 5 3 1).

It's basically playing about with scales, up and down a keyboard, getting your whole face warmed up
#10
Quote by axemanchris
Hopefully the mods will merge this with the 'only singing thread.'

Nonetheless... I don't really have a 'warm up' per se. (to put it in perspective for those that don't know.... I've studied voice for ten years and have been the lead singer in the bands I've been in for about the last 6 years - I teach singing, and the link in my sig is my vocal site)

I'm not suggesting for a second that you don't need to warm up though. It's just that I don't have a warm up. I'll usually sing in the car on my way to a gig, which warms my voice up just fine. Starting with simple stuff in the middle of my range and progressing towards the lower and higher notes is good, sound practice - just like you would in any other vocal exercises in a lesson.

Another thing that I do is make sure that I don't start off with any songs that will be really taxing on my voice. We did a show last night. Our first song was one that started with a verse that used notes in the range of what I would call 'upper mids' of my voice. The pre-chorus was primarily notes in the same range. By the time I got to the chorus, I was good to go.

Funny.... as I was typing this, I realized the way I warm up for guitar is pretty much the same.

CT

I'm pretty much the same myself Chris. I don't have a warm up generaly, I occasionaly sing in the car on the way to the gig, or sing backstage if I feel my voice could do with it, but usualy, just the fact that I'm with my buddies and the fact that we generaly become louder and louder the longer we're together generaly warms my voice up anyway, and like you, I also pick songs that actualy start you off with an easy vocal scale to sing, then put something slightly harder in the set, so that the first few songs actualy act as a voice warm up for the rest of the gig.
For this reason (and because it's also the perfect song to add atmosphere to the beginning of a Sabbath tribute gig) we always start with 'Black Sabbath' which has that slow, almost talking level of singing most of the way through it until it picks up towards the end. Then we go straight into 'Fairies Wear Boots' which raises the level just a little more, then a little bit more again for the choruses, then a tiny bit more again for the shouted part 'All right now.' Together, these two songs make a perfect warm up exercise for the rest of the night and by the time we've reached the end of 'Fairies Wear Boots' I'm all warmed up and ready for anything.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 18, 2008,
#12
You play some scales on guitar and the singer has to sing those notes a few times. That's what I did, only using a piano.
Wą.
#13
You always need a warmup of some sort. Even if it's like Axemanchris's or Slacker's. I sing in international choirs. And we always warm up. Not only to warm up your vocal range, but to help you get into the groove of your voice. I've found that when i'm playing a show with my band, and i haven't warmed up, I'll get onstage and my voice doesn't find the notes or hold them as well. This is because i haven't settled into my voice and that's part of the purpose of a warmup.
#14
i find if you have a really warm shower before hand really helps or breathe in steam
Sigs Are For Pussies
#15
A shot of vodka is helpful too. No, srsly, we did that with a choir before a show.
Wą.
#16
Quote by assmanchris
I'll usually sing in the car on my way to a gig, which warms my voice up just fine. Starting with simple stuff in the middle of my range and progressing towards the lower and higher notes is good, sound practice - just like you would in any other vocal exercises in a lesson.

Funny.... as I was typing this, I realized the way I warm up for guitar is pretty much the same.

CT


You play guitar while you're driving?
Guitars: Fender Highway one -08, Epiphone SG, Walden acoustic and two parlour-acoustics from the early 30's
Amps: Fender -65 Deluxe Reverb, Marshall Valvestate 8240, Peavey Rage and one unknown one, hehe...
Pedals: Dunlop Fuzzface, Original Crybaby
Last edited by FiliphSlim at Aug 17, 2008,
#17
Yeah, I operate the pedals and my wife steers.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
Quote by axemanchris
Yeah, I operate the pedals and my wife steers.

CT

There's a gag in there somewhere about a gear-shift stick, but I'd better just leave it be.

Quote by grwr
A shot of vodka is helpful too. No, srsly, we did that with a choir before a show.

Port is better. Opera singers occasionaly gargle with it as it acts like a pain killer and anesthetic on a sore throat, but this is not really recommended as you can damage your throat further, sometimes perminantly, when singing without a pain threshold.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 18, 2008,
#19
The once great opera singer Caruso used to gargle with ether before singing. Ultimately, his career was cut short due his throat hemorrhaging on stage.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
Quote by axemanchris
The once great opera singer Caruso used to gargle with ether before singing. Ultimately, his career was cut short due his throat hemorrhaging on stage.

CT


Ouch!

and,

ETHER??? Jeeeezus! The guy must have been completely sh!t-faced on stage.

Now that's Rock 'n' Roll!
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 19, 2008,
#21
Hehe... things NOT to do before singing!



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
Quote by axemanchris
Hehe... things NOT to do before singing!



CT


There used to be a biker band in the late eighties called The Boyz led by singer 'Dirty Dan Buck' who had a real raspy, screechy voice, kinda like Dan McCafferty from Nazareth (go check 'em out kiddies, especialy an album called 'No Mean City') but more over the top.
Their album sleeve claimed that he 'gargled with listerine laced with portions of shattered car windscreen.'

Possibly a 'promotional exaggeration' (outright lie) but he actualy sounded like he might just have done.


On a related topic, gargling with salt water is very good for a throat infection and will speed up your recovery, and will also act as an anesthetic on a sore throat, but, again, is not a recommended thing to do before a gig because of the damage singing with an anesthetised throat can do.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Aug 19, 2008,