#1
Hello
So I can go up and down scales. I've been able to hit 170 - 180 bpm sixteenth notes on the various scales, though it takes me 20 minutes to warm up enough to do them. Sometimes they don't come out right, but this is my max... not my comfortable speed. I can do 130 bpm on arpeggio's as well comfortably if that helps. I've only been playing for 1.5 to possibly 2 years, and I have really **** equipment... but that doesn't matter.
I'm self taught. I'm pretty sure I'm doing fine because stuff comes out usually properly. I'm an individual with the desire to learn hugely. I've taught myself tons of theory (thanks to this site), but now I'm sort of stuck.

I want to be able to solo like this guy:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Rasite
He does Bodom and Wintersun solos... and has been only playing 4 years!


If you could go back in time, what would you do to make yourself work? I can't just practice scales all my life. Should I be trying band solos? I usually put in 2 hours of guitar a day... and I don't know where to go from here. Obviously I'll be doing my scales all day, but how to I learn to solo like that? Is it just repetition? I don't expect to make a godlike solo anytime soon...
Also a tutor is out of the question at this point. I know it would be best, but that will come later when I actually get a job after this brutal year at university.

Any help would be appreciated immensely.

Personal experiences also desired
: )
#2
I've seen him too...and subscribed, he's awesome.
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#3
He's probably my favorite you-tube guitarist. An incredibly talented dude.

As for how to get that good, well, he kicks my butt, but I can give you some tips.

First of all, you've got to diversify your practice routine a bit. Scales are great and an important part of your routine, but not enough by themselves. Split your time between the following:
1) technique work (scales, chromatics, LH-RH sync exercises, finger independance exercises, alternate picking exercises, and some sweeping stuff) - see the exercises thread on this forum for that.
2) Improvising/composing.
3) Learning songs, solos, licks, fragments, from others.
4) Rhythm. I can't stress this enough! There's no point being a great lead player if your rhythm sucks!
5) Theory and ear training.

You probably can't do this in one session, so focus on different aspects per session, and keep looping around. The different kinds of practice will feed each other.

That's an idea of what to practice, now some thoughts on how to practice.

Quality practice is practice where you are totally focused on what you are doing. For example, noodling in front of the tv is not quality practice. You must be totally concentrated on what you are doing. Pay attention to every note you are playing. If you are comfortable enough moving around the fretboard, spend some of the time with your eyes closed. It's amazing how much more connected to the music you are with one sense shut off.
Pursue quality of playing before speed. For example, a goal of playing a lick or exercise 10 times in a row at a moderate speed without a single mistake is more beneficial to your playing than a goal of beating your max by 10bpm. Only increase speed when you have something totally down at your current speed. 2-5bpm increments are good. Be patient with this, the speed will come by itself as your technique improves.
Play everything you practice at multiple tempos starting extremely slow, and working up in increments to the max speed that you can play cleanly. Go above this only rarely.
Plan and keep track. Set reasonable short term goals. Keep a journal. Be very analytical of your playing. For example, if you are having trouble with a particular lick, try to figure why, and then work on some exercises to improve that particular technique in isolation.

One thing I can tell you from personal experience about learning to play fast. Progress is not linear. For me, I hit a bunch of plateaus at various speeds. This was always when I'd reached the limit of how fast I could play with the technique I had at the time. When I improved the aspect that was holding me back, my speed would increase very rapidly until I hit the next plateau.

I hope this helps. Good luck.
#4
Quote by Cjk10000
I want to be able to solo like this guy:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Rasite
He does Bodom and Wintersun solos... and has been only playing 4 years!


Don't try to be that guy. He has terrible bending and vibrato skills and can't improvise for crap. His bending, vibrato and general inability to improvise get really exposed in his cover of Technical Difficulties; in terms of speed it's definitey there but that's about it. If you're going to idolise a youtube guitarist make it someone like Mark McGuigan or Doug Steele.

Apart from that listen to se012101, he/she knows his/her stuff.
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#5
IMO one of the best ways to improve your technique is to set a target. Once you'll reach it, it will inspire you to continue practicing.
Although my playing kind of sucks, I practice this way and my playing is way better now(I started practicing half year ago). For ex, now I perfected Death's Crystal Mountain solo(it's not really hard, but I was a horrible player), and half year ago I couldn't play Nothing Else Matter's solo.
#6
He does Bodom and Wintersun solos... and has been only playing 4 years!

Rubbish, his profile states
I'm 19yo guy, played guitar since september 2002.
Call me Batman.
#7
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr

Apart from that listen to se012101, he/she knows his/her stuff.


Thanks! I am a he btw.
#8
Quote by se012101
Thanks! I am a he btw.


Noted
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#9
Quote by J.A.M
Rubbish, his profile states


He uploaded it around 2006 or something like that. I don't expect to get there in 4 years since I have an education to attend to, but I can try


Also, [almost] everyone who posted in this thread is God, especially the long responses. They have already been taken to heart and are in practice/idolizing.
: )
#10
To be able to shred like a shiny golden god, eat lots of fruit and listen to Heavy Metal.

Okay now for serious answer. First get down with legato and mix that with alternate picking and learn LOTS OF THEORY. Make sure you combine speed with melodic phrasing and a nice sexy vibrato. Dont idolize that guy, seriously I have been playing for about three years and a comfortable speed for me is 200 Bpm 16th notes. Also you should learn other peoples licks and incorperate them into your playing.

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#11

I want to be able to solo like this guy:
http://www.youtube.com/user/Rasite
He does Bodom and Wintersun solos... and has been only playing 4 years!
QUOTE]


You know man, I think a couple others hit the nail on the head when they said that guy can read tabs/learn a solo, practice it for months then finally get it down. Like someone else says his improv skills are terrible and his technique sucks.

I'm not trying to bag on the guy he's good, but the best thing you can do for yourself is be yourself. No guitarists became godly by playing exactly like someone else. Think of every popular guiatrist you like, isn't their sound unique, don't they do something just a little bit different than everyone else?

The fact is there are alot of well-known musicians out there that do not understand basic music theory. There are many more that suck at pinch harmonics or this or that. My point is you have to take the time to find yourself in your music. Don't be like everyone else is man, because you will always be trying to catch up to that guy. There are ALOT of extremely technically skilled musicians that can give you a history of every genre and give you every possible scale and chord combo at 500mph, yet they still lack something.

Some musicians spend their entire life trying to be the best when all you really have to be is yourself. That's how you make good music.
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